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Historical Engine Article Series 2 " Type 1" Non compression engines


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  #41  
Old 04-30-2012, 11:09:31 AM
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Default Re: Historical Engine Article Series 2 " Type 1" Non compression engines

Here is an interesting photo showing 5 American built "Crown" engines of 6 that were on the field at the 2001 June Coolspring show. This is probably the most that have been together at one time since being assembled on the factory floor 120 years ago.
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Lewis H Nash a graduate of the newly formed Stevens Institure was a very accomplished inventor from the New York City area, From the late 1870’s up until the 20th Century he produced well over 60 patents for water meter and engine design improvements. His company “National Meter” in Brooklyn, NY built their first water meter and was named the “Crown”. It was very well received with it simplicity and accuracy and as a result quickly revolutionized the industry. In the very early 1880’s he developed a clever engine working on the non compression principle with an integrated water pump. What better way to sell water meters than to offer a simple cheap way of pumping water that might need a metered output!. Water pumped by the engine was directed through the water jacket for cooling and a pulsation dampener dome attached to the top of the cylinder.


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As with his first meter he named his premier engine “The Crown” as well. In operation it functioned very similar to the Forest, or Benier, systems. A significant difference in this design was the adaptation of twin spool valves, one for controlling air and gas into the cylinder and the other for flame ignition.

Period advertising boasts the engine was capable of pumping 200 gallons of water 50 feet in elevation in 1 hour for $.01 of gas.
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Although a patent was not issued for this particular noncompression engine a list of his other significant inventions is available by going to this link: http://www.google.com/search?tbo=p&tbm=pts&hl=en&q=ininventor:%22LEWIS+H .+NASH%22#q=L+H+Nash+engine+patent&hl=en&tbs=sbdo: 1&tbm=pts&ei=sY6eT_3UDtS26QHCprDwDg&start=10&sa=N& bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_qf.,cf.osb&fp=69fdf9888f63 7d70&biw=1615&bih=757
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Here are two engravings of the newly introduced engine shown in an article in the Scientific American Magazine – October 27, 1883

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After the development and production of the “Crown” Lewis Nash’s company expanded to include a broader range of industrial engines. A multiple cylinder 4 cycle vertical is currently at the Coolspring museum awaiting restoration

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  #42  
Old 04-30-2012, 03:29:11 PM
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Default Re: Historical Engine Article Series 2 " Type 1" Non compression engines

Back to England - in the early 1880's we have a simple noncompression engine designed by Turner and built at the St. Albans Ironworks of St. Albans, England. Little is known about this specific model. Presumably very few if any were made. Earlier around 1873 Turner did patent and build a few walking beam atmospheric engines. It had the operational characteristics of an Otto Langen but because of its compact design did not require the great headroom of it German Rival. An original existed in the Deutz engine Museum in Cologne until it was deemed insignificant by the company and destroyed around 1921.
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  #43  
Old 05-01-2012, 07:12:22 AM
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Default Re: Historical Engine Article Series 2 " Type 1" Non compression engines

This small offering from Turner is an interesting layout. Here is another (Poor) sketch of the engine shown above.

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This vertical configuration was produced only at the 1/3rd HP size. Tests performed on it showed relatively high gas consumption. Turners solution for a more efficient design was to incorporate a charging cylinder that helped push fuel at slightly more than atmospheric pressure into the cylinder. Although more evolved, this advanced design could also be considered a quasi Type 1 engine and was built in the Horizontal configuration with two slide valves - One for intake, gas and ignition and the other for exhaust

---------- Post added at 06:28 AM ---------- Previous post was at 06:13 AM ----------

Here is another built in the UK by Withers under English patent, No. '397 (26 Jan. 1882). English patent, No. 417 (Jan 27, 1882). Functionally the operational cycle of this engine is very similar to Fernand Forests engine

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---------- Post added at 07:12 AM ---------- Previous post was at 06:28 AM ----------

