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Grist mills


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  #1  
Old 11-17-2008, 05:22:54 PM
Don Buchanan Don Buchanan is offline
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Default Grist mills

I kiow this ain't engine talk, but it is more rusty old iron. Is there a specific rotation direction for a stone burr mill? Will it work if turned either cw or ccw? Any possible damage from turning it the wrong way? TIA
Don
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  #2  
Old 11-17-2008, 06:21:21 PM
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Default Re: Grist mills

If they are turning the wrong way i don't think grain will pull into the plates.
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Old 11-17-2008, 06:23:53 PM
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Default Re: Grist mills

Sorry i didn't read post close enough. Idon't know about stone mill.
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Old 11-17-2008, 07:01:16 PM
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Default Re: Grist mills

Quote:
Originally Posted by Don Buchanan View Post
I kiow this ain't engine talk, but it is more rusty old iron. Is there a specific rotation direction for a stone burr mill? Will it work if turned either cw or ccw? Any possible damage from turning it the wrong way? TIA
Don
It will only work correctly in one direction. The stones are cut to pull grain in and carry the ground grain out to the outside, where there are usually small paddles on the outside of the runner stone that carry it around and discharge it out of the chute. Without knowing your mill, the runner must turn where the paddles come over the top toward the exit chute.
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Old 11-17-2008, 07:15:12 PM
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Default Re: Grist mills

If your mill has a discharge spout it will be on an angle. The rock need to turn in the direction of the slope.
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Old 11-17-2008, 07:28:58 PM
Don Buchanan Don Buchanan is offline
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Default Re: Grist mills

Okay guys, here is a shot of the mill. I think it is a Meadows but the people in N. Wilksboro say the hopper has been changed. Looks to be the discharge chute in front and I can feel paddles on the rotating wheel with my finger. So you are saying the ground grain falls to the bottom and is picked up with the paddles-carried over the top and dropped into the discharge chute? Sounds reasonable and thanks for your thoughts.
Don
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Old 11-17-2008, 07:46:51 PM
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Alan Fannin Alan Fannin is offline
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Default Re: Grist mills

This Nordike & Marmon mill shows the correct rotation with the arrow.
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Old 11-17-2008, 07:51:45 PM
Don Buchanan Don Buchanan is offline
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Default Re: Grist mills

Alan, I can't find any info like that on my mill. BTW--any pics of the other side of that thing you can post?
Don
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Old 11-17-2008, 08:05:45 PM
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Default Re: Grist mills

That mill is not mine although I have one just like it. I don,t have pictures of mine on the lap top computer that I am using tonite. There are no other markings on it showing direction. I know that the stones are cut with a circular pattern the pull the grain from the center outwards to the edge. I don't think it will grind properly if turning the wrong direction.
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Old 11-17-2008, 08:12:43 PM
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Default Re: Grist mills

Quote:
Originally Posted by Don Buchanan View Post
Okay guys, here is a shot of the mill. I think it is a Meadows but the people in N. Wilksboro say the hopper has been changed. Looks to be the discharge chute in front and I can feel paddles on the rotating wheel with my finger. So you are saying the ground grain falls to the bottom and is picked up with the paddles-carried over the top and dropped into the discharge chute? Sounds reasonable and thanks for your thoughts.
Don
If you look at yours from the side with the large pulley it will be the same as looking at mine in this picture. They turn clockwise looking from this angle.
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Old 11-17-2008, 08:22:26 PM
Don Buchanan Don Buchanan is offline
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Default Re: Grist mills

This looks like my mill except for the cast iron bracket that attaches the hooper to the wooden frame. What make is yours please?
Don
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  #12  
Old 11-17-2008, 08:31:30 PM
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Default Re: Grist mills

It was manufactured by Meadows but sold through International Harvester dealers with both the WC Meadows and the International Harvester stencils on it. Meadows sold through IHC only from 1915-1924. The serial #'s on the IHC Meadows mills were not the same as regular Meadows, so I can't nail down the exact date it was made except for maybe this...handwritten in pencil on the inside of one of the wooden side plates was "1919". So, I'm going with that as my date of manufacture.

