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Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log


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  #161  
Old 09-03-2014, 08:42:58 PM
tharper tharper is offline
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Having "Thunk" hard about it this is my idea for a fixture to hold the intake manifold Tee/Elbow combo fitting. A bar extending across the top will hold the piece in place.

The fixture will mount on the cross slide of my lathe so I can counterbore the ends 1.75" dia. x .5" deep.



As a "newbie" I am constantly amazed at how much work is involved in making a fixture to facilitate all of 5 minutes of machine work. I guess that's where the patience part comes in!

I also finished the pilot for the valve seat grinder and now I am just waiting for the UPS truck to deliver a new 2-5/8" stone.



Best regards,

Terry
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Old 09-06-2014, 06:54:51 PM
tharper tharper is offline
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

After spending most of the afternoon making a batch of blackberry jam and one of Plum jam (yum!) I had a chance to head out to the garage and break open one of the crates of engine parts. It was just like Christmas - well... a Christmas when you send yourself presents... but who cares! It was still fun!

I have been worried about corrosion since the crates have been stored in an un-heated space that has undergone some rather extreme humidity and temperature fluctuations. Big sigh of relief when I cracked open the crate and everything was just the way it should be.



If the cams look rather black they are - I left the original grungy oil on figuring if it had kept them from rusting for over 70 years than they would be fine for a few more. Just to put things in perspective the cams are almost 5 ft. long. You can see the hefty brass bearings. These are held in the crankcase web with big set-screws. Packed around the cams is a bonanza of other parts.

Anyway, I had to get to the exhaust cam because I needed to fit it up. You see sometime after I acquired the engine from Don he gave me a gear and shaft for the oil pump drive. Unfortunately all that remained of the oil pump drive gear case (part no. B1B) was a fragment of the lower edge and the packing nut. As you may recall from way back I talked about how I made a pattern for it and now have a nice casting in hand. Not having a lot to go by I have been worried about the fit-up - how the gears will mesh etc.

Since I have a 3D printer in my classroom I decided to print-off a mock-up to test how it would all go together. The gear and it retaining ring fit just perfect and I had a length of scrap shaft that was just the right diameter.



Unfortunately I wasn't able to fit up the cam to test the mock-up. That will have to wait for a nice dry day when I can drag some stuff out of the garage.
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  #163  
Old 09-20-2014, 07:23:25 AM
tharper tharper is offline
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Since frost has killed the garden and we are out for harvest break I can spend more time in the shop. Today I fitted-up the exhaust cam to see how the drive gears for the oil pump interfaced using my 3D printed gear housing. It all works! (I love it when a plan comes together.) Now I can machine
the bronze casting knowing that I have the dimensions right.

But.... before I do that I need to stay on task and finish the valve seats. A new stone is in hand and all faced. I also found in the crates the keepers for the valve springs so I can install the valves after they are lapped. Then... it's back to the intake manifold castings. I really want to get the manifold assembled - It's been one of my major milestones.

I have also been giving thought to the main's These are big bronze backed Babbitt shells. I am thinking of building a mold that uses quarter round strips (brass) silver soldered to the core to form the oil grooves. (that would save cutting them by hand. A while back I came across info on a South Bend Lathe attachement for boring bearings. I have yet to see one offered on Ebay or anywhere else but... in my ever optimistic mind I don't see why I couldn't build a similar rig. My only real worry is the worn ways on my lathe. I compensate when turning shafts etc. by offsetting the tailstock but boring a piece mounted to the cross slide would be different matter.https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-5...2520Attach.jpg

[IMG][/IMG]

Best regards,

Terry

---------- Post added at 07:23 AM ---------- Previous post was at 07:21 AM ----------

Well.... kind of messed that up...

Here is the photo

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  #164  
Old 09-20-2014, 11:18:08 AM
Dustin D Ehli Dustin D Ehli is online now
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Been watching since you started on this beast (been a while now)
Cant wait for that moment when you post a video of it finally coming alive.
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  #165  
Old 09-22-2014, 09:39:29 AM
tharper tharper is offline
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

This morning I found myself with a bit of time so I decided to start grinding valve seats
and lapping them in.

Previously I had made a custom pilot to ensure that the seats were concentric with the new valve guides.
I dressed the stone to a 46 degree angle. The valves were cut to 45 degrees.

After grinding the seats (some more than others) I lightly lapped the valves. From research and talking with others
I found that the natural human inclination is to think that more lap is better but... the reality is this can create problems.
In fact when I examined the old seats this was quite apparent.Countless lapping sessions and no-doubt little effort to restore somewhat of an appropriate angle on the seats had left concave rings in the seat.

All this was a result of the very frequent need to do a "valve job" on these old engines back in the day due to poor fuel, poor efficiency and other impurities.The exhaust seats were the worse - they have been cut very deep.