Henry Dawson of Salcombe England Invented a " High Speed" Type 1 engine where inlet/ gas and flame were ported through holes a skirted piston that communicated through corresponding holes in the cylinder. Other than the US and English Patents, and a couple brief references in period publications, little is known about this design. It would be assumed that this type 1 engine design showing up late in the game after the nullification of Ottos 4 stroke-cycle had minimal success. Below are drawings from US Patent # 392191 Issued to Henry T Dawson, November 6, 1888.
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Old 05-01-2012, 01:55:35 PM
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Default Re: Historical Engine Article Series 2 " Type 1" Non compression engines

Although very little information has been published about the Haigh & Nuttall engine, it was made in the early 1880's and is at least loosely based on the offset crankshaft inverted engine design of Sombart and Bisschop. Other than a different variation of the crosshead guide and the rotary valve its operation seems identical to the aforementioned engines.
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Old 05-02-2012, 06:03:00 AM
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Default Re: Historical Engine Article Series 2 " Type 1" Non compression engines

We are nearing the end of my list. Here is another American entry: This one again from the New York City area in 1885 . It is only natural these early illuminating gas engines were developed in the largest growing residential coal-gas network in the country. Henry Hartig from Brooklyn, NY patented an interesting valve-in-piston inverted engine. His design was covered in US Patent 324554 and described the operation. It is unknown how many of these engines were built, but presumably there was enough revenue to build a fairly large company. Hartig appeared to join the other engine manufacturers from their area in the offering of small water pumping packages. As the company grew, they expanded their line and began to offer 4 stroke-cycle pumping engines. At this time, presumably around 1890 their facility was moved from Brooklyn to Newark New Jersey ( one of the largest manufacturing centers in the USA ). Here are a few drawings showing Hartigs early Type 1 "valve in piston" engine.
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  #46  
Old 05-02-2012, 02:19:59 PM
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Default Re: Historical Engine Article Series 2 " Type 1" Non compression engines

This is the last entry I will include under this heading. ( unless I come across new information) . There were hundreds of inventors but my intention was to keep it limited to the significant designs or ones that were actually in production. I encourage any one with additional information on different or previously mentioned engines to post it here.

If the interest is there, I am considering starting a similar discussion ( down the road) on the Type 1-B non compression "Atmospherically Powered" engines such as Otto-Langen, Gilles, Turner, Soderstrom, Daimler ect....

There were many companies out there however much of the information was lost in WWII and a great deal of what remains is contained in European reference libraries.

Finally we get to Fenner Ballou Taylors engine. He was an inventor in Wahington DC and created a Type 1 engine with integral piston water pump. His design was more or less an "Un-inverted" single flywheel Hartig engine. It also incorporated the valve-in-piston design and had very few unique characteristics.

Drawings from Taylors August 11, 1886 Patent # 347137 follow below:


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Last edited by Wayne Grenning; 05-02-2012 at 05:03:35 PM.
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  #47  
Old 05-02-2012, 04:54:14 PM
John Kendrick John Kendrick is offline
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Default Re: Historical Engine Article Series 2 " Type 1" Non compression engines

Wayne, The interest is certainly there from me. I think all of us benefit from learning about all the trials and the ingenuity that led to the engines we can hope to find and preserve.
Many thanks
John Kendrick Old Cowman
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  #48  
Old 05-16-2012, 07:45:15 AM
Wayne Timms Wayne Timms is offline
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Default Re: Historical Engine Article Series 2 " Type 1" Non compression engines

Hi Wayne,

I agree with John. I was hoping you will eventually get around to the Brayton.

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Wayne

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Old 05-16-2012, 08:32:50 AM
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Default Re: Historical Engine Article Series 2 " Type 1" Non compression engines

Once I get a few moments I will start another thread covering Atmospherically powered Internal Combustion engines such as Otto & Langen, Gilles, Barsanti & Metteucci, Turner, Soderstrom, Daimler, ect. There were many manufacturers, however only a few reached commercial success.

