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Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log


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  #141  
Old 01-31-2013, 07:07:56 PM
tharper tharper is offline
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Well... Iam not dead yet. Just been working on a major life change. Seems that since the consulting business is all but dead I have been seeking another career.

All I can say is...My, what a long strange trip its been! In 1980 I walked into a high school classroom and took my place at a drafting board. (no CAD back then!) I knew in a very short time that that is what I wanted to do and in fact did for over thirty years.

Over time I learned and matured professionally to eventually owning a consulting firm providing CAD services to the heavy construction industry. We worked on some amazingly huge and neat projects: Boston's Big Dig (no we did not work on the parts that keep falling down), Croton Water Treatment facility, Port of Miami Tunnel, countless houses, commercial properties, hydro electric facilites and lowly landfills.

This past Monday I began my new career.... in the very same classroom I began my journey in so long ago... only this time I took my seat at the teachers desk.

Needless to say the engine project is on hold for a bit as we pack the shop and house up and relocate to a small town in God's Country.

Best regards,

Terry

P.S.
The lecture at Owls Head went very well. We had approx. 162 in attendance which was great!
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  #142  
Old 01-31-2013, 08:48:17 PM
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Thank you for an interesting and informative thread.I will be looking forward to the update when you get to it
Much luck on your relocation and next chapter.
Dan
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  #143  
Old 01-31-2013, 09:01:32 PM
Kevin O. Pulver Kevin O. Pulver is offline
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Glad things are going well.
Hey, you'll have the summers free! (unless you gotta work to supplement teachers salary)
WHERE is "God's country"? I thought Maine was it?
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  #144  
Old 01-31-2013, 09:34:04 PM
tharper tharper is offline
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevin O. Pulver View Post
Glad things are going well.
Hey, you'll have the summers free! (unless you gotta work to supplement teachers salary)
WHERE is "God's country"? I thought Maine was it?
Aroostook County or...THE County as its known here in Maine.
It a solid 5 hour drive from where I currently live near Portland.

Already found some new equipment for the shop and my class room is next door to the Farm Mechanics shop whose instructor also loves old engines and equipment
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  #145  
Old 03-23-2013, 12:36:25 AM
tharper tharper is offline
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

So.. with the shop and house in the process of being packed-up for the move I have had to find other ways to work on the big engine.
Yesterday one of my students took the valves springs and valve spring seats over to the Farm Mechanics shop and media blasted them for me. It was a little job but it felt good to at least get something done.

Meanwhile I have been playing with AutoCAD Inventor. Amazing program! Just for kicks (and because I had 2D drawings for the parts) I modeled some pieces and made a couple of assemblies. Hopefully, when we take a field trip to the local community college we can watch some of the parts printed out in small scale on thier 3D printer or better yet follow one of the simple pieces through the CNC machines.

Below is a sample:

Here is the intake manifold assembly - I have all the castings just waiting to get to the machining.





and the oil level gauge
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  #146  
Old 03-23-2013, 12:41:13 AM
Kevin O. Pulver Kevin O. Pulver is offline
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Glad to hear the update. Keep 'em comin'!
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  #147  
Old 06-24-2013, 07:09:54 PM
tharper tharper is offline
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So.... after a long silence its time for an up-date. Saturday the big engine went on a 5-1/2 hour ride to our new home.
Needless to say this required the help of a few friends. (and the Mormon Missionaries - Ask the Missionaries.. they can help!)








Earlier when I picked-up the trailer we noticed the Rover had a sticky brake pad. (is anything ever really right with a Rover?) I had kind of forgot about it. When I saw my brother heading toward the truck - which at this point was hitched-up to a extremly overloaded trailer - with a few tools in his hand I asked him what he was up too. "A brake job" he replied. And...that's exactly what he did - without removing the wheels!

Of course everybody was pleased that we got the engine and the crates of parts loaded......than they realized we still had to load the lathe.......



After a long, long drive to God's Country or ..."The County" as we call Aroostook County here in Maine. All (including the lathe) was secured in the new home. And yes.... in keeping with the potato growing heritage of "The County" the new home is a converted potato house.
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  #148  
Old 09-07-2013, 10:58:35 PM
tharper tharper is offline
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Hello folks,

Well the good news is we should be closing on the new house at the end of the month. Finally I will be able to get the shop set back up and get back to my projects.

In the meantime I have been working on developing plans for various parts I will need such as the primer cups. I was a bit frustrated trying to find any that matched the originals. Taking inspiration from a gentleman in England who fabricated a set for his WW1 vintage Thornycroft lorry I decided to make my own.

Since the shop is stored away I had to limit myself to working up a 3D model and the 2D drawings. Fortunately Don was willing top take measurements of his originals since my days of just popping in to his place are over - its now a 5 hour drive.

