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Steam Stationary Engines, Traction Engines

Here's One For Mr. Halcon!


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  #61  
Old 06-07-2017, 03:30:35 PM
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Default Re: Here's One For Mr. Halcon!

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Originally Posted by halcon View Post
That new stuff is a Super "C" Tournapull from the early 40s.

---------- Post added at 06:24:37 PM ---------- Previous post was at 06:19:06 PM ----------

G W, Having that plow frame on skids is likely equal to 2 more bottoms. That 32CC has to work very hard

---------- Post added at 06:29:26 PM ---------- Previous post was at 06:24:37 PM ----------

G W, Having that plow frame on skids is about equal to 2 more bottoms-----a big load for that 32CC. outfit appears early may be Highwheeler can help us with the age.
That old 32 Reeves has the square front axle with the small diameter hubs, Clyde. I'd say it was a 1908 or at the most a 1909 engine? Gary
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Old 06-07-2017, 07:27:32 PM
Kelly Tytlandsvik Kelly Tytlandsvik is offline
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Default Re: Here's One For Mr. Halcon!

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Originally Posted by FWurth View Post
Your screen must have a lot better resolution than mine, Here it looks like a cat. And who says that their cat doesn't tag along occasionally, mine do. One used to like riding along in the cab while I ran the combine.
I think if a person got the right screen it might even look like Trumps hair do! Ok I will leave politics out of it!!!!!!

Kelly T
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Old 06-07-2017, 09:47:15 PM
G Willikers G Willikers is offline
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Default Re: Here's One For Mr. Halcon!

Mr. Halcon has possibly walked on this very ground? It is the next stop on the railway. Been through there many times. Would have liked to have spied this scene.
Big power for the job. I wonder if they dug their own coal from south of there?
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  #64  
Old 06-07-2017, 11:20:50 PM
halcon halcon is offline
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Default Re: Here's One For Mr. Halcon!

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Originally Posted by G Willikers View Post
Mr. Halcon has possibly walked on this very ground? It is the next stop on the railway. Been through there many times. Would have liked to have spied this scene.
Big power for the job. I wonder if they dug their own coal from south of there?
This 110 Case belonged to Joe Kennedy, Havelock Smith, E B Dean. all of Creelman. They are cutting flax on Bakers in 1915. In 1914 at the end of harvest Joe Kennedy threw a party for the threshing crew and Mr. Deane. Mr. E B Deane and the whole threshing crew except for the engineer Mr. Tom Benson joined the army. Mr. E B Deane was killed in action in 1917. His name is on the memorial cairn in Creelman. Joe Kennedy Jr. a grandson hauls my larger tractors for me. There are several members of the Smith family in the aria still.
I have 1 new grate in my 110 they had bought and never used, old Joe's son gave it to me when I restored my engine. Clyde. P. S. Rick a good portion of that field has been under water since 2011, might have to swim a little.
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Old 06-08-2017, 06:29:27 AM
G Willikers G Willikers is offline
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Default Re: Here's One For Mr. Halcon!

Mr. Halcon,
Great history of that outfit. We don't often have those connections. That's why we keep you around!
Okay, why is that field under water now?
Also, I know nothing of flax. My dad said the government wanted farmers to grow it here during WW2, and that it was a real brute to work with on the old horse drawn equipment. Did binding flax take a lot of power?
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Old 06-08-2017, 03:23:18 PM
halcon halcon is offline
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Default Re: Here's One For Mr. Halcon!

G, That aria is in part of what we call the Creelman marsh, it periodicly fills with water and has no outlet. Flax is a crop that is grown for it's oil producing seed, the oil being the familiar linseed oil. Some varieties the straw is also used for it's fiber or tow when spun into thread or woven it is linen which is very strong although sinthetics have largely replaced it. When flax was harvested in the old days it was not bound as the packers on the binder tended to knock the balls of it, but was just cut and left lay in small bunches. If you look close you can see the knotters have been removed from those binders. the binders just cut it and elevated it onto the bundle carrier then it was dropped in bunches. Early in the first World War any horse that the army could buy was shipped to the front. That caused a shortage of horses on the farms. That's likely the reason for the soft job the steamer got. When they loaded the flax an hauled it to the threshing machine the old hands were carful not to walk on the load or the stuff would cling to gether. But when a Green Horn excersionist from the east asked about threshing flax he was told to tramp the load or you can't get much on. Then the old sods enjoyed watch him unload. The stuff at times is quite valuable, sometimes in the 1st War it hit 10 bucks a bushel, a 20 bushel to the acre crop was a pretty good mortgage lifter.
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Old 06-08-2017, 08:32:50 PM
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Default Re: Here's One For Mr. Halcon!

