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Maytag or Briggs on a bicycle


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  #1  
Old 06-05-2007, 12:02:50 AM
militarymonark
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Default maytag briggs on a bicycle

so I was wondering, would it be possibly or more like good enough to put a hit and miss briggs on a antique cruiser. How well would the engine do?
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  #2  
Old 06-05-2007, 12:27:20 AM
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John Newman Jr. John Newman Jr. is offline
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Default Re: maytag briggs on a bicycle

Briggs & Stratton never made a hit & miss engine.

That said, the issue is whether ot not one would work on a bicycle.
Short answer - Yes.
Longer answer - But not very well.
Most any old Letter Series Briggs small enough to fit on a bike would only be about 1 hp or less. In order to gear it low enough to be able to get itself going from a dead stop, you would not have a very usable top end speed. Even using a variable ratio pulley arrangement, you just can't expect much from the limited power available.
Here is a (way behind schedule...) project I have been working on to put a 1-1/2 hp REO engine in a (substantially altered) bike frame and use a 3-speed rear hub to try to achieve reasonable performance.
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Old 06-05-2007, 12:34:06 AM
militarymonark
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Default Re: maytag briggs on a bicycle

well thanks for the info, from what I have seen on the site the engine im looking at is a Y model briggs which seems like it'd fit pretty well where I want it to go. But im not really wanting to go fast just enough to get me around town. The only reason Im thinking about that motor is because i can get one cheap. How would that motor do on a bicycle?
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Old 06-05-2007, 05:58:59 AM
Leonard Keifer Leonard Keifer is offline
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Default Re: maytag briggs on a bicycle

New the Briggs Y was rated at one-half hp at 1700 - 1900 rpm. Most Ys I've seen had the single speed mixer/carb on them-no throttle.
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Old 06-05-2007, 10:18:57 AM
militarymonark
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Default Re: maytag briggs on a bicycle

is there a carb that you could put on there that would have a throttle and is there anyway to get more power out of them
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Old 06-05-2007, 12:11:19 PM
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Default Re: Maytag or Briggs on a bicycle

Take a look at the intake tube that runs from the carb to the block. This is similar to the 'Restrictor Plate' that NASCAR uses to reduce the power for the short track racing. However, you are stuck with this restriction as a permanant way of life. The tiny little carb on a Model Y does in fact have a throttle, but there is not much difference between idle & wide open.
Can you get more power from a Briggs Model Y - Yes, if you can figure out a way to open up the intake port and install a larger carb, increase compression and risk running it at higher RPM than it was meant to. This engine is a product of 1930's technology. It was made to run washing machines and other small domestic devices at a steady 1800 +/- RPM. In its original, intended form they are great little engines that last nearly forever. Pushing it beyond that would not be a good idea, in my opinion.
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Old 06-05-2007, 05:18:56 PM
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Default Re: Maytag or Briggs on a bicycle

I have seen a guy at the Orange MA engine show have a Briggs model FI mounted on a Bicycle, and it seems to work pretty well, he can zip around pretty fast. The engine it's self is only a 3/4 hp but was used on a small Moto-Mower and always seems to have enough power to do the job on the one i have.
I think I have some pictures of this bike on one of my engine show cd's
I will have to take a look.
~ Jonathan
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Old 06-05-2007, 05:56:12 PM
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Default Re: Maytag or Briggs on a bicycle

Does anyone remember a few years back seeing a bike at the Baraboo,WI.show.
It looked like a schwinn with baloon tires,it was blue and such a fine job it looked factory.It had a Y model briggs with lever start.
I think it had a cintrifigal clutch with a V belt to a large pulley on the rear wheel.It seem to speed along with enough power to pull the operator around
the grounds.I don't think it had the original carb.
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Old 06-05-2007, 06:03:47 PM
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Default Re: Maytag or Briggs on a bicycle

ok well with this type of response I think I might be able to get something going, find those pics I'd love to see it.
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Old 06-06-2007, 01:24:15 AM
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Default Concerning Maytag singles

There was a scooter and a big wheel trike in GEM a guy had made from plans out of a 1930's magazine article . It was one of thoe motorized skateboards with handlebars . and naturally the spark plug is pointed at your calf . Google up the 1992 GEM an excellent year, and also the 1933 SKippy Racer Scooter .

But talk about an underpowered rig , I'd recomend leaving a little early
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Old 06-06-2007, 08:47:17 AM
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Default Re: Maytag or Briggs on a bicycle

If your calf connected with a bare sparkplug terminal, you'd probably outrun the scooter !!
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Old 06-06-2007, 07:05:32 PM
Ed Radtke Ed Radtke is offline
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Default Re: Maytag or Briggs on a bicycle

there is a guy at Portland each year with a Maytag twin on a Simplex motorbike.He calls it a Simpletag.
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Old 06-06-2007, 08:42:47 PM
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Default Re: Maytag or Briggs on a bicycle

ha lol thats funny
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Old 06-07-2007, 09:01:47 PM
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Default Re: Maytag or Briggs on a bicycle

Since this thread started around the idea of adding a 1/2 H.P. engine to a bicycle for power, this auction seemed interesting.

