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Model 92 best gasket compound and where to use


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  #1  
Old 02-20-2019, 08:19:24 PM
Captmark Captmark is offline
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Default Model 92 best gasket compound and where to use

I am in the process of rebuilding a Model 92 and have been watching all kinds of videos on you tube and the like. My big question is what is the best compunction to use with the gaskets? Fuel tank gasket output shaft gasket, cylinder gasket, do they all get compound or what? All help is gratefully appreciated?

Thanks in advance,

Mark
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Old 02-21-2019, 11:37:18 AM
Kirk Taylor Kirk Taylor is offline
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Default Re: Model 92 best gasket compound and where to use

Quote:
Originally Posted by Captmark View Post
I am in the process of rebuilding a Model 92 and have been watching all kinds of videos on you tube and the like. My big question is what is the best compunction to use with the gaskets? Fuel tank gasket output shaft gasket, cylinder gasket, do they all get compound or what? All help is gratefully appreciated?

Thanks in advance,

Mark
Sorry, but I can't resist; from Merriam Webster dictionary:

Definition of compunction
1a: anxiety arising from awareness of guilt
b: distress of mind over an anticipated action or result
2: a twinge of misgiving: scruple

To the original question, if the mating surfaces are flat, and the gasket material is soft, you shouldn't need any sealant. It may be helpful to use a small amount of #2 Permatex or gasket shellac to hold the gaskets in place until assembly is complete. Plain old grease is good for holding things in place, as well. I, personally, abhor silicone on most things, especially where it might come in contact with fuel. Silicone has its places; a Maytag engine isn't one of them.
Something to keep in mind is that if you put sealant or adhesive on both sides of the gasket, future disassembly will be frustrating and difficult.
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Old 02-22-2019, 03:32:44 PM
Andrew Mackey Andrew Mackey is offline
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Exclamation Re: Model 92 best gasket compound and where to use

If the correct gasket material is used, no gasket 'sealer' is needed. As long as the surfaces are flat and parallel, the gasket alone should be enough to seal the flanges. If the machinned surfaces are flat enough, no gasketa are needed! 2 examples are 1) the Jacobsen Twin lawn mower engine. The crankcase and bearings are mated metal to metal, the machining is so precise. I recently rebuilt one and only had to give the surface a light coat of Indian Head (TM) gasket shellac, to make an air tight seal. 2) A Caille marine engine. No gaskets at all on this one - cylinder to block nor crankcase halves, even the mixer mount is a machinned metal to metal fit!

As I noted before, a good mating surface should need no sealer, just a proper gasket. The maytag model 92 has 2 common issues. 1) most often the carb/mixer is warped from over tightenning of the mount screws. As the gasket compresses over time, people just crank harder on the screws and evntually the aluminum body bends. After a point, someone replaces the gasket and it does not seal, due to the warp. Then they start piling on the basket cement, and the constant pressure and vacuum in the crankcase destroys the cement. Back to square 1! The only remedy for this is to strip the carb/mixer body and true the mating surface by rubbing it on a piece of 150 grit sandpaper, on a piece of glass until the mating surface is flat. Once this is done, a new gasket should work fine. The 2nd problem is related to the first - over tightenning of the bolts and screws. Making the bolts and screws too tight, on some engines, will actually pull the threads slightly out of the block. This raised surface will prevent the gaskets from sealing along the entire mating surface. A slight dressing with a fine file will correct this.

As mentioned in other posts, more often than not, even a slight coating of grease will be enough. Personally, I give gaskets a light coating of Indian Head (TM) gasket shellac on one side, and a light coating of chassis grease on the other. This allows the gasket to 'stick' on one surface, and the greased side to release, should dis-assembly be needed later. Under no circumstances would I use silicone on a 2 stroke engine block. It tends to blow out due to crankcase differential pressure, and for the most part, gasoline eats it and turns it to jelly that can get into bearings and cause them to fail due to lack of lubrication

As far as replacement gaskets go, for the Maytags, the originals were a carbon/fibre material that was fairly compressable and made a good seal. Most of the gaskets made today are now velum or a highly compressed vegtable matter, which is a bit 'harder' than the original. For that fact, you have to be sure the mating surfaces are clean and free of deep scratches, and that they mate up flat and parallel, in order to get a good seal. If the surfaces are not flat or are pitted, they will weep, especially the fuel tank to base gasket. On that surface, not only do you have to deal with thread pulling on the tank, but more often than not, the tank seal surface is pitted and corroded. Again, filing the pulled threads, and resurfacing the tank gasket lip flat with a pane of glass and some 150 grit sandpaper will have that face tunned up just fine. The model 92 does not have seals on the crank. It does however have 'oil retainers' that allow for oil that gets thru the bearings to return to the crankcase thru weep holes in the bearings. These metal 'oil retainers' can be installed with a very slight coating of gasket shellac. DO NOT lather it on, as excess may clog the oil return holes in the bearing.

As a special note here - make sure the bearings for the crank are in good shape. There should be virtually no movement up and down nor side to side. Excess play wil lead to loss of pressure in the crankcase - oil blowinng out of the bearings, and excessive wear to the con rod and wrist pin and piston. I believe originally only 1.5 to 2 thousandths clearance between the crank abd bearing. By the same token, the Maytag engines depend on the presense of OIL in the bearings to maintain crankcase seal. Modern 2 stroke lubes do not provide this seal. You need either SAE 30 NON-Detergent oil or a TCW-3 type OIL for proper lubrication. NO modern lubricants or synthetics! OIL only, please! Do not skimp on the mix either - 16:1 is what is needed. Cutting the mix to 20:1 or leaner will destroy the soft bronze connecting rod and also will cause excess wear on the mains as well.
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Old 02-23-2019, 08:35:06 PM
Kevin Weis Kevin Weis is offline
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Default Re: Model 92 best gasket compound and where to use

I believe the manual does specify some sort of sealant on the carb gasket.
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Old 03-15-2019, 02:00:36 PM
Andrew Mackey Andrew Mackey is offline
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Default Re: Model 92 best gasket compound and where to use

There were 1/16" thick lead washers under the screws that mount the mixer/carb. I think they are available on evilbay
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