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Farm Antiques and Collectibles Old belt driven farm equipment: shellers, milkers, threshers and pumps.

Farm Antiques and Collectibles

IHC Type B Burr Mill Question


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  #1  
Old 07-19-2019, 10:02:06 PM
Nik M Nik M is offline
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Default IHC Type B Burr Mill Question

What does the pictured flat steel, pivoting piece do?
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  #2  
Old 07-19-2019, 10:16:13 PM
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Default Re: IHC Type B Burr Mill Question

It is called an "End Thrust Box Stop" in the book, but I still don't understand what its function is.
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Old 07-19-2019, 11:00:14 PM
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Default Re: IHC Type B Burr Mill Question

It appears the nuts on the cross arm tie rods (1 in the image) hold the cross arm on to the main frame, the next set of bolts hold the plate adjusting yoke to the cross arm, and the thrust box is sandwiched between the adjusting yoke and shaft. The adjusting yoke can't go too far inward because of the thrust box being up against the end of the shaft, and it can't go too far outward (fall off) because of the bolts tying it to the cross arm, which is tied to the main frame. So, what does the "end thrust box stop" really do?
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Old 07-20-2019, 04:41:15 PM
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Default Re: IHC Type B Burr Mill Question

I believe it keeps the shaft fully inserted into the thrust bearing. Let's say that you had the adjustment knobs backed off a lot, such that there was a big gap between the grinding plates. The main shaft could slide in/out if there were no "stop". If the gap were to be too large, I guess you might possibly have some issues with the ball bearing thrust bearing??

Another interesting feature is that the "box stop" allows the cross arm to "pull" the main shaft outwards and forcibly separate the plates. This is important when the machine is started up and there is no grain between the plates. You never want the plates to run together or they will damage one another. This is my best explanation for why that part exists on the machine.

---------- Post added at 02:41:15 PM ---------- Previous post was at 02:39:05 PM ----------

Also, the arm is hinged so that the "box stop" can "let go" of the shaft. If it didn't, you wouldn't be able to remove the thrust bearing from the shaft. I know, because I tried, LOL
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Old 07-21-2019, 08:18:04 AM
Nik M Nik M is offline
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Default Re: IHC Type B Burr Mill Question

Thanks. Makes sense. My stop is worn a little on the outside of the shaft end. This would be from the second reason you mentioned - pulling the shaft out when disengaging the burrs.
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Old 07-21-2019, 03:44:57 PM
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Default Re: IHC Type B Burr Mill Question

Under normal circumstances, running the plates together should not happen. The tie rod with the adjustment knob has a shoulder made into it. The rod should be adjusted so that the plates just barely DON'T touch when the cross arm is hard against the shoulder (or as tight as the plates can be adjusted). So why have the extra part in question? If you throw the quick release lever to the "open" position to allow a piece of foreign material pass through the plates, the shoulder on the tie rod is no longer in play and the shaft is free to slide wherever it can. There is a small bolt, nut, and spring sticking out from the thrust bearing through the cross arm. That spring pulls the thrust bearing out away from the bell housing, thereby ensuring that the plates don't drift the wrong way. It's a bit of a fail safe.

Also remember that the "trap door" under the auger in the hopper should be held in place with WOODEN pins, not bolts. They are designed to shear and break if something hard happens to make it into the machine. Another safety feature. I'm convinced these were top notch machines for their day.
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Old 07-21-2019, 04:14:03 PM
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Default Re: IHC Type B Burr Mill Question

This one has ground thousands of bushels. So did it's little brother, and 8" type B, until grandpa couldn't get 8" plates anymore.
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Old 07-21-2019, 05:41:07 PM
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Default Re: IHC Type B Burr Mill Question

I assume he knew that the plates are double-sided and can be reversed when one side wears out?
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Old 07-21-2019, 06:31:11 PM
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Default Re: IHC Type B Burr Mill Question

Yes, and he probably replaced them, too, until he couldn't get them. They ground a lot.[COLOR="Silver"]

---------- Post added at 05:31:11 PM ---------- Previous post was at 05:30:11 PM ----------

Jebaroni, I think you helped me ID this burr mill several years ago. You wouldn't happen to have a spare 1163F, plate adjusting rod, 10 1/2" long to sell me, would you? I noticed that 1) I couldn't back the adjuster rod off far enough to make the burrs completely clear each other, 2) engaging the handle lifted the yoke off of the rod shoulder and nearly locked up the burrs), and 3) the plate adjusting yoke leans into the machine on the adjusting side (not level across the end). All three could be solved by backing the plate adjusting rod off, but the rod comes out of the cross arm. Sure enough, I took the rod out and measured it at 9" instead of 10 1/2" and the tip is broken off. Other than finding a replacement, the only thing I can figure is to place washers between the rod's shoulder and the plate adjusting yoke (and back the compression spring nut off the same amount). I can't gain back 1 1/2" that way, but maybe enough to let the burrs clear.
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Old 07-22-2019, 01:00:47 PM
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Default Re: IHC Type B Burr Mill Question

Sorry, I do not have any spare parts. Likely, you'd have to machine one, or fashion a suitable substitute. I had to make a substitute on my Letz mill out of threaded rod. It looks bad, but it gets the job done. The shoulder can be replicated by a couple of jam nuts and a washer. As long as the knob can place pressure on the spring, that's really all you need 99% of the time.

Also, don't forget to adjust the other rod. When the cross arm is tightened against the stops, the cross arm should be straight across, not leaning at an angle.
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Old 07-22-2019, 06:41:18 PM
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Default Re: IHC Type B Burr Mill Question

Thanks, Jebaroni. I was also thinking of just cutting the broken end off and welding a new stub on.

Last edited by Nik M; 07-22-2019 at 08:01:22 PM.
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