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Case on ebay


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  #1  
Old 10-25-2007, 05:11:17 PM
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Default Case on ebay

I think he has lowered the price on this one. Anyone know anything about it?

300164125472 ebay number
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  #2  
Old 10-25-2007, 08:37:46 PM
Mike McKnight Mike McKnight is offline
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Thumbs up Re: Case on ebay

Hmm....the seller is up-front and honest about what supposedly needs to be done, boiler-wise...small repairs, but nothing that sounds too major. He's got a current inspection report, and says the bunkers aren't original. And, for once, with what Case engines bring now-a-days, his asking price doesn't seem to be that out of line, if it's as-described I wish the seller good luck in selling it, what seems to me to be a fairly decent deal.

I did notice a lap-seam boiler, which some inspectors will wrinkle their nose up at. Just got to know what will fly in your state, and what won't!

Mike
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  #3  
Old 10-26-2007, 12:22:15 AM
pegasuspinto pegasuspinto is online now
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Default Re: Case on ebay

Arkansas' chief inspector doesn't seem too keen on lap seams..i still don't see the problem with one tho, still glad the case here is buttstrap!

Rob
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  #4  
Old 10-26-2007, 07:32:09 AM
Chuck Sindelar Chuck Sindelar is offline
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Default Re: Case on ebay

This one is engine number 31993, a powerful Case 75 (!!"X!!").Case 75s carried a lap seam right up until Case's final production run of 75s in 1921. Big enough to do fine job on the biggest threshing machines ever made. Many of them were also used as plowing engines back in the day. The lap seam was good enough to pass the watchful eyes of the Canadian boiler experts, and many of them were used there as well as in the states. If in good condition, one need not have any fear of a lap seam boiler. The one thing you should fear, is the man that is running it, as with a boiler of any design.
chuck
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  #5  
Old 10-26-2007, 08:00:50 AM
JMathews JMathews is offline
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Default Re: Case on ebay

That is a three row lap. What is the difference between the 75's and the 80's.
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  #6  
Old 10-28-2007, 12:42:21 PM
John Hanson John Hanson is offline
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Default Re: Case on ebay

Looks to me like someone got a pretty decent engine at a pretty decent price! Wish it would've been me! Was it anyone on here that got it?
John
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  #7  
Old 10-28-2007, 02:34:53 PM
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Default Re: Case on ebay

Quote:
Originally Posted by JMathews View Post
That is a three row lap. What is the difference between the 75's and the 80's.
Here is our 1911 75 and '14 80. both are 3 row laps. 75's came with a steel heater and round front axle in 1912.

there's really not much the same about a 75 and 80 other than the boiler dimensions. The dimensions of a buttstrap 80 changed with longer tubes and deeper fire box. They are a bit the same like the cylinder, rear axle lock nuts and small misc. The 80 is an all around heavier engine - taller wheels, bigger crank shaft and disk, large 6 bolt bearing caps, gear pump and over center clutch. The 80s were slugging 10 bottoms in Sod at the Winnipeg plowing contest in 1912 and 13.

I'm surprised this 75 sold by the time I even got to comment on it. I think that price is just right as long as the boilers good. Bunkers look useable until new ones can be made. The only thing I see wrong is the main steam line. Its been goofed up, and the top of the cast stack is gone. Other than that he's got a good engine to work with.
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  #8  
Old 10-28-2007, 06:29:13 PM
JMathews JMathews is offline
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Default Re: Case on ebay

I was thinking that the 80 was a high pressure up grade of the 75. I didn't know that they were in production at the same time.
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  #9  
Old 10-28-2007, 09:26:56 PM
Jim Jake Templin
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Default Re: Case on ebay

I have always been of the opinion that the 75 was largely a big threshing engine (though they did break a lot of ground), and was the pinnicle of the sidecrank engine line starting witht he Case 25.

The Case 80, was viewed by Case itself as a smaller version of the 110, not a beefier version of the 75. The 110, 80, and 65 were really a series of engine of their own, design and detail wise, and were intended as draft engines. Both the 80 and 65 were descended from the 110s, not the other engines. They all had heavier alloy geering, overcenter (quadrentless) clutch, larger, heavier wheels than their brethren, and were all drawn up much later than the basic sidecrank line up. They were Case's best effort at a true steam tractor.
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  #10  
Old 10-28-2007, 09:45:57 PM
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Default Re: Case on ebay

Rev JJ,

Quote:
the 75 was largely a big threshing engine (though they did break a lot of ground)
I remember one of my first years or maybe my first year at Belgrade (1988 - Yellowstone Park was on fire.) I remember Lance Barnes, Don Bradley and Slim Rennewanz talking about the old 75hp Case engines. There were several of us sitting and listening... They each said they'd bet their last nickel that the old 75 (and 25hp as well) had broke more farmland than the 110hp Case engines had. Not necessarily fact, just a recollection of mine, listening to Case men visiting.
Gary
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  #11  
Old 10-29-2007, 12:18:02 AM
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Default Re: Case on ebay