The coordinates for the Baker land on google earth is 49degrees 46minuts 38.75"N and 103degrees 22minutes 19.77"W . They had all but the south west quarter. The Bakers all returned to Winchester Ontario some time before 1920.
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Old 06-08-2017, 11:11:11 PM
G Willikers G Willikers is offline
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Default Re: Here's One For Mr. Halcon!

Dad said the government asked them to grow flax and hemp during WW2. I think the flax was more for the fibres, the hemp for the rope. We tried rapeseed many years ago on a farm up near Ottawa. It was something of a failure. We tried some near Hamilton, and that was an absolute failure. The big problem with all that stuff was that there were not many places here set up to handle and process it.
There are pictures around of a 32hp Abell engine decked out in dual wheels all around. Was that one also in the soft land below Creelman?
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  #69  
Old 06-08-2017, 11:56:20 PM
halcon halcon is offline
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Default Re: Here's One For Mr. Halcon!

Rob can likely tell us the story on that 32 Abell. According to police reports there is some hemp grown around here but I haven't seen any rope yet.

---------- Post added at 09:56:20 PM ---------- Previous post was at 09:39:39 PM ----------

My father always maintained if he couldn't get good steam coal, the next best choice for firing the 80 case was flax straw. There is a lot of flax grown here now. They dispose of the straw by piling it and burning it. There is a tremendous amount of heat goes to waste every fall.
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Old 06-09-2017, 01:37:21 AM
Mike McKnight Mike McKnight is offline
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Default Re: Here's One For Mr. Halcon!

I remember seeing some pics in old G/S literature of some Big 40's that burned flax straw while plowing. They had a big ol' rack on the back where the straw was piled. Think it could have made a lot of heat, but I'd darn sure have hated to have been the poor fellow on the end of the straw fork trying to keep a hot fire going on straw while pulling 10 bottoms!

Mike M
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Old 06-09-2017, 07:02:38 AM
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Default Re: Here's One For Mr. Halcon!

That 32 Abell with the wide wheels was at Birnie, Manitoba, which is northeast of Minnedosa near Riding Mountain Park. I have the story from Canadian Thresherman. He put the extensions on to spread the weight, rather than for wet conditions. He was also burning flax straw!
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  #72  
Old 06-09-2017, 09:04:31 AM
David Hoover David Hoover is offline
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Default Re: Here's One For Mr. Halcon!

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Originally Posted by halcon View Post
Rob can likely tell us the story on that 32 Abell. According to police reports there is some hemp grown around here but I haven't seen any rope yet.

---------- Post added at 09:56:20 PM ---------- Previous post was at 09:39:39 PM ----------

My father always maintained if he couldn't get good steam coal, the next best choice for firing the 80 case was flax straw. There is a lot of flax grown here now. They dispose of the straw by piling it and burning it. There is a tremendous amount of heat goes to waste every fall.
That's not rope hemp, thats Justin Hemp, designed to bring tranquil simplicity and calmness to the Conservative party members and make us focus on love and friendship.
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Old 06-09-2017, 01:34:07 PM
Rob Bryce Rob Bryce is offline
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Default Re: Here's One For Mr. Halcon!

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Originally Posted by G Willikers View Post
That 32 Abell with the wide wheels was at Birnie, Manitoba, which is northeast of Minnedosa near Riding Mountain Park. I have the story from Canadian Thresherman. He put the extensions on to spread the weight, rather than for wet conditions. He was also burning flax straw!
Thanks Rick, you beat me to it!

I think there were at least 2 32's in that area (which makes sense when there was a dealer there). I've got a rear rim off I think the other, earlier 32 - no reinforcing bands in the tire. If you read the article, Nels Jackson (who farmed with the wide footprint Abell) ran 2 sets of extensions on the back. The main tire is 30" wide, each extension is 15" so a total of 60" per side. But the lugs on the extensions are not as tall as the main tire. On the front, they weren't really duals. The insides were regular 32 Abell front wheels, but the outside wheels are something else, round spokes, likely in the 50" tall range, and it appears no skid rings? The letter implies that he bought the fronts from Rumely Co. in Winnipeg (just the Abell distribution center after the sale) so that kills my first thought of maybe Case front wheels. Clyde, can you identify these?

