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Antique Steel Wheel Tractors - Old Iron Lugs and Cleats

Linn at 150 years of logging show in Indian Lake, NY


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  #141  
Old 12-09-2008, 10:56:04 AM
tharper tharper is offline
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Default Re: Linn at 150 years of logging show in Indian Lake, NY

Rene,

That jack supplied with the Lombard tool kit is rather interesting. A number of years ago a got involved with jacking two standard gauge steam locomotives out of the mud they had been sinking into since abandoned in 1933 and build a new roadbed for them to set on. Both belonged to Ed Lacroix's logging empire and are the famed 'Ghost Locomotives' of Maine's Allagash region.

Anyway, the big 2-8-0 tipped the scales at 188,000 lbs while the 4-6-0 at 146,000 lbs.

Being a remote, protected, wilderness site getting big equipment in there was a no, no. Anyway, we ended up with four 6 ton hydraulic bridge jacks we borrowed from Cianbro Corp.

Its amazing what you can do with a good jack setup. At one point we moved the big engine sideways to get it back inline. (we had both locomotives almost touching)

Anyways, using some greased plates and a couple of jacks set at a 45 degree angle we pushed it sideways. Talk about a nerve wracking moment!! It almost didn't stop! At that point it was sitting on cribbing with the drivers about 4 ft off the ground. If it had gone over we would have been done for!!

Whats even more amazing is that these locomotives were assembled on site (boilers mounted on frames etc) in 1926 & 1928 without a crane. Just jacks and blocking! Thats what inspired us to do it in 1995. Its the old adage if its been done once it can be done again.

Incidently we could have used a Linn or Lombard to haul the ballast across the lake for us. As it was we moved 150 yards of it using plastic buckets and snowmobiles. Thats over 4200 buckets of rock!

T.
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  #142  
Old 12-10-2008, 10:53:22 AM
Rene Elliott Rene Elliott is offline
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Default Re: Linn at 150 years of logging show in Indian Lake, NY

Here I thought Lacroix dragged those engines across the lake with Lombards?
It has to be one of the colossal whoops of the State of Maine when they burnt down that engine shed. It always bugs me that many look at the "natural enviroment" like mankind came from Mars and hasn't always been part of it.
One of the "industrial archeology" references I have is a 1917 Smyth Despard Co. of Utica, NY catalog, I know from old records that Linn purchased supplies from them, and my railroad jack, a hand truck and wrenches I have that I know came from the Linn factory (about 700' from where I live), appear in this catalog. I scanned in the jacks shown, mine is the # 2 Barret, the rail lifting toe has made it pretty handy when you have no clearance for a bottle jack.
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  #143  
Old 12-10-2008, 11:21:27 AM
tharper tharper is offline
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Default Re: Linn at 150 years of logging show in Indian Lake, NY

The really sad part is what the state did at Churchill Lake.

In 1974 (as a very young lad) I visted Churchill. At that time there were still two Lombards in the shed (which had partially collapsed) It looked like the mechanics had taken a coffee break in 1933 and never came back.

There were boxes of spare parts, a lineshaft driven from an old Chevy engine powered what machinery they had. One bay was stacked full of sleds, another with batauxs and a boom boat with a flathead? in it.

Another bay had all kinds of misc. stuff and a whole bunch of stove parts. At the end of the Warehouse (which still stands) there was a pile of old make & break engines. The huge horse barn was still standing. I remember it was whitewashed inside and had electric lights.

When my dad heard that they were going to burn the tractor shed he wrote letterss trying to save it. It was to avail. The following summer we returned to find the shed burned and the Lombards sitting outside scorched from the heat. Everything else was simply burned and buldozed over.
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  #144  
Old 12-10-2008, 11:48:57 AM
tharper tharper is offline
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Default Re: Linn at 150 years of logging show in Indian Lake, NY

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rene Elliott View Post
Here I thought Lacroix dragged those engines across the lake with Lombards?
Rene,

Lombards were indeed used. I have photos of the locomotives being hauled in pieces. (big pieces) But they didn't travel the lake. It was a close thing too. They didn't move EL&WB No. 2 (2-8-0) into Tramway until March 1928. The next day it started to rain and the haulroads they used went to pieces.