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Jake Templin View Post
I have always been of the opinion that the 75 was largely a big threshing engine (though they did break a lot of ground), and was the pinnicle of the sidecrank engine line starting witht he Case 25.
The Case 80, was viewed by Case itself as a smaller version of the 110, not a beefier version of the 75. The 110, 80, and 65 were really a series of engine of their own, design and detail wise, and were intended as draft engines. Both the 80 and 65 were descended from the 110s, not the other engines. They all had heavier alloy geering, overcenter (quadrentless) clutch, larger, heavier wheels than their brethren, and were all drawn up much later than the basic sidecrank line up. They were Case's best effort at a true steam tractor.
Rev, your 1st paragraph is about right on. But, I don't agree with the other. The 80 was built (beefed) up from a 75, and the 65 was built up from a 60-just like the 50 was built up from a 45 and the 40 built from a 36. I'm sure they intended to drop all of the older line. The 36 and 45 were, but the 60 and 75 were such popular general purpose engines that i'm sure the demand for them forced Case to keep making them. Case had good threshing traction engines being made in the early 1900s, and by about 1907, they beefed up their engines and promoted them for plowing. Each year after that, changes were made to keep improving their engines. The 110 was sort of in a class of its own and it seemd to have a lot of the later features near the start like V lugs, steel stack, gear pump, steel heater and heavy wheels/gearing for plowing. Also the 1st Case by a few years with a buttstrap boiler.
If I had to choose between a 1914 75 or 80 it would be tough. I guess it would depend what you wanted to do with them. I've ran both a lot and like them equally. If your only purpose was to plow I'd order the 80 with canopy and extensions they're tough to beat.

Gary, those old boys were likely right, the 75's (25's) did break a lot of ground because the 65's and 80's were years away from being made, and every farmer couldn't afford a 110. Just like today I'm sure every medium to large farmer would love the newest 600Hp tractor, but most can only afford the 450hp one
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  #12  
Old 10-29-2007, 11:06:08 AM
Jeff Smith Jeff Smith is offline
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Default Re: Case on ebay

Colin,

I think you should start some new threads about the differences between Case engines. An example would be the 60hp -vs- 65hp thread, and another one with the 75hp -vs- 80hp, etc. You could hit every model and how they came out, and then what changed over the years to each design. I know that I sure would greatly appreciate threads like that.

Thank you in advance,

Jeff Smith
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  #13  
Old 10-29-2007, 04:06:23 PM
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Default Re: Case on ebay

I quote from the 1913 Case Catalog "Herewith is presented the Case 80 horsepower engine, an outgrowth of the great success of the Famous Case 110 horspower steam engine."

If one compares drivetrain design, driving wheels, and general design philosophy, the 80 and 65 share much with the 110.

"The Case 110 was really in a class by itself." Well, no it wasn't, it had two smaller brothers.
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  #14  
Old 10-29-2007, 04:43:53 PM
Rob Bryce Rob Bryce is offline
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Default Re: Case on ebay

I always viewed the 80 as a kind of a redesigned 75, based on what they learned from the 110 (and of course, from the 75 too). Same bore & stroke, same boiler dimensions (aside from the longer barrel), etc.

Colin, don't you have a pic from the Winnipeg tractor trials of an experimental 75 with 80-sized wheels, or something like that?

Did all of the butt strap 80's have a longer barrel?

I never really understood the comment about the development path from the 60 to the 65, even if the 65 did replace the 60 w/r to the target market. The 65 always seemed to more of a new design, and a whole lot more tractor than the 60 was (not to say that the 60's didn't do lots of work in their time). It always seemed more like a down-sized 80 more-so than a up-sized 60.

--Rob
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  #15  
Old 10-29-2007, 05:38:59 PM
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Default Re: Case on ebay

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Jake Templin View Post
"The Case 110 was really in a class by itself.".. Well, no it wasn't, it had two smaller brothers.
When the 110 went into production in 1907 the 65 and 80 were years away from being made.(1914(65) 1912(80) So thats why i say they were in there own class. They were designed soley for plowing and some hauling. but also ended up doing a lot of threshing as well. the 80s only overlaped 2 years and the 65 started the year after.
The war came in 1914 and a lot of industrial effort/man power went into that... combined with the fact that a lot of the land was getting broke out west,... so I think Case and other companies realized they had enough big plow engines made to see out the sod breaking, they then focused there effort into there mid size engines and gas tractors.
I also say they are in there own class due to features like an intermediate gear cross shaft, sucsesfull power steering, locomotive cab and heavey/ wide wheels and gearing for plowing which were standard equip.
The 75s were a good general purpose engine. The 80 was offered as a beefed up all purpose engine. and the 110 was for the large farmer or contractor, who had the money and or/ man power to do things on a big scale.
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  #16  
Old 10-29-2007, 08:17:42 PM
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Default Re: Case on ebay

Well.... All the later Case engines except the 60 and 75 have the More Substantial Wheels.... And yes they did Hold Up a Lot Better....

