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Repainting Stenciled Letters


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  #1  
Old 07-31-2012, 04:25:20 PM
Candy T. Candy T. is offline
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Photo Repainting Stenciled Letters

Hi Everyone,
I'm looking for tips on how to repaint stenciled lettering on tin. I have a corn sheller and the paint is very faded. Before the paint gets totally bleached out, I would like to preserve the wording.
What type of paint and brushes do I use on this project?
Thanks,
Candy T.
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Old 07-31-2012, 11:21:14 PM
xplor xplor is offline
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Default Re: Repainting Stenciled Letters

Take pictures of the lettering. Scan them into your computer. Load them into your paint program. Size them. then print them out to make patterns for new stencils. Measure their exact location on the panels. Look into a stencil brush.
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Old 08-01-2012, 12:10:57 AM
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Sam Hamilton Sam Hamilton is offline
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Default Re: Repainting Stenciled Letters

If you follow explor's good advice and can get it into your computer, there are newer high tech way on getting it on your tin. Take it to a sign making company or maybe even a Quick-Print place or maybe even Staples and have them make it into a rub-on transfer decal. The picture below is the decal we designed at home for our 6HP Mogul in the picture by my name. They can resize the original. I think we used the Draw part of Microsoft Office.
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Old 10-09-2012, 03:43:05 PM
rick janzen rick janzen is offline
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Default Re: Repainting Stenciled Letters

Both suggestions are good. If you do want to take a shot at painting them, you should try to track down some One Shot sign paint, or in a pinch, you could use Tremclad, or Rust-o-leum paint. As for brushes, a sign quill is the way to go, otherwise you should be able to find something a the local art store. Make sure it's for oil paint, and has a chiseled edge. To prepare the surface for paint, wipe with a wax and grease remover, and remove any flaking paint. Just take your time and enjoy.
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Old 10-10-2012, 07:31:11 PM
PTSideshow PTSideshow is offline
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Default Re: Repainting Stenciled Letters

As been said about the new stencils but use file folder stock or what is called Manilla folder stock. One shot sign paint and lettering quills and stencil supplies and the proper brushes for stenciling can be had at Dick Blick's either on line or at their brick and mortar stores.

Back in the day the stencil paint/ink wasn't the same higher pigment as real paint. That is why some fade faster and more completely than other, also depending on the color, along with inside, outside they didn't have UV stabilizers in it back in the day.

When you get ready to mount the stencil on the item, use a couple of small strips of masking tape as hinges across the top of the stencil.

You may want to spray both sides of your finished stencil with cheap hair spray so it doesn't let the paint/ink thru. Since the original stencil card stock was wax coated.

You dip the brush in the paint and then on a scrap paper then to the stencil numerous lite taps straight up and down will give you a good imprint.

The round stencil brushes work best with the lest practice, the size brush you want is wider than width of the letter.

And practice, practice before you do it for real.

By the way the stencil brushes are cheaper then lettering quills, and some quills you still have to supply a handle. Plus they take more practice.
here is a posting that might have some other info check post #8 for lettering quills
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Old 10-23-2012, 11:31:45 PM
Avery22x36 Avery22x36 is offline
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Default Re: Repainting Stenciled Letters

I got a question, was the fancy scrollwork and artistic stuff really Stenciled on things or was it a silkscreen? I know that the Santa Fe RR had a regular Silkscreen Dept that put their logo on signs and stuff for both indoor and outside use. I am certian some of the wagon makers used a silkscreen for their logos, they are not decals and the detail is so fine it about has to be silkscreened.
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Old 10-24-2012, 09:32:56 AM
PTSideshow PTSideshow is offline
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Default Re: Repainting Stenciled Letters

Silk screen is a recent development comparatively speaking. More so the vertical and around shapes, or curves very recent.
as to the wagon and car makers they had large decoration depts that included, stripers, letters, people that only did curve stuff.
Even the auto makers had in house striping. Case in point the Viper was hand striped locally by a character that went by Dr. Ru pin striper he did every one as far as I know, till the last one
The carriage and wagon makers even had people that only did the True and original Japanning style paint coating before the Faux easier ones were adopted.

Some used a type of stripping brushes called pens, some used a German silver pen and compass pen of the style, that was used in the old drafting kits as inking pens. You had to round off the points as the were made for inking.

Very little stencil work was done except on the very inexpensive heavy work wagons.

They have had a type of transfer printing also today called pad printing which is a variant of something like a rubber stamp Decals also have been around for a lot longer than people think the water slide type the carrier thickness is dependent on the type and number of layers that are applied during its manufacture. But some makers did employee women artists that were skilled in the art of very small and delicate lettering.
astragalpress.com Has a good selection of books on how wagons, carriages were built and wooden wheel building.
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Old 10-24-2012, 09:10:17 PM
Avery22x36 Avery22x36 is offline
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Default Re: Repainting Stenciled Letters

I got a John Deere grain wagon in my shop right now with about 10 lines of patent dates in the paint and I am very certian its not hand painted as they are smaller than Pica but very readable. Its not a water slip or decal of any kind either. I talked to a guy some time ago who worked in the Topeka shops screen printing for the SF RR, he said on special outside signs they had elaborite screen set ups at least before World War One. He said the RR had a collection of "master screens" and then numbers or names might be stenciled in addition to them. I wish he was still alive, I would like to make up silkscreens for my Avery thresher and he would have been the man!
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Old 10-24-2012, 10:12:31 PM
PTSideshow PTSideshow is offline
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Default Re: Repainting Stenciled Letters

They do have the stencil material for screening that can be used with computer generated art or lettering. Depending on the age of the wagon would determine the type of lettering whether it is a type of pad printing.