190120226037

Last edited by Jester; 06-07-2007 at 09:05:31 PM. Reason: Trying to make link work.
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Old 06-08-2007, 12:18:24 AM
Andrew Mackey Andrew Mackey is offline
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Exclamation Re: Maytag or Briggs on a bicycle

Your bike project looks neat. Are you trying to drive the rear axle directly from the engine? I powered an english 3 speed racer with a Bendix 3 speed axle. I used a model 404 REO engine. I modified the controls as follows: The shift mechanism originally was operated with a twist grip shifter. The shifter was disconnected from the gearbox, and re-routed to the throttle control on the engine. A slightly stronger governor spring was used, to make the governor react more quickly to load. A thumb flip shifter was installed, and that was hooked up to the gearbox on the axle. The throttle (twist shifter) was installed on the right handlebar, and the thumb shifter (gearbox) was placed on the left. The stock 3" drum front brake was retained, but the control cable was routed to the left brake handle. The rear caliper brake was modified, so as there were actually 2 sets of brakes, mounted on a common mount bolt. 1 set was in front of the frame mount, and the other was after. A second activation cable was silversoldered to the primary cable, by my grandfather ("German Silver - the best there is"), and both sets of brakes were applied with the right side brake handle. This set up worked well, but the caliper brakes wore quickly! If you grabbed the brakes hard, in a panic stop, you would be pitched off the seat, if you were not ready, and this often resulted in a few burns from the hot engine. One modification I made (way before it was the style), was to strap on a Litre bottle of water, to the handle bar re-inforcement bar, for drinking, and first aid purposes! The REO was mounted on a piece of 3/16" flat stock, salvaged from an old Hahn-Eclipse reel mower deck. The pedal arms were removed from the pedal jackshaft (they were of the removable type, being held to the 5/8" shaft with wedge bolts). A 11/2" diameter V belt pully was installed on the engine, a 6" on the jackshaft. The original driven sprocket was removed from the rear axle (it was retained by a circlip), and the original drive sprocket was removed from the now removed pedal arm. Some careful centering work, and a lot of careful die grinding, soon had the center of the old drive sprocket ground out to the dimensions of the original driven sprocket. As they both were the same width, merely slipping it on to the gear drive hub, and installing the circlip, had the rear ready to go. Finding a drive sprocket that used a bicycle chain was not so easy! I ended up finding the perfect fitting and sized sprocket on the gear box of a 1965 Sears riding mower. It was the final drive gear for the transaxle! It was installed on the pedal jackshaft, and aligned with the rear sprocket with a string. Originally, this sprocket was held on the mower trans with a roll pin. As the jackshaft was hardened, chromed metal, I instead tapped the sprocket with a 1/4x20 tap, and installed 2 allen type set screws in the gear, and then used them to hold the gear in place. I installed a new chain, and due to the change in sprocket sizes, had to add a 4" section, and a 1/2 link (what a bear to find that little goody!), in order to make the chain tight. The original chain guard was retained, but altered. The mounts were carefully drilled out, and reversed, so that the now bigger rear sprocket was now protected by the guard. The engine was clutched by installing an idler pully assembly from a Snow Bird snow blower, on the lag side of the belt between the engine and the pedal jackshaft. This clutch was activated with a hand lever connected to a relay rod and a strong spring. The spring is what actually applied force to the clutch sheave, thus engaging the belt. A 1/2"x3/4" increaser was installed on the engine, and a custom exhaust was made up out of 3/4"bending temper copper pipe, my grandfather donated to the cause. When I drove it during the day, I installed a Nelson muffler to the pipe, to make the bike nice and quiet. For 'off roading', and night riding (you wanted to be heard!), the muffler was removed. I drove this machine for about 3 years, before buying a Sears Allstate (Puch) 175 Motorcycle. After I bought the Sears, the home built bike was dis-assembled, and the frame was scrapped for parts. I still have the REO engine! I was once clocked at nearly 80 MPH on the homebuilt, on a newly paved section of I-280, when it was being built. Granted it was on a down hill section, and it took nearly a 1/4 mile to get there, but man - what a ride The bike was relatively easy to ride, and as I had set the engine as low as possible, the center of gravity was not too bad (yours looks a bit high). 1st gear was rather low, but the machine could climb with any motorbike out there. Mid gear produced about 45 MPH, at a fairly fast engine clip, but with along with 1st was comfortable for trail riding. Third was strictly for pavement riding. 280 was paved for a year plus, before it opened, and along with some clandestine road riding at night, i got a lot of use out of the bike. Oh yeah, one other item! This bike had a generator built into the front hub, that made about 15 volts @ 10 MPH. I used it to run 2 bike headlights, a tail light off an old car, and a set of turn signals, I bought at a bike shop. I couldn't use the turn signals above about 5 MPH though - if I forgot, the generator blew out the bulbs instantly, as they were only 6 volt.
Andrew
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Old 08-06-2007, 11:54:02 PM
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Default Re: Maytag or Briggs on a bicycle

Andrew, I'd love to read your posts but I was never very good with novels.
Sorry lol.Jeff
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Old 08-07-2007, 02:01:38 AM
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Default Re: Maytag or Briggs on a bicycle

How well did the Maytag Racers run? They were 3/4 h.p. I think. Also, didn't Olson & Rice offer bicycle kits with there engines?
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