Antique Tractors
[Home] - [HELP] - [Forums] - [Groups] - [Classified Ads] - [Subscribe] - [Books] - [Sponsors] -

Go Back   SmokStak > SmokStak® Old Iron and Tractor Community > Antique Steel Wheel Tractors - Old Iron Lugs and Cleats
Forgot Password? Join Us!

Notices

Antique Steel Wheel Tractors - Old Iron Lugs and Cleats Photos and information about antique steel wheeled farm tractors. This is where to find the heaviest of Old Iron tractors.

Antique Steel Wheel Tractors - Old Iron Lugs and Cleats

McCormick Deering 22-36 in Tennessee


this thread has 247 replies and has been viewed 31894 times

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #21  
Old 05-19-2015, 01:09:40 AM
FWurth's Avatar
FWurth FWurth is offline
One Millionth Post
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Freeburg, Illinois, USA
Posts: 6,531
Thanks: 7,568
Thanked 6,051 Times in 3,103 Posts
Default Re: McCormick Deering 22-36 in Tennessee

I think that PTO on them is a 540 rpm splined end that simply is threaded onto the end under the cap. For some reason they don't turn up too often with it installed. We had a W30 with it on but the others aren't installed. F.J.W.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to FWurth For This Post:
Sponsored Links
  #22  
Old 05-19-2015, 04:27:33 PM
rennkafer rennkafer is offline
Registered
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Port Orchard, Washington, USA
Posts: 80
Thanks: 45
Thanked 90 Times in 36 Posts
Default Re: McCormick Deering 22-36 in Tennessee

My understanding is that the earlier tractors were threaded and the later (probably all 22-36 and maybe late 15-30) were splined. Haven't had the cover off of mine to look yet.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 05-19-2015, 11:48:05 PM
Mark Schneider Mark Schneider is offline
Subscriber
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Carrington, North Dakota
Posts: 1,163
Thanks: 1,977
Thanked 2,835 Times in 735 Posts
Default Re: McCormick Deering 22-36 in Tennessee

I had a '27 15-30 that had one these PTO shafts installed. Other than the fact it was kind of a novelty to have one I found it a nuisance when operating the tractor on a threshing machine. The PTO turned whenever the belt pulley was operational. Its position was such as to cause a real injury risk as the potential to get your pants leg wound up in it was there while climbing on and off the tractor to start and stop the belt. I made a cover for mine for safety reasons. Also the very high PTO shaft mounting in relation to the drawbar height made it practically worthless for use on any modern PTO equipment.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 05-20-2015, 12:39:15 AM
FWurth's Avatar
FWurth FWurth is offline
One Millionth Post
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Freeburg, Illinois, USA
Posts: 6,531
Thanks: 7,568
Thanked 6,051 Times in 3,103 Posts
Default Re: McCormick Deering 22-36 in Tennessee

Good point Mark! Many years ago as a teenager I went to work after school at a local small farm run by a school teacher. The first day he came out of the house with a bundle of rags and droped them in front of me. It was the remains of a pair of overalls and every seam was ripped apart completely. He went on to say "I was wearing these overalls while driving the 10-20 McCormick while pulling the combine. I got the trouser cuff caught on the pto and it took them right off me, I felt it catch and I held on to the steering wheel tight!" He was using the tractor on a PTO driven AC combine. The then showed me his arm that had a scar the whole length of it, They had to put in 40 some stiches to pull it back closed. Now the event had happened some years past but he always used it as a safety lesson to all new helpers. It got my attention! One lesson that I've never forgotten to this day. F.J.W.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to FWurth For This Post:
  #25  
Old 05-21-2015, 09:48:08 AM
rwood64083 rwood64083 is offline
Registered
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Nashville, Tennessee
Posts: 314
Thanks: 149
Thanked 381 Times in 143 Posts
Default Re: McCormick Deering 22-36 in Tennessee

Quote:
Originally Posted by rennkafer View Post
No hurry on the pics, I'm still setting up shop in the house we bought last summer and the tractor is still on the way apart. It'll be a while before I can do much home machining.







Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to rwood64083 For This Post:
  #26  
Old 05-21-2015, 10:25:20 AM
rennkafer rennkafer is offline
Registered
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Port Orchard, Washington, USA
Posts: 80
Thanks: 45
Thanked 90 Times in 36 Posts
Default Re: McCormick Deering 22-36 in Tennessee

Thanks for the photos! If you ever take that apart, let me know. Looks like it would be pretty simple to fab up though.
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 05-23-2015, 09:03:26 AM
rwood64083 rwood64083 is offline
Registered
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Nashville, Tennessee
Posts: 314
Thanks: 149
Thanked 381 Times in 143 Posts
Default Re: McCormick Deering 22-36 in Tennessee

I had to get Bertha off the trailer and under cover. Wife and I have plans on expanding the shop. Until then, at least the 22-36 is under some covered storage and I can work on it out of the sun.

It was a handful to unload by myself. Like everything, take your time and use your resources. My Ford 4000 pulled the McD but not without grunting a few times in the process.









Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to rwood64083 For This Post:
  #28  
Old 05-23-2015, 06:37:28 PM
Russ Hamm's Avatar
Russ Hamm Russ Hamm is offline
Subscriber
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Canton, Kansas, USA
Posts: 1,768
Thanks: 1,289
Thanked 3,025 Times in 985 Posts
Default Re: McCormick Deering 22-36 in Tennessee

Quote:
Originally Posted by rennkafer View Post
My understanding is that the earlier tractors were threaded and the later (probably all 22-36 and maybe late 15-30) were splined. Haven't had the cover off of mine to look yet.
That is right, the 22-36's slide over a gear at the back of the transmission, the bearing and bracket at the rear hold in on. Iv'e put them on before, the front end is very heavy and it is a trick getting them in. I use a rod at the front through the filler hole to hold it up when installing. The rear of the shaft is threaded and the splines turn onto them. Some don't come off easily.
We have several 10-20's and 15-30's with pto also and they are threaded.
There is an aftermarket shield for them that you will see most on a w-30, or you can make them safe in other ways.
We have several of the pto extensions also that you see in the grain binder parts books, with long wide shields. I tried to run a binder with one of our 22-36's a while back, but the ground speed was too fast. We used a 10-20 and all was well.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Russ Hamm For This Post:
  #29  
Old 05-29-2015, 08:23:24 AM
rwood64083 rwood64083 is offline
Registered
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Nashville, Tennessee
Posts: 314
Thanks: 149
Thanked 381 Times in 143 Posts
Default Re: McCormick Deering 22-36 in Tennessee

I knew it was going to be awhile before I have a chance to work on Bertha. But I did use a 12 ton bottle jack and raised each corner so I could put some boards under the steel wheels. Couldn't stand the thought of them sitting in the dirt and risk additional deterioration.

I tried to pull Bertha up on boards when I off-loaded her from the trailer. The Ford 4000 pulled her just fine but when it came to getting the steel wheels to roll onto the boards the Ford lacked the weight and just spun the tires.

I also found there's a large amount of slop/play in the steering at the tie-rod end areas. Not sure what's worn yet and what will need replacing to remedy the problem.

As always, photos are good







If you look close you'll notice the weight at the right front wheel split the board. Guess I didn't have the ground nice and flat under the board.


Besides worn cleats I notice a handful of odd size cleats bolted to each wheel
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to rwood64083 For This Post:
  #30  
Old 05-29-2015, 03:13:18 PM
Nebraska Kirk Nebraska Kirk is offline
Registered
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Tecumseh, Nebraska
Posts: 340
Thanks: 122
Thanked 772 Times in 174 Posts
Default Re: McCormick Deering 22-36 in Tennessee

On the worn tie rod ends, I would say the pins are worn and the hole in the end of the of the steering arm is worn eg-shaped. My 22-36 is the same way and the only fix is to remove the steering arms, bore the worn hole, install a repair bushing and make new pins. I have had to do this repair on both a WA40 and a 10-20.
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Nebraska Kirk For This Post:
  #31  
Old 05-30-2015, 08:08:33 AM
rwood64083 rwood64083 is offline
Registered
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Nashville, Tennessee
Posts: 314
Thanks: 149
Thanked 381 Times in 143 Posts
Default Re: McCormick Deering 22-36 in Tennessee

Thanks Kirk. I kinda figured that would be the repair. It's just nice to hear from someone that's done it on one of these old tractors.
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 08-18-2015, 01:34:21 AM
rwood64083 rwood64083 is offline
Registered
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Nashville, Tennessee
Posts: 314
Thanks: 149
Thanked 381 Times in 143 Posts
Default Re: McCormick Deering 22-36 in Tennessee

It's been awhile since my last post. I've been terribly busy on every thing except the 22-36.