I'm not sure what you mean by "except for the cast iron bracket that attaches the hooper to the wooden frame"
Looking at your picture, it looks as though yours has the same 4 legs as mine. Or, do you mean the brackets on yours that 2 of your legs attach to?
That looks like something made so that all 4 legs would be sturdy.
What is your mill, about a 16"?
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  #13  
Old 11-17-2008, 08:37:18 PM
Don Buchanan Don Buchanan is offline
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Default Re: Grist mills

Yep, I'm talking about the bracket the legs attach to..The Meadows people tell me that was not their design. And I think it is a 16 incher. Thanks again.
Don
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Old 11-17-2008, 09:49:05 PM
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Default Re: Grist mills

I don't think your mill is a Meadows. The area where the grain falls down from the shaker into the auger has 2 separate tubes. All of the meadows and williams mills that I have ever seen had a single chute for the grain. Your mill looks a lot more like a "New South" mill made in Winston Salem, NC. See pictures below that I took of one that I discovered (a friend that collects mills now has this one as I couldn't afford it). The same guy also owns the restored one. These are a LOT less common. The one that I discovered in the barn had a wooden blower housing but the restored one had a cast-iron housing (not sure if it's original, newer, or just an add-on job from a Williams mill).

And to your original question, the TOP of the pulley will turn towards the side of the mill where the discharge chute opening is. The paddles will have to carry the ground up meal up and over the top of the stones to get it out. It sounds odd at first but it's a lot easier to do it that way than throwing the meal UPWARDS and out....the chute design wouldn't work too good that way. Jeb
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  #15  
Old 11-17-2008, 11:49:11 PM
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Default Re: Grist mills

Yep, it's a New South. Very similar to a Meadows or Williams. The visual differences are the cast iron bracket for directing the corn down, into the mill. Also the cast iron bracket supporting the legs for the hopper and the iron ring the hopper legs support that the sheet metal hopper attaches to. I had a large one that I traded off a year couple of years ago. I have a copy of an original flyer around here somewhere. Nice, rare mill.
Here's a link to a photo of the one we had:
http://www.herculesengines.com/mills/24%20Meadows.JPG
Keith
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Old 11-18-2008, 08:17:42 AM
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Default Re: Grist mills

I got really lucky and ran across 2 of the old advertising brochures for these New South mills along with a letter on corporate letterhead from the company President and the envelope they were all mailed in. Picked it up off eBay for about $3 a few years back. I really need to scan it in and post it. I'll see if I can get that taken care of this week.

I too would like to own one someday. For the moment, i'm working on saving up to buy a HOUSE first! It's all about priorities and how I could have been in a house by now if it weren't for me buying up all these corn shellers and grinders, LOL!
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Old 11-18-2008, 09:02:37 AM
Don Buchanan Don Buchanan is offline
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Default Re: Grist mills

Boy there is a wealth of information on this board! I would live to see your scans of the company brochure when you get time. On your pic it looks like ?????American Corn Mill Co. Could you claarify what the first word is?
Grandad lived in a very remote area of western N.C. and I am thinking he ordered this mill from Sears or possibly Montgomery Ward. The railroad had a spur that ended about 6 or 7 miles from his farm and that would have been a good days work to get it home with a team of mules and a wagon. Most of the journey would have been over logging roads. People were tough back then.
Thanks for the help everyone.
Don
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  #18  
Old 11-18-2008, 02:31:47 PM
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Default Re: Grist mills

"Manufactured by"
"American Corn Mill Co"
"Winston Salem, NC USA"

I'll see if I can get it scanned in tomorrow.
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Old 11-18-2008, 07:14:27 PM
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Default Re: Grist mills

Quote:
Originally Posted by Don Buchanan View Post
Okay guys, here is a shot of the mill. I think it is a Meadows but the people in N. Wilksboro say the hopper has been changed. Looks to be the discharge chute in front and I can feel paddles on the rotating wheel with my finger. So you are saying the ground grain falls to the bottom and is picked up with the paddles-carried over the top and dropped into the discharge chute? Sounds reasonable and thanks for your thoughts.
Don
I have always found that the easy way to tell a Meadows mill is that the serial number is always stenciled into the wood on one end of the housing timbers and the first two digits are the stone size Joe Morris
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Old 11-18-2008, 09:16:37 PM
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Default Re: Grist mills

I thought they were stamped into the wood. At least I know they are on the top of the cast-iron ones (they have a wood plank above the cast iron housing). I've also heard something to the effect of one had a square hopper and the other had a round hopper, but this is NOT true as Meadows mills were equipped with both styles depending on year and model. In the Meadows Mills book, there are images that show Meadows units painted yellow as well as red. I'd like to know the story on that! I think some may have even been painted blue (The "Eureka" series sold through Sears & Roebuck maybe?) but i'm going out on a limb there.

Jeb
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