Terry
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  #145  
Old 12-10-2008, 09:50:55 PM
loggah loggah is offline
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Default Re: Linn at 150 years of logging show in Indian Lake, NY

Terry, That boomboat had a 4 cylinder T-head palmer marine engine in it, for the life of me i cant remember where i put that thing! Don
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  #146  
Old 12-10-2008, 10:20:40 PM
tharper tharper is offline
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Default Re: Linn at 150 years of logging show in Indian Lake, NY

A four cylinder Palmer!!

And you can't remember where you put it! Rene and I are gonna have to perform some Industrial Archeology on your site!

Seriously, I just read a neat book about those old Palmers, Loziers, Atlantics etc. It certainly got me being more aware when I come across a rusty heap of an engine.

Back in the 90's we found a boom boat up there at another site that was fairly complete (tipped up on its side) with the engine still in it. I have no idea what it was. (I need to dig out the photos) However, years later I talked to Louis Paquett and he rememberd burning his are quite bad on the manifold as a kid.

Terry
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  #147  
Old 12-11-2008, 10:50:13 AM
Rene Elliott Rene Elliott is offline
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Default Re: Linn at 150 years of logging show in Indian Lake, NY

Brennan was another boat engine builder, but only their two cylinder opposed aftermarket car engines seem to have survived, a guy sold one at a show up north one year for $700 that I have kicked myself ever since for not attending. This has left me believing they only exist underwater if anywheres, or maybe some unidentified pile of rust as you say. The cylinders were cast single and the crankshaft was split at sort of a 45 degree angle instead of staight across. Later on all they built were boat engines.
I'd like a Lozier with Peter Helck-type race frame attached, but that's out of my price range.
Right now the Linn tractor "graveyard" has pretty much been eroded by the Butternut Creek, it was right above the fairgrounds next to the feeder system for the tractor plant pond, so it's good I dug around there when I did, some stuff I have pulle dout of the water below. there was a big sand hill there that was mined to build factory buildings (since 1830 when the stone textile mill and water supply system was built) plus regrade the fairgrounds and build the racetrack over the years, then the creek washed into the gravel pit floor in 1935, so Linn moved the creek and built a floodwall, the creek has finally won that battle. This was their "proving grounds" to try out every new tractor out of the shop and show off to prospective customers. The big stunt was to run to the top of the sandbank, (eroded away now so looks more impressive, see pic of ruts) with a full load in the box, keep the wheel straight, and let it slowly drop the nose down and go over it, of course wading through a couple of feet of water through the gravel creek bed always made a good impression too, as back then a lot of towns hauled their gravel and stone right out of the waterways, (something I wish they still did as long as they could avoid driving through the water too much).
In Tug Hill that creekbeds were the only decent route they had for tractor logging, many parts of that were still untouched after WW2 and it's an easy way to determine location of logging photos.
I have since found another spot along creek banks that looks promising but the landowners don't want the creekbank messed with. The old iron sheathed oak plank dump boxes were used to line creek banks as well, there are places where the angle iron framework is all that is left. Attached is a pic of a windshield I salvaged out of the back of a garage I tore down, once owned by a Linn employee next door, after the flood.
Prof. Michael Kudish of Paul Smiths College (wrote the Adirondack railroad books) also produced "Upland Flora" which points out you can tell logging camp sites and old logging roads because of the invasive weeds and grass like timothy that was the result of hay and horse manure a century ago, a concept I never thought about.Horses were still in common use up untiul the manpower shortages during and after WW2, which was another thing that made chainsaws so neccessary.
The state bulldozed and burnt anything on land the aquire, so it is neat to find pre-motor age sites in the sense it has everything pretty much where it was abandonned as far as foundations and old trackbeds go, one site near McKeever you can see the depressions where the railroad ties used to be and where the steam engine was bolted down in the sawmill, a few pieces of the stack lay there crumpled. I just stumbled across it while looking for an abandonned WW2 halftrack and later indentified some Beach panoramic photos at the Old Forge Historical Society as having been taken there. The other thing I have found was that bears and porcupines devoured all the real rubber tires, so synthetic tires laying about generally indicate a post WW2 site. There is a story about a firetower watcher who returned one night to find 3 of 4 tires chewed off his Model T Ford and had to keep it penned in with chicken wire after that.
Lately everything in teh sites i have visited shows signs of being turned over, and all glass shattered in any vehicles, but with copper prices so high lately I guess that is part of it. I can find older bottles around here on farm dumps than what you see in the old camps, and they aren't worth much (I dug bottles since I could walk, that was one source of clutter it has taken years to unload). Precious metals are a far better hobby
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