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Mystery Lathe?


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  #1  
Old 02-27-2017, 04:54:48 PM
J Scott Fischer J Scott Fischer is offline
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Default Mystery Lathe?

Hey Folks, I have purchased a mystery lathe from a friend and It needs a little TLC. It spins nice, I have machined a few things on it but looking for a quick change or adaptation I could use, maybe a few gears etc. Stuff to make stuff easier. I can make what i need on this lathe but I would need to purchase more tools, etc. Anyone take a look and let me know if anyone knows anything! Thanks!
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  #2  
Old 02-27-2017, 05:25:11 PM
Jamesk815 Jamesk815 is offline
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Smile Re: Mystery Lathe???????

j scott

Looks like a old 9" South Bend. you can get parts for it on line.
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Old 02-27-2017, 07:03:20 PM
Rob Charles Rob Charles is offline
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Default Re: Mystery Lathe???????

Not a South Bend. I am thinking Sheldon or Sabastian. as guess.Looks like it might have an 1 1/2" -8 spindle which would make chucks easy to find. Rob
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Old 05-05-2017, 11:19:43 AM
George Andreasen George Andreasen is offline
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Default Re: Mystery Lathe?

The folks on the Practical Machinist website antique section can probably identify it for you easily.

I notice that it's missing the entire gear train to drive the lead screw. Unless you have the gears in a box, be prepared for some sticker shock!
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Old 05-05-2017, 02:58:40 PM
Noyes Noyes is offline
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Default Re: Mystery Lathe?

It has a milling attachment, your best bet would be to sell the attachment an try to find a lathe with all the basic parts.
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Old 05-05-2017, 10:31:33 PM
dalmatiangirl61 dalmatiangirl61 is offline
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Default Re: Mystery Lathe?

In pic 3 it looks like a lot of the gear train on the back corner of bench, and in pic 4 we see the gear cover, any other parts not pictured? From what we can see you need a compound rest, and probably a set of change gears, I do not believe that lathe had a quick change gear box on it the way it is set up. You might try searching "lathe" in ebay and try to identify it by matching it to one for sale, I've been able to identify a few machines that way.
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Old 05-06-2017, 11:23:25 AM
Jamesk815 Jamesk815 is offline
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Default Re: Mystery Lathe?

J Scott
The more i look at the lathe, the more i think you would be better off saving your money, and looking for a lathe with a few attachments. I think you would be money ahead and then you would have something decent to work with.
When purchasing tooling for a lathe you can figure on spending as much or more for the tooling you need as you payed for the lathe.
Good luck.
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Old 05-07-2017, 11:04:57 AM
Pete Spaco Pete Spaco is offline
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Default Re: Mystery Lathe?

I think you should do a complete inventory of all the parts that you do have. As mentioned earlier, I see a change gear banjo in pic 3.
-How much of the change gear set IS there?
-Are the reversing gear parts there?
-Do you have the compound?
It almost looks like the previous owner might have been "restoring" it, since the paint looks so fresh. Maybe he/she just never got it put back together.

I hate to admit it, but I have a few partially completed projects around here where some the parts are a LLLLOOOONNNGGG ways away from the main machine. I do worry sometimes, that if someone else were to clean the place up for "auction", that they'd never think to put all those parts back together.

My point is, that you should go back to the PO and ask if they have more parts stashed someplace.

Pete Stanaitis
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Old 05-07-2017, 11:06:26 AM
dkamp dkamp is offline
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Default Re: Mystery Lathe?

The first thing I would do, is look for ANY identifying marks, then inspect the castings, fasteners, and mechanisms very carefully.

The change gear system being one of the important ones, the carriage controls and cross-slide being another, and the headstock casting shape as well.

Then I'd spend LOTS of time with my head in the massive rabbit-hole of information gathered at lathes.co.uk

As for it's viability as a lathe, it's certainly a whole lot more svelte than my early Craftsman (atlas) 10. This one appears to be in the same weight-class as a South Bend, but the castings I see don't look to have the finish quality... but it may be incredibly poor paint over globs of grease.

As for the usability, there's NO lathe, no matter how BAD it is, that can't be made into something that does something.

As for the change gears... there's TWO uses for change gears- first is for feeds, second is for threading. Most lathe operations are about feeds rather than threading. I had a lathe many years ago that had no change gears at all- it was literally thrown in scrap pile because parts had been robbed off of it, hence no crossfeed. I needed to turn parts round, so I put a bicycle chainring on the leadscrew, and a winshield wiper motor out of a school bus, fitted with a freewheel sprocket. I put a variable power supply on the wiper motor, and set my feedrates by observation. It worked incredibly well for zero investment, and with a little more added to the motor controls, it could do a really nice job of quick-reverse (like the Monarch 10EE's ELSR).

One could CNC something like that, but it'd still be difficult to get a locked synchronicity for accurate threadcutting, so not sensible to go through the devlopment effort.

On the other hand, think of how pattern-following operations were done... if the machine had a carriage-follower bracket with touch-switches, and another feeder on the cross-feed, one could follow a profile pretty darned well.

So it's by no means something that belongs in a junk pile.

And the only thing more necessary in one's shop than a good lathe...
Is a second good lathe.

Always necessary to have a second forklift, and a second vertical mill, and a second refrigerator...
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Old 05-07-2017, 01:55:59 PM
dkamp dkamp is offline
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Default Re: Mystery Lathe?

The 'unique' things that jump out at me:

The base 'feet' are oval shaped. That's uncommon. The bottom of the lathe bed is flat for substantially longer than the feet engage the bed. It COULD be that this was originally on some other base, but these oval things came from something else.

The headstock access (assuming there's a flat or V-belt under there?) looks like the cover swings towards the operatory, rather than back. That's odd, because the cover would probalby be in your face whilst trying to shift belt position...

Bed has V-ways on both front and back, but neither the headstock nor tailstock appear to engage them... perhaps that's not odd, but it strikes me a such. The carriage is wide, but not so wide as to preclude adding that engagement.

Bed-to-headstock clamp is on a large radius, not flat.

Despite the rest of the castings being curvacous, the leadscrew left-end bearing block is rather simple and square... that's strange...

The bed casting appears to be very svelte with it's middle bracing. Doesn't appear tapered towards the top, so it probably holds chips quite a bit.

Last edited by dkamp; 05-07-2017 at 02:09:41 PM.
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Old 05-07-2017, 02:05:31 PM
Rob Charles Rob Charles is offline
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Default Re: Mystery Lathe?

There's only 1 thing you don't need a second of "A Wife" Everything else 2 or more is just the start. Rob
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