--Rob
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  #74  
Old 06-09-2017, 03:06:43 PM
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Default Re: Here's One For Mr. Halcon!

Thanks Rob: Those appear to be cast wheels, probably off a fairly large portable, maybe a Russell. Large portables not being much in demand by 1911, they could have been a used set off a parted out engine. Clyde.
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Old 06-09-2017, 11:16:19 PM
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Default Re: Here's One For Mr. Halcon!

Here's a little more complete photo of that same engine, Clyde and G. Gary
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Old 06-09-2017, 11:35:27 PM
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Default Re: Here's One For Mr. Halcon!

Thanks Gary! I would think if that engine traveled over nicely plowed sod, you would be able to pull a 28 run seed drill behind it and make fair job of seeding. Do you suppose that was his angle? Rob have you ever saw an actual photo of that engine rather than a news paper type picture? Clyde
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Old 06-09-2017, 11:53:21 PM
Rob Bryce Rob Bryce is offline
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Default Re: Here's One For Mr. Halcon!

Here's what he wrote:

"The rear wheels are now 5 ft wide, and 7 ft, diameter. The front wheel, which is made up of 4 separate wheels 13 inches each, and a small space apart, makes the front wheel 6 feet wide, so covers all the space between the rear wheels, or in other words, covering all the ground for 16 feet, the entire width of the engine, thus packing all the land. This engine loaded with fuel and water weighs about 52,000 lbs. When the weight is considered anyone will readily realize how perfectly this great roller will lever out the land, and what perfect shape it will leave it in for the plows. It differs from a four wheeled engine, as the four wheeler packs part of the land twice, and about half of it is not packed at all, thus leaving the land in ridges. To my mind, photo No. 2 shows the only correct design for a farm tractor. The four wheeler decreases the yield but the three wheeler increases the yield every time, and I fully believe when the farmer of Western Canada realizes the importance of such a machine he will demand this design for his tractor. [...] As soon as the manufacturer and farmer come to realize the benefit of rolling all the land, and deriving a benefit from the pwoer taken to propel the engine it will not be long before the four-wheeled tractor will disappear. Before leaving this, I would like to relate my experience in summer breaking. We used a ten-furrow gang plow. This summer we broke some very rough land. After the breaking was done, we made an engine disc, the harrow comprising 3 inthrows, which were placed in the front row, and 3 outthrows placed directly behind, which worked well, then a set of drag harrows. Now here is where this engine shines. It levelled this rough breaking out almost like a floor, and gave the disc harrows a chance to make a nice fine mulch on top, and prevented the escape of moisture. I do not wish to be boastful, but so far as I know I am the only man who has an engine that covers all the land, in this part of the country at least, and the work cannot possibly be done with any other implement to so much advantage."

I have a picture (somewhere) of the 32hp that I got the rear wheel band from (also in the Riding Mtn area). It is from a local history book and pretty poor quality. Jim Robinson spoke with the guy who's dad scrapped that engine too, and there's still evidence along the trail where the rear wheels were scraping the trees when towed out of what's now Riding Mtn park. But I haven't been able to locate another picture of this particular engine. There were stories that some of one of these two engines ended up in a local blacksmith's shop but that's long gone now too.

--Rob
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Old 06-10-2017, 10:47:38 PM
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Default Re: Here's One For Mr. Halcon!

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Thanks Rob: Those appear to be cast wheels, probably off a fairly large portable, maybe a Russell. Large portables not being much in demand by 1911, they could have been a used set off a parted out engine. Clyde.
Rob if you look at post 81 in the engine hauling thread I believe those are very close to the extra wheels on that Abell
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Old 06-10-2017, 11:30:00 PM
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Default Re: Here's One For Mr. Halcon!

32 Port Huron portable wheels??

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Old 06-11-2017, 08:35:49 AM
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Default Re: Here's One For Mr. Halcon!

My dad went on the harvest excursion and he said the best thing was the food. I wish I would have asked him more about it. Bill H.
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