I will also do another thread ( Part 4 ? ) covering other designs including some of Braytons Constant Pressure engine designs.

Hopefully within the next few weeks I can get back to this. My schedule from now until Coolspring show is rather full.

A Question for the readers following this: How many original examples of the engine designs covered in this thread still exist today ( other than the ones photoed ) ??
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Old 05-17-2012, 06:31:40 AM
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Default Re: Historical Engine Article Series 2 " Type 1" Non compression engines

Found another. ( Ewins and Newmans ) This one was an English offering introduced in 1882 in sizes ranging from 1/8 HP up to 1 HP. The rotary flame ignitor located on the front of the head was unusual in that it did not incorporate a relight flame. It is not clear from the description or the sketch if it gets its power from vacuum after combustion or directly by the expanding gases.

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Old 06-18-2012, 08:04:49 PM
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Default Re: Historical Engine Article Series 2 " Type 1" Non compression engines

There was a lot of discussion of early engines in this thread. However, other than a small handful of Sombart/Andrews/Bischopp engines, very few running examples exist.

Here is a video with description and operation of a 129 year old New York City built (National Meter) Crown Pumping Engine. It operates on the Non-Compression principle described in this post.
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Flame ignition and fueled by Illuminating gas



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Old 06-19-2012, 12:10:14 AM
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Default Re: Historical Engine Article Series 2 " Type 1" Non compression engines

Basically all of this stuff is brand new and interesting to me, but one thing it does is reminds me of the absolutely magical air that engines held for me when I first began to notice them as a young boy.
They were like a beautiful sculpture, but you set them in motion with a flick of the wrist, and they would somehow continue to run on their own until you stopped them.
I'm trying to imagine the dreams and fascinations that engines held for these old designers/builders when they were very new and in their developmental infancy.
Thanks for the thread Wayne.
Kevin
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Old 01-31-2013, 08:45:39 AM
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Default Re: Historical Engine Article Series 2 " Type 1" Non compression engines

Just a quick thank you for preserving and making this information available... very nice thread!
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Old 02-01-2013, 09:43:35 PM
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Default Re: Historical Engine Article Series 2 " Type 1" Non compression engines

Thanks John.
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I have been considering doing a follow up of this thread covering type II atmospheric engines. Any interest out there? There were many manufacturers but details on the less known styles is more difficult to come across.
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Old 02-01-2013, 10:30:08 PM
Bill Hazzard Bill Hazzard is offline
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Default Re: Historical Engine Article Series 2 " Type 1" Non compression engines

I am interested.
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Old 02-01-2013, 10:57:44 PM
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Default Re: Historical Engine Article Series 2 " Type 1" Non compression engines

Wayne

It will take me a lot of time to digest the extremely interesting information that you have submitted for us.

Anything you can add will be greatly appreciated.

Thank you for sharing all this information, it is priceless.

You should write an article for GEM with all of this.
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Old 02-02-2013, 04:41:35 AM
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Default Re: Historical Engine Article Series 2 " Type 1" Non compression engines

Wane I hope it's OK with you... I started a Brayton cycle thread...
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Old 02-02-2013, 07:59:39 AM
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Default Re: Historical Engine Article Series 2 " Type 1" Non compression engines

John, No problem. They Brayton deserves its own thread! I will post some details in a day or two - Wayne
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Old 06-28-2019, 11:19:56 AM
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Default Re: Historical Engine Article Series 2 " Type 1" Non compression engines

Re: Post #32 (Economic Engine)
I would like to build a model of this engine.
What is the source of the drawings & information?
Thanks
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Old 06-29-2019, 09:09:38 PM
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Default Re: Historical Engine Article Series 2 " Type 1" Non compression engines

A couple of the images came from their patent the other is from September 8, 1883, Scientific American
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