Anyway, he not only provided the measurements I needed but he even removed one so his wife could photograph it for me.

Here is the original. As new there were neat wooden grips on the levers but over the years these deteriorated. The finished primer cup is just under 3 inches tall.



Here is the assembled 3D model - it still needs a bit of tweeking but its getting there. Its shown with the steel Primer Cup Stud attached which screws down through the cylinder block.



Once the model is finalized I can generate the 2D drawings. Then its off to the shop! Once it's all un-packed!

Best regards,

Terry
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  #149  
Old 09-08-2013, 01:04:31 AM
Tamper84 Tamper84 is offline
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Just read thru this whole thread!!! Very awesome sir!!! Amazing what someone can do when your heart is in it!!! Can't wait to see more.

Chris
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  #150  
Old 12-24-2013, 03:43:06 PM
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  #151  
Old 12-25-2013, 08:50:22 AM
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Elden DuRand Elden DuRand is offline
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Terry:

Merry Christmas.

Have you got your shop set-up yet?

Glad you've survived the business downturn. When it happened to me a few years earlier, I simply closed-up shop and retired.

Now I'm happily worthless and bone idle.

We're all patiently waiting to hear that beast bark again.
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Take care - Elden
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  #152  
Old 03-02-2014, 08:52:32 AM
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Photo Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Ever since I acquired this engine back in late 2008 (Could it have been that long ago?) I have been keeping an eye open for particular missing items. Top of that list was a American-Bosch AT6 magneto. This was listed as original equipment in the Lombard manual.

A few weeks ago, with fading hope that I would ever find the elusive AT6, I threw in the towel and decided that I would be better served to look for a suitable substitute. Being a magneto "newbie" I decided to go to the pro's and posted my question in the Magneto forum.

Within days a wonderful gentleman contacted me. The result being that within a few days a package arrived on my porch containing a sterling example of an elusive (to me at least) AT6 magneto including the impulse drive and conversion to counter-clockwise rotation.

He also informed me that even though the manual specifies an AT6 the parts diagram shows a DU6 - apparently Lombard didn't bother to update the diagrams.

Anyways, my experience is once again proof that people on this forum and in this hobby are amazing! That's been one of my biggest joys during this project is meeting many wonderful people. Thanks Bud!

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  #153  
Old 03-07-2014, 07:03:25 PM
tharper tharper is offline
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Looks like Christmas has been extended into March!

I came home tonight to a package on the porch and low and behold inside was a grubby but wonderful Stromberg M4 carburetor.
This is one of those original equipment pieces I was despairing of ever finding or affording if I could find one.

To make a long story short with my allowance running short and time ticking on the Ebay auction, I had to get a bit creative so.. I held hostage a set of custom spring clips I had fabricated for a good friend - yes, I even wrote a ransom note complete with messed-up fonts demanding that if he ever wanted to see the spring clip family than he better get bidding. Anyway, in short order the carb was on its way and the spring clip family was sent on their way too. Have I mentioned I like the extortion... umm I mean barter system?



Under all that nasty orange paint is gleaming brass.. To give you an idea of the size the throat diameter is 1-7/8"

Oh.... I also scored a nice vertical mill...it should be in my hands late next week.

Now the short list includes:

Vintage 24 volt Leece-Neville starter
Vintage 24 volt Leece-Neville generator

Best regards,
Terry
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  #154  
Old 04-05-2014, 02:43:47 PM
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

After soaking for a few days in Lacquer Thinner I brushed and scrubbed the big carburetor. All that orange paint fell away and with a bit of
elbow grease decades of grime was removed to reveal a nice bronze carburetor complete with a few battle scars. I can just imagine a exasperated driver rapping the side of the bowl to free-up a sticky float.

A few screws are buggered and will have to be replaced and I will have to find or fabricate a brass acorn nut for the top of the float bowl but otherwise it should work just fine. I am fighting the temptation to fire-up the buffer and polish it to a sparkling finish. I would prefer to keep the finish as original to accurately reflect a well cared for as built condition.




In regards to the cylinder blocks - they were primed the other day and should be finished this week!

And yes....woke-up to more snow this morning!

Best regards,

Terry
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  #155  
Old 04-05-2014, 09:16:38 PM
Ed Sparks Ed Sparks is offline
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Thats what happens when you move up to the county Terry
Winter ends just about memorial day and then mud season lasts until mid august, just in time for tourist season.
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  #156  
Old 07-31-2014, 10:39:52 PM
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

YES! Finally I am back to making chips & swarth!

After what seems like forever I finally have a fully functioning shop area. The other day I bolted down and leveled-up the lathe and the mill. Then it was onto fabricating a fixture for milling the intake manifold El's and Tee's. (been a long time waiting to get that job started!)

