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Paint Shop Tech. Talk about paint removers, thinners, primers and application techniques plus related topics. Rust removal, paint substitutes and color matching.

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Matte or low gloss colors, how to.


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  #1  
Old 07-18-2010, 11:35:09 PM
Mike Rock Mike Rock is offline
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Default Matte or low gloss colors, how to.

Most of the modern paints are glossy. The old paints were not, in the main, but were varnished over for protection and gless.

How does one take a paint, like 'Valspar Tractor and Implement' colors and make them not so glossy, or totally matte? Is there a chemical trick, or an additive like silica powder that will do the trick?

Help!!

Most respectfully,
Mike Rock
I am mostly over on Horse Drawn Implements
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Old 07-18-2010, 11:53:22 PM
Jim Tremble Jim Tremble is offline
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Default Re: Matte or low gloss colors, how to.

Mike

Go to a good paint store and they will have an anti gloss agent to add to the paint. We have used it a couple of times and it seems to work quite well. Have not seen the extended results as it was for a customer and the engines have not been seen since.

Jim
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Old 07-19-2010, 02:07:20 AM
Mike Rock Mike Rock is offline
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Default Re: Matte or low gloss colors, how to.

Thank you Jim,
I went to several web sites dealing with paint and painting.
I was partial to Rust-Oleum, but several painters suggested that it fades quickly and is not UV resistant. Valspar does mention a matte finish clearcoat.

I will go bother the folks at the paint department in Farm and Fleet. They sell both brands but I have doubts about the expertise in this area. We'll see!

My friend and his wife went museum tripping a few weeks back and saw much unrestored farm equipment in its original paint, and semi-gloss to matte was pretty much the order of the day.

I find very low gloss when taking machines apart, exposing the old paint, mostly from the late forties and before. Much of it, if not all, is lead based paint. I do not know if the implement colors have the same characteristics as house paints, wherein the pigment chalks and is slowly removed by weather, exposing fresh pigment on a continuous basis for the life of the paint job. Some of the McCormick paints seem to exhibit this behavior. Does anyone else know enough paint chemistry to comment on this feature? Many original implements that have been shedded for their entire life do seem to show this.

The colors available today are not matches for the horse drawn era equipment I am working on, some not even close, except for being 'red', in one of its many variants. We have one dealer in this area who does care about accuracy and he is showing me some very good paints, but still in gloss format. So, we have color pretty much nailed down on the McD white (cream), the blue (which is NOT Ford blue) and the distinctive red. Now, we need the matte additive and we might be home!!!

The idea of compounding lead based, very accurate reproduction paints has me thinking. I purchased an old 'paint mill', and have access to literally barrels of white lead pigment, so this might not be so far fetched.

Thank you again.

Most respectfully,
Mike Rock
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Old 07-19-2010, 10:29:27 AM
Rod Fielder Rod Fielder is offline
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Default Re: Matte or low gloss colors, how to.

omni brand m 148 and ppg brand dx685 are both flattening agents, both urethane based, both can be used in paint and clears, both are available at ppg outlets, both can be mixed from semi-gloss, eggshell, to complete flat depending on how much is added. i have used them in the rod shop for many years with no bad results. get a p bulletin to see how much to add. if anyone wants, i can add the p-bulletin info on mixing ratios later on today. remember, no paint has much uv resistance unless mixed with a catalyst. if you want semi gloss, just use cheap paints from tractor supply, rustoleum, lowes, etc., set it out in the sun for a few weeks, and you'll have a satin finish. guarantee it.

just my 2 cents worth

rod
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Old 07-19-2010, 10:29:57 PM
Mike Rock Mike Rock is offline
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Default Re: Matte or low gloss colors, how to.

Thank you!


Can you email me off list?

Most respectfully,
Mike Rock
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Old 07-19-2010, 11:32:59 PM
Rod Fielder Rod Fielder is offline
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Default Re: Matte or low gloss colors, how to.

Get it to you tomorrow. The omni brand is a lot less $$$$$ than the ppg, i see no difference between the 2. Works great to make a suede hot rod and have a very durable finish, unlike epoxy primer.
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Old 07-20-2010, 12:39:01 PM
Rod Fielder Rod Fielder is offline
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Default Re: Matte or low gloss colors, how to.

with the omni m148, add 25 oz. of flattening agent to 32 oz. of color or clear for a flat look. add 12 oz. of flattening agent to 32 oz. of color or clear for an eggshell look. add 8 oz. of flattening agent to 32 oz. of clear or color to acheive a semi-gloss look. add the catalyst as normal. use a little less reducer to the mix as the flattening agent thins the color or clear a bit. make test panels to acheive the look you're after. if you use the ppg 685 flattening agent, use about the same amount of flattening agent with just a little less reducer


rod
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