The 28th Annual Pioneer Days Antique Tractor Pull & Gas Engine Show. Friday, September 11 in Eagleville TN is coming up quick. I'm hoping to enter the 22-36 in the pull.

I haven't worked on the tractor at all. Up until today I had not started looking for a carburetor. I was in luck. I found a replacement Robin S45 carburetor from a gentleman in Canada. It has been bought, packaged and was shipped today.
Maybe there's hope I will have this thing running and checked out before the pull.

Color me optimistic and excited.
Reply With Quote
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to rwood64083 For This Post:
  #33  
Old 08-26-2015, 08:25:00 AM
R Pope R Pope is offline
Registered
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Eston, Saskatchewan
Posts: 25
Thanks: 0
Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Default Re: McCormick Deering 22-36 in Tennessee

It's my understanding that the grey tractors were painted red when they got traded in to an IHC dealer. Lots of them around here with traces of a quick red paint job still visible.
I have my Dad's 22-36 that he bought new. Due to the Robin intake and upward pointing exhaust, it's stuck solid. I acquired a running one on rubber and am going to put the steel wheels off Dad's old girl on it.
Dad's old tractor with the Robin conversion and more RPM wasn't far behind our 1940 W9 in the field. Lots more power than a W6, but the steel wheels made it a rough ride.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to R Pope For This Post:
  #34  
Old 08-27-2015, 04:13:14 PM
rwood64083 rwood64083 is offline
Registered
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Nashville, Tennessee
Posts: 314
Thanks: 149
Thanked 381 Times in 143 Posts
Default Re: McCormick Deering 22-36 in Tennessee

The Robin S45 carburetor was delivered. Looks to be in good shape with exception to the throttle shaft/plate. I'm headed to the shop to do some parts swapping and installing on tractor.

I've gone back and read everyone's suggestions on preliminary checks before trying to fire the big 4 cylinder. Appreciate all the advice. Will be back soon to post any updates

Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 08-29-2015, 01:37:03 PM
rwood64083 rwood64083 is offline
Registered
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Nashville, Tennessee
Posts: 314
Thanks: 149
Thanked 381 Times in 143 Posts
Default Re: McCormick Deering 22-36 in Tennessee

Yesterday I had some time to spend on Bertha. Instead of swapping the entire carburetor I removed the bowl cover and float assembly, installed them on the old carb.

I'm not surprised at home made gaskets. I used to do the same thing when I was younger.


The old cork float is looking a little rough. But seems to be working. Having a tough time getting it adjusted though. Will look for a suitable replacement in the future. May try to find a carb from a Massey 44, as was suggested to me on here.


Oiled up a few moving parts. And moved the Impulse lever into what I believe is the position used to start the engine.


Didn't realize how large the spark plugs are on this big 4 cyl. Takes a 15/16 socket to remove them.
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 08-29-2015, 01:47:52 PM
rwood64083 rwood64083 is offline
Registered
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Nashville, Tennessee
Posts: 314
Thanks: 149
Thanked 381 Times in 143 Posts
Default Re: McCormick Deering 22-36 in Tennessee

Pulled a couple plugs to give a look at the condition.
Found out someone has installed different brands of plugs in 3 of the 4 holes.

This is what's in #4 cyl.



#3 cyl spark plug has no identification on it. Also has a different porcelain design than the others.


#1 and #2 cylinders have the same plugs.



---------- Post added at 12:47 PM ---------- Previous post was at 12:42 PM ----------

Here's where I'm a bit confused. There are two levers mounted to a bracket attached to the steering column. Lever closest to the operator is timing. The other lever... I don't know. It doesn't seem to go to anything and is frozen to the timing lever. Meaning... both levers work simultaneously and don't separate. Did this use to operate something different?



Also, there is a handle that is part a bar just below the timing lever(s). That handle can be pulled out and locked in place but I haven't figured out what it is yet.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to rwood64083 For This Post:
  #37  
Old 08-29-2015, 02:07:53 PM
rwood64083 rwood64083 is offline
Registered
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Nashville, Tennessee
Posts: 314
Thanks: 149
Thanked 381 Times in 143 Posts
Default Re: McCormick Deering 22-36 in Tennessee

Did the best I could last night. Tried making timing and carb adjustments.
Cranked it over for the first time. Spent 30 minutes cranking and adjusting. After the first couple of minutes the engine backfired and residual fuel/fumes were burning in the top of the exhaust manifold. Put the stack on it to help but didn't tighten it up. You'll see in the video I take the stack off to check and make sure on flame is burning in the exhaust manifold.