Anyway, four valves are done I am going to redress the stone than hopefully tackle the others soon.

Here is the pilot in place




A Lapped valve


The valves are a stainless bi-alloy (heads are a different alloy than the stems) and were meant for a prime mover in a GE locomotive.



Best regards,

Terry
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  #166  
Old 10-23-2014, 04:30:39 PM
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Milestone alert.... Milestone alert!

After 81 years the Big Wisconsin is sporting a complete, functional, set of valves as
opposed to those embarrassing bent slinky, pretzel things it suffered with for so many decades.
Special thanks to Don for scrounging enough original springs, Jean for machining the new guides (pre-lathe days),
Joe for entrusting me with the use of his valve seat grinder and all the fine folks here who have
provided encouragement and advise born of experience.




Here is a nostalgic view of the before:


Other than installing new studs and fabricating new high crown bolts for the top covers,
I can now set the cylinder blocks aside and concentrate on other pieces.

Best regards,

Terry
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  #167  
Old 10-23-2014, 06:38:08 PM
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Looking good can't wait for a video of it
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  #168  
Old 10-23-2014, 06:47:47 PM
Sean Keys Sean Keys is offline
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

That's way cool!! Great progress!!
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  #169  
Old 12-06-2014, 07:12:01 PM
tharper tharper is offline
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

This past week the 3D printer and I came to a truce. It would print and I would quit doing dumb A@#$% things that made it not print.

Anyway, here is the end result. Track pads for a Lombard of course! Hopefully once the rest of the assembly is complete I will have a nice display for my classroom.



Last month I had a moment to swing by the Maine State Museum in Augusta. I consider the museum to be one of the great hidden treasures of Maine and a MUST stop. Anyway, last year my students created a set of plans which a Building Trades student used to fabricate a tool box for the museums Lombard tractor.

Here is the tool box installed:


I also took a day off from deer hunting to go on a Lombard hunt. We didn't find one of the elusive beast but we did find an old shingle mill site and introduced my daughter to the joys of these crazy expeditions.


And.... before I forget
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  #170  
Old 01-18-2015, 08:54:26 PM
tharper tharper is offline
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Yesterday I worked on fabricating the oil level gauge body. (Part No. J4J) This screws into the top of the crankcase.

A brass rod supported by a float indicates whether or not you need to add to the five gallons of oil in the sump.

Its almost done... I am waiting for a new end mill to arrive so can mill a slot in the cap.That's one of the disadvantages of living in the hinterlands - I can't run in town and pickup what I need (heck, we don't even have a hardware store!) so mail order is the life blood of this project.

This is were it stands right now. I still have the cap to finish, smooth out a few glitches and cut the gauge glass. The piece is 5-1/4" overall. It came out O.K. but Its obvious I am still a novice on the mill.



Here is the photo of the original I used as a go-by.



Best regards,

Terry
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  #171  
Old 01-18-2015, 09:05:13 PM
con-rad con-rad is offline
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

This has been the most amazing restoration! how far the engine has come from it's original state of disrepair and damage is amazing and a true source of inspiration for us all. Good work and keep it up!

conrad
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  #172  
Old 01-19-2015, 07:02:44 AM
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Terry:

So, when can we expect to see a video of it running?

Excellent work on a difficult restoration.
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Old 01-19-2015, 05:54:23 PM
tharper tharper is offline
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Elden,

It will be awhile! Still have more parts to cast and then the big ticket job of doing the bearings.... but I am getting there!
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  #174  
Old 02-16-2015, 06:40:25 PM
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

The other day I finished (almost) the Oil Level Indicator Gauge. Previously I had ordered a length of 3/4" dia. gauge
glass from McMaster-Carr. Since I couldn't justify buying one of those neat chain type glass cutters I decided to try the
lathe method I saw on Youtube. So... I chucked it in the lathe, scored it nice and deep with the edge of a carbide tool then
put the torch to it....and waited.......and waited........and.... nothing. but on the video it just went "pop" and there it was!
Figures!! So... stupid me I decided if heat didn't work than cool might so I dribbled a bit of cold water on it... it went "Pop" alright -
all over the place!

With that fail burned into my frontal lobe I decided to try the score and snap method. That worked. It broke a bit ragged but a few minutes
with the grinder and it was looking pretty good. Then I noticed the 1/2" long crack. So I will have to try again.



Today I was determined to make some more progress so I braved near white-out conditions and howling winds to drive to the
next town over so I could pick-up some fasteners. With a quick fixture setup (using the said fasteners) I was able to bore the saddles for the fixture I am going to
use to hold two of the manifold castings. At first I tried using the boring head I just bought. However it was slow work so I setup the
DIY boring bar I made a while back. That did the trick! In no time the saddles were done.







