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Fuel Types in Old Small Engines


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  #1  
Old 04-17-2018, 04:55:28 PM
Axenolith Axenolith is offline
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Default Fuel Types in Old Small Engines

Primary start off question here is has anyone been using Coleman stove fuel in old small engines? I got a gallon recently to give it a shot versus the ambiguous alcohol amount in pump regular. It runs extremely well in my observation in both my Briggs (1943 Model N) and mixed with 30W non detergent in my 1927 Maytag.

It's expensive, but to my knowledge it's just essentially a good, higher octane alcohol free unleaded. Grandpap always did the reverse, running premium unleaded in his Coleman stoves and lamps.
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Old 04-17-2018, 08:30:20 PM
joncrane joncrane is offline
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Default Re: Fuel types in old small engines

I am using the coleman fuel and quite happy with it. Two gallons is a lot of running over a days time and eliminates the hassel of water and gum. Engines seem to like the stuff.
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Old 04-17-2018, 08:57:25 PM
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Junkologist Junkologist is offline
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Default Re: Fuel types in old small engines

Quote:
Originally Posted by Axenolith View Post
It's expensive, but to my knowledge it's just essentially a good, higher octane alcohol free unleaded. Grandpap always did the reverse, running premium unleaded in his Coleman stoves and lamps.
Coleman fuel is actually 50 to 55 octane.
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Old 04-18-2018, 04:23:27 AM
sunshineman sunshineman is offline
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Default Re: Fuel types in old small engines

Coleman fuel is very easy to atomize, pump fuel is not that is why old engines respond to this fuel.
Modern pump fuel is designed for injected engines
Sunshineman

---------- Post added at 03:23:27 AM ---------- Previous post was at 03:15:18 AM ----------

I always use coleman fuel mixed with pump fuel in my stationary engines
Sunshineman
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Old 04-18-2018, 05:47:16 AM
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Default Re: Fuel types in old small engines

Coleman fuel, otherwise known as naphtha, used to be called "white gas".

The reason old low compression engines like it is that white gas is what they were raised on.

One caution. Don't use it in modern high compression engines. Because of it's low octane, detonation (ignition knock) will be heard. Not good.

What I don't understand is why it is so expensive. I'm told that naphtha is the feed stock for today's gasoline so there must be a LOT of it produced. Maybe lack of demand or interrupting the refinery process is the reason.
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Old 04-18-2018, 08:33:47 AM
sunshineman sunshineman is offline
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Default Re: Fuel types in old small engines

It turns to fuel vapour easy then gasoline
Sunshineman

---------- Post added at 07:27:31 AM ---------- Previous post was at 07:23:09 AM ----------

What is meant by low compressions engines were raised on it ?

Sunshineman

---------- Post added at 07:33:47 AM ---------- Previous post was at 07:27:31 AM ----------

Aviation gasoline has a higher octane the pump fuel stationary engine love it .not because of the octane but because it will atomize easier
Sunshineman
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Old 04-18-2018, 11:06:34 AM
Clement Rook Jr. Clement Rook Jr. is offline
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Default Re: Fuel types in old small engines

i have been using coleman fuel mixed with 30wt non detergent oil in my maytags for about a year, they like it .the plus side for me it does not remove any type of paint on restored engines
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Old 04-18-2018, 12:38:55 PM
Bill Sherlock Bill Sherlock is online now
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Default Re: Fuel Types in old Small Engines

"What I don't understand is why it is so expensive."

I suspect most of it is sold to the recreational crowd for camp stoves and lanterns. Same reason there are $400 hockey sticks and $300 baseball bats.