Anyway, with advancing age (did I really start this project in 2008?) and feet that seem to have no tolerance for concrete floors anymore, I decided to perform an up-grade. I have never been a fan of matts around machinery - I usually view them with disdain as a tripping hazard (at least for me and my uncoordinated feet) or something to slip out from underneath your feet. However... after numerous nights of listening to me complain of my aching feet my beautiful Queen convinced me that I needed to do something. So... I took a trip to Tractor Supply and bought a stable pad.

WOW! cheap, comfy and heavy enough so they simply do not move. Is it still a tripping hazard? Yup! but less so since they won't curl-up or slide. My feet are happy! Eventually I will cut them to recess around the machines.

Now... its on to milling the rest of the flanges for the intake fittings.






P.S: The new shop is in our daylight basement. What looks like a big rock to the right of the lathe is.. well... a big rock. The house was built in the 1890's and all the old stone foundation was replaced with the exception of a bout 10 feet of wall. Eventually I will seal and paint the floor and the walls. Fortunately its a nice dry basement. For wall board over the work bench I am going to use dry erase board - than I will have a place to scribble on.

Best regards,

Terry
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  #157  
Old 08-03-2014, 12:59:39 PM
jeff10049 jeff10049 is offline
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Nice to see that you're back making chips, I thought the lathe was in a potato house. Did you move again or just move the lathe? Looking forward to the next installment.

Jeff
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  #158  
Old 08-03-2014, 10:40:44 PM
tharper tharper is offline
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Hello Jeff,

The potato house (former church) though unique was a short term rental. Back in October we found a house to our liking and made the purchase. Rather than paying rent we are now in a wonderful home and mortgage free to boot!

Today, I fabricated a little bushing for the mill and setup the last flanged manifold fitting for facing. I also fabricated a mounting plate so can hold the fittings securely in the bench vice while I have at it with the emery cloth etc.

Next step is to counterbore all the fittings for the 1.75" dia. pipe.
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  #159  
Old 08-19-2014, 09:27:49 PM
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

THE PERILS OF REVERSE ENGINEERING

So awhile ago back in post #37 I talked about hand fitting the lifter guides and waxed poetically about the long defunct Smith & Marbley Simplex Automobile plant and the craftsmanship of the "Fitter".

Well... while an automobile or machine or engine (as in this case) that was assembled by methods that eschewed mass production techniques tends to denote quality it can be a pain in the patooty for those of us having to perform some level of reverse engineering.

Take my intake manifold for instance.. now I have had those castings on hand for quite a while. Over the past week or so I went to work on them - I fabricated a fixture to mill the flanges and to do the counter bore. I even made a boring tool for the counter bores. (pat on back!). Anyway, I finished the first of the elbows last night - drilled the bolt holes to final size (I had drilled and tapped undersize so I could attached the piece to the fixture) and spot faced it.

Grinning like a hound dog eating hornets I offered up the piece to one of the cylinder blocks only to discover that the studs on that particular block (cylinders 3 & 4 - figuring they were all the same) were bored out of horizontal alignment with the raised boss and port by a significant amount! However, the other two blocks (where the elbows actually go) are fine. But I will have to offset the holes for the Tee casting. Glad I found that out before I finished machining that particular piece!

Since all the cylinders are identical castings you would think that the same setup, fixture or whatever was used to locate the studs. Product of hand fitted parts? Who knows. But it just highlights to me that in this day and age we (me in particular) may take for granted precision machine practices. So much for parts interchangeability. Oh well, those miss-aligned studs will only add character.

Here is a photo (albeit a very bad and old photo) showing the miss-aligned studs and those funky springs - which have been replaced - makes me appreciate the progress I have made



Best regards,

Terry
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Old 08-27-2014, 10:04:37 PM
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

So to follow-up on my post concerning the not-quite-right intake manifold studs here is a much better photo of the cylinder block and offending studs.

Note the punch makes made way back in the day... you can see them in the boss for the valve ports indicating that this block contains cylinders 3 & 4 and just to make sure there is no confusion about were cylinders 3 & 4 are in relation to 1, 2, 5 & 6 note the two punch marks indicating that it's the 2nd cylinder block. (LOL)



Now that the elbows and tees are milled and counter bored its time to think about those funky combination tees'/elbow castings. You can see them here with the conventional elbows and tees as cast.




I think what I am going to do is make a fixture to hold them on the cross slide of the lathe. Then I can counter bore two of the ends (with my homemade boring head) rotate 180 and do the final end. (suggestions welcome) Once counter bored and polished I can silver solder the whole assembly together and cross the completed intake manifold off the "Parts-I-was-told-were-impossible-to-make" list.

Tonight, while I tossed that around in my head.... I started fabricating the pilot for the valve seat grinder.

Best regards,

Terry
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