Best regards,

Terry
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  #175  
Old 04-17-2015, 09:33:08 PM
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

During a recent (820 mile) pilgrimage to Don's Lombard Emporium I managed to convince him to loan me a spare governor that he had on hand. The Wisconsin PT used a type "P" Pharo Governor. Its mounted on the front timing cover and is driven via a right angle drive. A steel diaphragm activates a torque rod which extend back to a choke body situated between the intake manifold and the carb.




Typically (on the few engines that have survived) these are missing. No doubt due to that bronze right angle drive. The governor on my particular engine was present but the cast iron oil pot had been smashed.





Now the question is.... what is the best way to pull the bevel gear (without destroying it) so I can disassemble my unit? The problem I am seeing is the there is no flat surface to grip with the puller. Am I missing something?

On other front's the ice went out on the river (without flooding the town) and I managed to get the rest of the intake manifold pieces machined. Now I am working away polishing the castings. In a few weeks when the ground firms-up I will move the crankcase from the garage into the shop, fit up they cylinder blocks and start silver soldering the intake manifold together.

Got to love progress!

Best regards,

Terry
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  #176  
Old 09-14-2015, 05:05:36 PM
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Any updates on the project? I can't wait to see the rest.
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  #177  
Old 12-24-2015, 10:19:25 AM
tharper tharper is offline
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Photo Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Hello folks,

Its been awhile. I have not spent much time in the shop. I tend to call these periods of inactivity though in regards to this project it hasn't happened too often. That's not to say that nothing has been happening just not much hand-on.

However one hands-on included spending the day running the steam Lombard Log hauler at the Maine Forest & History museum. Completed in April 2014 following a 30 year restoration its a remarkable machine.

Here I am entering the exclusive and very small world of Lombard engineer:


Great people and a wonderful machine



Anyway... the last major items I need to locate are a starter and a generator.

The starter is a 12 volt Leece-neville 404M and the generator is a model 469G. Any help in locating these items or suitable replacements would be most welcome!








Best regards,

Terry Harper
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Old 12-28-2015, 08:54:47 PM
tharper tharper is offline
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With the Christmas festivities over I felt motivated to get back to work on the beast. First thing I needed to do at the behest of a fellow Wisconsin T-head fraternity member was verify the timing marks on the cam gears and uncover the marks on the flywheel - most of which I did not know existed!

Next task was work on the core box for the Lower Water manifold fitting (Part No. A29A)Up until now I have made all my core box masters from wood. Usually after fabricating a wood male master I glue it to a backer board, construct a wood frame and take a plaster cast of it. Given that these boxes will only be used for a couple of pour the durability factor is acceptable. If one gets damaged its easy enough to cast another.

This time I decided to apply the technology at my finger tips and 3D print the male masters. I thought about doing the whole box but given the quantity of material and time I decided to skip that.

How did it come out? I will let you know in about 20 hours! While we are waiting I am working on the pattern for the last of the lower water manifold fittings. Tapered and with a horizontal and a vertical bend this one is going to take some thinking in regards to part lines. What I do know is that this pattern and its follower will be 3D printed as well. At least that's the plan!

Here is a photo of the last fitting I need to do


Best regards,

Terry
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  #179  
Old 12-28-2015, 11:22:03 PM
Amax Amax is offline
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

I just happened across this thread and have read it all.

This is the sort of project that is just incredible. We are talking about hobbyists who take it upon themselves to restore important pieces of history. If it weren't for the 'regular folk' taking on projects like this, they would just not happen.

Kudos to the OP and to the many fellow hobbyists and aficionados who have supported him.

Again, a really wonderful thread, project and machine.
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  #180  
Old 12-29-2015, 07:25:16 PM
tharper tharper is offline
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Thanks Amax kind words of support are always welcome!

Today, here in God's country, we had a snow storm so I headed into the shop. It felt good to get back to work on the intake manifold castings. I believe they are just about ready for assembly. I just have to drill and spot face one fitting.

To finish the intake manifold I will need to temporarily install the cylinder blocks back on the crankcase - get it all aligned then silver solder it all together. Any suggestions for what would be a good silver solder to use? I figure with the heat, vibration and expansion and contraction silver solder as opposed to soft solder is the way to go.

Finishing these castings has been a long slow process - just to recap here are some photos of the major steps. I still find it hard to believe that with little to no experience doing this type of work, I have actually taken this from measurements to fabricating patterns & core boxes to fabricating fixtures to machining to the (nearly) finished assembly. Heck, when I started this project I had never run a lathe before in my life let alone a milling machine! I am proud but a little dumbfounded at the same time!






And last of all what the final product should look like.



Best regards,

Terry
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