I know for a fact that I and at least 2 other guys had to replace a Lot of spokes in the lighter wheels to make them usable.... Matter of fact one guy replaced all his on his 60 as he was afraid of the engine going down....

I believe the Main Reason they retained the 60 and the 75 is to beat the competitors prices as they were Good engines for the guys that mostly sawmilled or threshed...
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  #17  
Old 10-29-2007, 08:40:39 PM
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Default Re: Case on ebay

The 60 I know for sure, and maybe the 75 went out of production for a while but was (were) brought back due to demand for a threshing engine during the first world war. There was a substantial 500-1000 dollar (depending on how furnished) price difference in the 60 and the 65, and if all you were doing was belt work on a separator it took a lot of grain to pay for those steel gears. I have seen these "wartime" 60s, and most of them have the steel stack of the 65, but that is where the similarities end. Light wheels, with just single angle grouters, quadrant latch clutch, ect.

Another factor that many forget is that in 1914, Congress passed its first bill to build over 50,000 miles of roads. The rear mount Nicks and the steel geared Case engines were aimed at that market as much or more than for prairie busting. The bigger engines (32s, 35s, 40s, ect) of all makes were somewhat too big and unwieldy for this service. Hence the 65 and 80 Cases, and the beefed up 20s and 25s other makers came out with at this time.
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Old 10-29-2007, 09:31:47 PM
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Default Re: Case on ebay

A basic production list of sizes produced in what years.
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  #19  
Old 10-30-2007, 03:55:51 PM
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Default Re: Case on ebay

Colin,
The discussions above have been quite interesting. It has always been my impression that the 75 Case was the workhorse of the Canadian Prairies, not to take anything away from other Case models or other company's engines!
The 75s seemed to have it right as far as being a powerful, all purpose engine.
Would you say the 75 was the most popular engine in the Canadian West? How do the numbers compare to other models, Case or otherwise? Gaar-Scott, Sawyer-Massey, Waterloo and others were well represented; but it always seemed when I talked to older folk about the pioneer days, everyone had worked around a 75 Case!
Case sold a few engines down this way but had a hard time competing with Ontario made engines. Really, a rear mount engine was not a big asset here where wood is the main fuel. A good side mount was a heck of a lot easier to fire especially in a saw mill. You could just stand behind the ol' girl and throw the slabs in!
At any rate, it is nice to hear talk about the different engines in their actual work environment when people had to make a living off them! Most of the companies built their big 30+ hp plowing engines. They were proud as hell of them but sold very few. By the time they got them perfected, most all the Prairie lands were broken. It was the 20 and 25 horse engines that did the work!
Take care,
G.
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  #20  
Old 10-30-2007, 05:23:24 PM
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Default Re: Case on ebay

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob Bryce View Post
Colin, don't you have a pic from the Winnipeg tractor trials of an experimental 75 with 80-sized wheels, or something like that?

Did all of the butt strap 80's have a longer barrel?
-Rob
The barrel was technically the same length. They just pushed the front tube sheet out a bit further. 101 1/2" tubes(same as 110) vs 96 1/2. They didn't gain much heating surface because they had 2 less tubes. I think they gained a little bit with a deeper fire box. To the average eye you can't tell a buttstrap 80 has a shorter smoke box, you really gotta look

Here's a poor pic I scaned of that 'suped up' 75. There's a crank disk side view too, but I dont have it in my gallery.

It shows the 16"(x46?) front wheels. I finally learned from the Winnipeg plowing info that this engine had 72x24 drivers instead of 66. I think the V leg extensions look good too too bad they didnt stick with that. I think this engine may be #22858. If you look in the # book near the end of the 1909 listing you will see and '80' listed. Also funny because they still had all the other engines rated by boiler- except the last batch that year which were '60's. This engine at Winnipeg was testing out a 4 notch reverse lever(instead of 2 notches) and it had a few other small differences.
The final wheel height for the 80s rears would be 74", and 14" wide fronts. The 1st dozen or so in late 11 and early 12 still had 75 motors and cast stacks on them. (*Kory can you post a pic of that Steinbach 80 you guys reboilered?*) In later 1913, they went to 48x14 front wheels.
That 80 that was on EBay a couple weeks ago was about the 4th engine in to have the lower front wheels with a wider axle, clutch lever right up on top, and the later pump drive. Its 18" wide front wheels would be quite a conversation piece.
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