After about 15 minutes of cranking the engine fired for a couple of revolutions. Was exciting even if it was 2 seconds worth. Going back out this afternoon and giving it another shot.

The video is cut down from 23 minutes to 1min 45sec. Just wanted to show you guys when the engine started to sound like it was going to fire (about the 1min 10sec mark.

Also made sure my thumbs weren't wrapped around the handle when cranking. Sure did give me a workout. Quite positive my posture isn't the best when doing this. Been deaing with many internal injuries from a roadside bomb in Iraq 10 years ago, not to mention I turn 50 next week. Regardless, this old iron will be running again.

Suggestions and advice are openly welcome.

Click center of picture below.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to rwood64083 For This Post:
  #38  
Old 08-29-2015, 03:27:27 PM
Russ Hamm's Avatar
Russ Hamm Russ Hamm is offline
Subscriber
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Canton, Kansas, USA
Posts: 1,768
Thanks: 1,289
Thanked 3,025 Times in 985 Posts
Default Re: McCormick Deering 22-36 in Tennessee

Did you remove the valve cover to see if you had any stuck valves? A tight or sticking exhaust valve will sure make you backfire, possibly fire on only one or two.
Do you have an opertors manual? I or someone else could fix you up with a copy or you can buy copies, these would help you out a lot on timing and such.
The two levers are for the original governor and spark adjustments, yours has been converted to the push/pull throttle lever and variable speed governor like many were. Sometimes a questionable float can flood you out, in the meantime sometimes we will fill the carb and then shut the gas off for atarting until we get the float replced or sealed, then if it takes off we turn the gas on to run it in as long as it will.
You may not have another tractor to belt start with, thats what we do first off many times, then we can adjust and run in, after that they often crank start a lot easier. If you pull start, make sure your clutch is disengaging, i can tell you firsthand how important that is.
Or, make sure you can kill the spark when you need to, those big carbs can run a long time on a bowl of gas after shutdown.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Russ Hamm For This Post:
  #39  
Old 08-29-2015, 04:39:30 PM
Titan1020 Titan1020 is offline
Subscriber
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Grand Rapids, Ohio, USA
Posts: 463
Thanks: 16
Thanked 337 Times in 187 Posts
Default Re: McCormick Deering 22-36 in Tennessee

Do yourself a big favor and go to NAPA and get a set of Autolite 3076 plugs. They are the correct ones for this tractor. Old plugs can give you a very hard time starting.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Titan1020 For This Post:
  #40  
Old 08-29-2015, 07:43:57 PM
Ric Murphy Ric Murphy is offline
Registered
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Port Lambton, ontario, Canada
Posts: 84
Thanks: 7
Thanked 204 Times in 50 Posts
Default Re: McCormick Deering 22-36 in Tennessee

As Russ said the second lever was originally throttle. Mine also has been converted to a push/pull throttle which I have not seen before. I've been wondering how to convert mine back. Did the governor have to be changed also. Unfortunately when someone changed mine they drilled a hole right thru the center of the serial number plate to allow the linkage to pass thru the tank support. I've always used Champion W14 plugs in the older IH tractors. Seem to work ok but not cheap
Ric
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Ric Murphy For This Post:
Reply

Bookmarks


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

F o r u m Jump

Similar Threads Chosen at Random
Thread Thread Starter F o r u m Replies Last Post
McCormick Deering LA skankingiant Antique Engine Photos 3 09-23-2012 09:58:52 AM
McCormick Deering 1-1/2 Widgeon Hit & Miss Gas Engine Discussion 3 09-19-2012 12:05:37 PM
McCormick Deering 10-20? norwich25336 Antique Steel Wheel Tractors - Old Iron Lugs and Cleats 5 09-19-2012 12:12:44 AM
McCormick Deering Troy Vetsch Hit & Miss Gas Engine Discussion 4 06-18-2010 01:21:52 PM
McCormick-Deering Jerry B Hit & Miss Gas Engine Discussion 3 06-18-2009 11:15:40 PM


Use "Ctrl" mouse wheel to change screen size.
All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:58:23 AM.

Smokstak and Enginads site search!


All use is subject to our TERMS OF SERVICE
SMOKSTAK® is a Registered Trade Mark - A Community of Antique Engine Enthusiasts
Copyright © 2000 - 2019 by Harry Matthews P.O. Box 5612 - Sarasota, FL 34277