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Hit & Miss Gas Engine Discussion Meet collectors of hit and miss engines, ask questions about collecting, restoring and showing antique flywheel engines.

Hit & Miss Gas Engine Discussion

Gas Tank Flush & Preservation


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  #1  
Old 08-14-2019, 11:13:07 AM
northern1926 northern1926 is offline
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Default Gas Tank Flush & Preservation

Finally got a look at the gas tank on my 1926 1-1/2 M. Tank is original and shiny (under the dirt and grim). Took the filler and drain cap off, and ran a little light compressed air through it. Nothing banging around in it, no detectable air leaks, only the smell of old varnished gas. What would be the best way to flush it out, and preserve the interior and exterior. I am convinced (unless it leaks fluids) that it will not be necessary to remove it. I can picture the pipe threads twisting at the tank if I had to remove them, on or off the engine Thanks!
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Old 08-14-2019, 11:17:56 AM
Tracy T Tracy T is offline
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Default Re: Gas Tank Flush & Preservation

The last one i did that was varnished up really bad I took the fuel sending unit out and took the pressure washer to the inside of the tank, the varnish came out in sheets!
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Old 08-14-2019, 11:34:13 AM
northern1926 northern1926 is offline
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Default Re: Gas Tank Flush & Preservation

Debating if I should just purchase a new reproduction tank. This tank appears to have had a few leaking areas silver soldered once upon a time. Think it might cause me grief in the future.
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Old 08-14-2019, 11:49:11 AM
Tracy T Tracy T is offline
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Default Re: Gas Tank Flush & Preservation

clean it out, and put a very low amount of air pressure to it and see, you may be pleasantly supprised! i wouldnt put no more than 2 lbs of pressure though, or it could become a bomb! its got to come out either way right? so you have nothing to loose even if it does leak.
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Old 08-15-2019, 07:15:02 AM
Peter Holmander Peter Holmander is offline
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Default Re: Gas Tank Flush & Preservation

White vinegar works great for removing rust and varnish. Once you let it soak for a day or two, you can then neutralize the mild acid with baking soda and water. You could probably use a wet vac to suck it out when done and let it dry in the sun. There are several youtube videos on using white vinegar for rust removal.Often used on rusty motorcycle tanks. I can speak from experience that it works. I recently removed heavy rust from 4 trailer wheels with this method. I was reluctant at first, but after soaking each wheel for 2 days in a 50/50 mix of water and white vinegar, I was amazed at how well it cleaned them. One day soaking in baking soda, dried them off with compressed air, and a coat of paint. Saved hours of tedious work trying to wire wheel or sand the rust off. I would definitely use this method again. Cheap alternative as long as you are in no hurry to get the job done.
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Old 08-15-2019, 08:51:38 PM
M.Canute M.Canute is offline
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Default Re: Gas Tank Flush & Preservation

Peter, a friend mentioned that to me just last week. He saw a gas tank that was given the vinegar treatment and he said it left it clean and shiny. Even better, vinegar is very cheap too!
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Old 08-16-2019, 07:29:32 AM
Peter Holmander Peter Holmander is offline
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Default Re: Gas Tank Flush & Preservation

Yes, I did a search on easy ways to remove rust and read several articles on it and most said it worked great. So, I took a 30 gallon barrel that I had cut the top off of. I think I bought 5 gallons of vinegar and with the 50/50 vinegar water mix, that gave me 10 gallons. I put my trailer wheel in there and it was just a little shy of covering it so I added another gallon. Bear in mind, I'm still not convinced yet. I soak it for three days and then I pull it out. These wheels were really rusted up. All of the rust was loose. It would rub off with my fingers. I took a stiff bristle cleaning brush and brushed the entire wheel, then hit it with my garden hose. I was amazed at how it came out. I had another barrel that I filled with water and dumped 4 boxes of baking soda into. I soaked the wheel in that for a day to neutralize the mild acid in the vinegar. Dried it in the sun and then blew it off with compressed air. Its amazing how well it works. As long as you are in no hurry, it works great. And on the inside of the wheel where there was no rust, it did not harm the good white paint that was on the inside of the wheel. One guy on the net cleans rusty tools with this method and then sprays them with clear coat. Sorry for the long winded post, but over the years when I think of the time and labor I have spent derusting things, this is much easier. There also is a method you can use if you have an item that is too large to submerge in liquid. They use paper towels and a spray bottle. You wet the towels with vinegar, smooth them out to remove any air underneath, and then leave it on the part for 3 or 4 days. The towels dry. To remove them, you just peel them off. Hit the part with a brush, and you get the same results.
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