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1967 Triumph motorcycle fuel tank paint Recommendations


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  #1  
Old 03-02-2019, 03:21:34 AM
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Default 1967 Triumph motorcycle fuel tank paint Recommendations

I am restoring my 1967 Triumph Tiger Cub, 200cc motorcycle. The tank is the original paint, I think it must be a Laquer because gasoline doesn't mar the finish. It is currently a factory Orange top over an off white on the bottom.
I may change colors but I will keep it a solid color top and bottom.

So with today's low voc and mostly water borne paints, anyone have recommendations for solid color automotive paint that does NOT require a clear coat to stay nice? The original paint on the cub tank still shines 52 years later. I will probably powder coat the frame and all black parts.

Are there any companies that still supply mixed paints for spray gun application?

Building the engine complete first, bag it and store it, then paint the frame, fuel tank and oil tank.
Picture is of my bike about 5 years ago. Fun bike to ride around town and on the back roads. Handles very well.
The picture in my Avatar, my 1939 Willys truck is next. Have owned it since 1971.
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Old 03-02-2019, 09:18:42 AM
DaveHC DaveHC is offline
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Default Re: 1967 Triumph motorcycle fuel tank paint Recommendations

Always loved those Cub's , had a 67 also , way back when . Just my " two cent's worth " , but as nice as that one looks , even if it's a little rougher now , I wouldn't touch the paint job , as the saying go's , " there only original once " . Nice project .
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Old 03-02-2019, 09:37:05 AM
Greg Mosley Greg Mosley is offline
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Default Re: 1967 Triumph motorcycle fuel tank paint Recommendations

Greetings, Nice Original. There is an old Adage in the restoration world. Leave her A. or Leave her B. My opinion would Leave her B. Only original once. A fine example. Enuf Said.
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Old 03-02-2019, 10:38:31 AM
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Default Re: 1967 Triumph motorcycle fuel tank paint Recommendations

If the paint is ok, just scuff it and hit it with a modern clear coat.
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Old 03-02-2019, 01:26:55 PM
Vanman Vanman is offline
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Default Re: 1967 Triumph motorcycle fuel tank paint Recommendations

Wow, that sure looks like a beautiful survivor! I have to agree with the above "You can restore them as many times as you like but they're only original once".
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Old 03-02-2019, 11:13:20 PM
cobbadog cobbadog is offline
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Default Re: 1967 Triumph motorcycle fuel tank paint Recommendations

What a lovely ride!

As this is your project you do what you want to do to it. Yes, it is lovely and original now and if changed that is the end of that originality.

I have a few restorations on the go. One is a tidy up of a vintage mower, no paint work as it is staying in it's "working clothes".

The other is a dustless grit blast back to bare metal for a vintage tractor. This will be done in 2pak paint as this holds it gloss for many years and once hardened properly and as long as you wipe any excess fuel and oil spills off the paint survives well. I have a mower I painted in 2pak many years ago and it looks as good as the day I did it. At each start up I tickle the carby until the fuel runs out. I wipe it off with a dry rag and start it up. The 2pak has survuved well.

You need to decide which way you want to go re-do the paint and if so 2pak is the go or a simple cut and polish. Not sure if you do a clear coat over the original paint research how that coating will withstand fuel spills.
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Old 03-02-2019, 11:42:41 PM
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Default Re: 1967 Triumph motorcycle fuel tank paint Recommendations

All you guys are making me re-think about repainting the tank. The frame needs an engine mount re-welded as there is a crack on a weld so it at least will get recoated. The seat on the bike is how I bought it 26 years ago. It isn't a stocker but I believe it is a Bates seat. I want to remove that seat and put a WASSELL trials seat on the bike. Here is the seat. https://www.ebay.com/itm/BSA-WASSELL...00M7:rk:1:pf:0
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Old 03-05-2019, 01:05:28 AM
cobbadog cobbadog is offline
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Default Re: 1967 Triumph motorcycle fuel tank paint Recommendations

It is a good thing that you are thinking over your restoration as once you have decided what to do you will be happy with your decision. So as it is your restoration do what you want and then be happy with the end result. I can see benefits in both ideas so I will continue to sit on the fence and will be happy which ever way you go with it.

Cheers Cobba
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Old 03-05-2019, 01:25:34 AM
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Default Re: 1967 Triumph motorcycle fuel tank paint Recommendations

I have the engine apart right now. I sent my crank and rod assembly, cylinder, cylinder head and the left hand engine case to a guy in New Jersey that specializes in Triumph Tiger Cubs. My crank is a three piece style that consists of two flywheel halves and a crank pin. The rod big end is one piece with a babbit sleeve pressed into the big end. I am having it converted to a roller bottom end bearing. The cylinder will be bored about .060 over and fitted with a piston and rings from a kawasaki. The wrist pin is larger in OD so the wrist pin bushing is machined out bigger. He has used this piston setup for a long time and it has virtually no oil burning. The head gets some way better valve guides that don't wear out in 4500 miles like the original ones did and the head gets a three angle valve job. The LEFT hand engine case, which holds the alternator and clutch, gets modified behind the clutch where the input shaft comes through from the transmission. The stock seal was Mickey Mouse and constantly leaked the primary case oil out. Also, if you ever wanted or needed to change the front chain sprocket for the final drive, you had to split the engine down. He machines a round door in back of the clutch that takes a conventional seal AND can be removed to change the final drive front sprocket without splitting the engine down. The bigger Triumphs had this feature. I will also be changing to a 12 volt, no battery solid state switching ignition and lighting system. The STOCK, Original no battery E.T. system (Energy Transfer) is an alternating current ignition and lighting system. They are very temperamental and hard to tune because the engine has a mechanical advance and AC ignition systems are critical about the impulse timing when the points open. It gets out of phase and the engine crapps and sputters.
ALL of these modifications won't be seen but will make the engine more dependable and more powerful.
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