There are a great number of good books on hand silk screen. You could take the computer generated art work lettering to any place that does the silk screen printing on jackets and shirts. The big thing is water type if paint or ink you will be using. As the stencil materials either based on water based or oil/solvent based. For use and the cleaning off the screen. If you want to redo them after painting the wagon, vertical screening will take a couple of practice runs on the same painted surface as the wagon. Each ink behaves slightly different on the assorted paints and other material surfaces.
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Old 10-24-2012, 10:33:57 PM
Avery22x36 Avery22x36 is offline
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Default Re: Repainting Stenciled Letters

Yea, I went through the "vegy ink" on a metal clock face once, I don't think it would dry in decades. I have been trying to find the issue since my last post. There was a carriage trade journal called "The Hub" from the 1880s into the early 1900s and in one of the issues I saw an add for a silk screening kit made by the Edison Company for monograms and logos on Carriages, the reason I remembered it was is I have one of those kits as in the add. I am very seriouse about setting up to silk screen things like my Thresher, Van Brunt drill boxes and other farm items. I am not a sign painter and even things that were originally painted I will have to screen, I figure if I use One Shot and only use the screen once its still a very good investment over my own artwork. Thanks
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Old 10-25-2012, 09:38:07 AM
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Default Re: Repainting Stenciled Letters


Both sides of a screen print screen they are at least this sized wood. 1˝"x 1˝" mitered corners with the old style corrugated fasteners across the corners. The side that is placed up against the surface to be screened with the cord slot routed in it.
Due to the tension that the screen needs to be stretched, the frames are under a lot of stress. They need to be rigid in you are doing more than one color , along with the art work needs top be tight.
You put a border of tape around the edges, then with the art work centered. You fill in any open space with tape or screen block. the tape is easier to remove unless you have a screen cleaning machine.

As to inks and paints. when using on a vertical surface you will nee a type that is thick and won't run down and off the screen.
You can do away with the squeegee and ink in the screen. And use a sponge type brush or fine cell sponge dipped in the paint and applied being mind full of drips and pressing to hard. You can't leave the screen against the surface for to long.

You also have to make sure that the ink or paint is compatible with the type of surface finish.
Some of the inks aren't compatible with lacquer finishes. You also need to find out if an additive is needed to make them weather proof, and UV protection. Some will need to be help or set with heat around 200°F or a little below.

Be aware that certain colors fade faster than others generally this is reds, blues and to a lesser extent some greens.
The screens in the photo are speedballs,

Dick Blick's web site here is the index for it you are looking for screen printing equipments and then go to the book section. Check your local library. Screen printing on fabric,paper,wood,or metal is basically all the same. It does take some practice to get it right when you are stepping out side the box.

The screens are no longer silk but all sorts of synthetic fabrics based on the hole count per sq inch. so you will have to base your screen on the viscosity of the material you are using.

One shot is great if you can get the real stuff, oil based old stock. I don't have much experience the California approved safe stuff. And none using as a screen print medium.
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Old 10-27-2012, 01:53:19 PM
rick janzen rick janzen is offline
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Default Re: Repainting Stenciled Letters

Here's a few more tips that may be of help. Check with the local screen shop supplier, they usually sell pre-made screens, also the proper inks, squeegees and solvents. The problem with doing one offs, is the amount of work involved. Silk screening is design for multiple runs, but can also be used for complex artwork. Another problem is the artwork itself. You do have a few options when it comes to this. First is to hand cut the design or lettering on film designed for this purpose, and then apply it to the screen surface. The second is to get your screen prepared by a screen supplier, or local screen shop. You will need to provide them with a film positive of the artwork so they can burn the image into a photo emulsion applied to the screen. You may also want to find a book on silk screening to help with the details. If you have never done screen printing before, you may find it a bit of a challenge. But like everything, with a little practice, and a lot of patience, not to mention the cost, you will be on your way. I would stay away for using One Shot as it's not designed for this type of application. If the design isn't to complicated, and only one or two colors, I would just get a paint mask cut at a local sign shop. This will save you a lot of time and money. Just make sure they use a vinyl designed to be used as a paint mask. The biggest issue you will face is the artwork. Most of the restorations I've been involved with start with re-creating the artwork by hand, the reproduction is the easy part. I will usually hand paint the artwork, but I've also been hand lettering for 35 years. If the lettering is just faded, but still visible, that is the way to go. I've also posted similar types jobs on my blog that you may find helpful. http://streamlinestudios.blogspot.ca/ Just click on the "Older Posts to find more.
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