Bill
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Old 04-18-2018, 01:55:26 PM
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Default Re: Fuel Types in old Small Engines

I only run the Coleman fuel in my early Briggs and they love it. They start and idle better because its more volatile than our current pump gas/water. Even engines that have weak spark run better on it. I got a deal when they closed the hardware dept at work and bought 14 gallons for $3.00 a gallon. I dont know how well the old 2 cycles would like it but I used it in my Honda GX140 and it ran hot and pre ignited pretty bad. Its expensive but worth it because it just evaporates and wont ruin an expensive old carb if you leave it in there longer than a month. Its great for the old low compression engines.
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Old 04-18-2018, 02:49:24 PM
Andrew Mackey Andrew Mackey is offline
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Default Re: Fuel Types in old Small Engines

As long as you do not load the engine heavily, it will work. load the engine, and you might end up with a holed piston. As stated earlier, only 50-55 octane, too low to sustain a load without detonation. You may not hear it, but it will be there! High test gas is a lot cheaper then Coleman's. No worry about knock. it will go stale in an unsealed container, like your small engine fuel tank though. Coleman's will evaporate over time, but leaves little or no residue to gum things up.

NEVER NEVER EVER put gasoline in a Coleman's lantern or stove, unless it was made for it (OLD) Putting gasoline in a Coleman's lamp or stove, made for use with Coleman's fuel, is to invite disaster . It will cause an explosion! The old Coleman's stoves and lamps were made for 'white gas'. The low grades of gasoline were OK, back then, but modern gasoline is much different than that made in the 1930s. READ THE FUELING LABEL! If in doubt, or the label is missing, DO NOT PUT GASOLINE IN THE ITEM! The newer Coleman's stoves and lamps had a pre-heater built in, to help vaporize the Coleman's fuel., Putting gasoline in the newer equipment will cause the gasoline to boil and over-pressure the fuel tank. BOOM! Coleman's then began selling their own fuel, which was less explosive and had a higher vapor point. It boiled at a higher temperature than gasoline, and was superior in performance than the gasolines of the day. It used to used to be cheap, but now that they have a corner on the market, they have jacked up the price. Now that propane and butane is a popular camp fuel, that also has made the older 'gas' lanterns nearly obsolete. Stoves, heaters and lamps all run on propane now. Coleman's may be trying to shut down production, as demand has decreased. Better get it now, before it dis-appears. I have cans full that my dad bought when I was a boy scout (over 40 years ago), and it still works in my model engines! As long as the can is sealed tight, I don't think it will go bad! if the can lid is not tight, or sealed, it will evaporate.
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Old 04-18-2018, 06:40:54 PM
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Default Re: Fuel types in old small engines

“What is meant by low compression engines were raised on it”

Sunshineman:

Before “ethyl” gasoline was available, all gasoline engines ran on “white gas”, which was essentially naphtha.

It wasn't until ethyl gasoline was available that high compression engines were feasible.
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Old 05-03-2018, 12:44:17 AM
Axenolith Axenolith is offline
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Default Re: Fuel Types in old Small Engines

Hmmm, they must have been fairly over engineered for the pressure difference because my grandfather always ran unleaded in his lanterns and they seemed to do fine, maybe need a bit more frequent cleaning.

Me and a friend had one go area fuel injection on us once while playing cards, but rapid off and relocation avoided disaster.
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Old 05-03-2018, 09:17:32 AM
beechcraft1 beechcraft1 is offline
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Default Re: Fuel Types in old Small Engines

I run Avgas 100 octane in all my engines including my lawn and garden and boat motors. Works perfect in 2 cycles when premixed is needed. Never have issues with carbs,mixers or fuel tanks gumming up. Engines ALWAYS start perfect even if they've been sitting for 5 years or more. Costs a little more than pump gas but it's so worth it. Got all my local engine guys hooked on it after they tried it. Just find a local aircraft owner and ask him how to get some. You won't be sorry.
John
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Old 05-03-2018, 09:40:15 AM
gnucklehead gnucklehead is offline
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Default Re: Fuel Types in old Small Engines

I was just thinking the same thing about old Coleman fuel.. Found some cans in the basement of my Sister's new-to-her home, was wondering what to do with it.. Now I know
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Old 05-03-2018, 02:48:02 PM
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AV gas is totally different from auto fuel. it has absolutely no alky, by federal law, to help preventing carb icing at altitude. it is also more resistant to degradation from aging. it is also more expensive as well.
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