Antique Tractors
[Home] - [HELP] - [Forums] - [Groups] - [Classified Ads] - [Subscribe] - [Books] - [Sponsors] -

Go Back   SmokStak > SmokStak® Old Iron and Tractor Community > Antique Steel Wheel Tractors - Old Iron Lugs and Cleats
Forgot Password? Join Us!

Notices

Antique Steel Wheel Tractors - Old Iron Lugs and Cleats Photos and information about antique steel wheeled farm tractors. This is where to find the heaviest of Old Iron tractors.

Antique Steel Wheel Tractors - Old Iron Lugs and Cleats

10' Steel Wheel Driver


this thread has 119 replies and has been viewed 37850 times

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #61  
Old 01-18-2008, 07:00:35 PM
Bruce Flatmoe Bruce Flatmoe is offline
Registered
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Burnsville, Minnesota USA
Posts: 262
Thanks: 1,303
Thanked 1,868 Times in 143 Posts
Default Re: 10' Steel Wheel Driver

We found a cross shaft with some gearing. Nothing else and there probably won't be much else.
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #62  
Old 01-21-2008, 06:51:29 PM
FWurth's Avatar
FWurth FWurth is offline
One Millionth Post
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Freeburg, Illinois, USA
Posts: 6,531
Thanks: 7,568
Thanked 6,048 Times in 3,103 Posts
Default Re: 10' Steel Wheel Driver


I would not be surprised if the engine survived the tractor as a power unit for another application. It could possibly be hiding somewhere on another farm. Once the picture from Farm Collector was posted dad remembered speaking to Clyde Hall when the article came out and the general concensus was that it most probably came from a Minneapolis/St. Paul area manufacturer. The similarities to the Transit Threasher have been noted. There are also couple of similarities to the Bull tractor in the gearing:

1) The rear gear is segmented.
2) The double flange on the end of the gear shaft, appears to be a roller pinion. Probably neccessary due to the amount of flex involved with such a large gear diameter, and most probably a major downfall due to the frequency of replacing the rollers.

The Bull tractor was designed by the same engineers as the Gas Traction Co.

Just some food for thought
Reply With Quote
  #63  
Old 01-21-2008, 06:57:46 PM
FWurth's Avatar
FWurth FWurth is offline
One Millionth Post
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Freeburg, Illinois, USA
Posts: 6,531
Thanks: 7,568
Thanked 6,048 Times in 3,103 Posts
Default Re: 10' Steel Wheel Driver

BTW

Dad remembers hearing from either John T., Bill K. or Harold O. that the original Transit Threasher tractor is still in existence in a museum in Canada. Does anyone know if it is still around? If so where at, any pictures? Or is dad having a senior moment?
Reply With Quote
  #64  
Old 01-21-2008, 11:33:12 PM
Brian Flatmoe Brian Flatmoe is offline
Registered
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Meadow, S. Dakota USA
Posts: 363
Thanks: 1,778
Thanked 1,238 Times in 189 Posts
Default Re: 10' Steel Wheel Driver

I just had a conversation on the phone with the man that sent the picture into the magazine that I posted earlier. He said he has a couple more pictures of this tractor from different views that he will copy and send me. When he does I'll try to post them.

Brian
Reply With Quote
  #65  
Old 01-22-2008, 12:06:05 AM
Bruce Flatmoe Bruce Flatmoe is offline
Registered
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Burnsville, Minnesota USA
Posts: 262
Thanks: 1,303
Thanked 1,868 Times in 143 Posts
Default Re: 10' Steel Wheel Driver

There is a 25 hp Gas Traction at Reynolds that is being restored. The engine has some different features to it such as curved tops to the hand hole covers. I am sure there are other differences as well.
Reply With Quote
  #66  
Old 01-23-2008, 01:18:22 PM
Jerry Toews Jerry Toews is offline
Registered
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Goessel, Kansas
Posts: 30
Thanks: 25
Thanked 287 Times in 20 Posts
Default Re: 10' Steel Wheel Driver

BRUCE, it has been with GREAT interest that I have been following the threads about the large steel wheel and miscellanous parts that you recently found. It has been interesting to see how the speculation has evolved as to what it came off of. While the speculation and article that your father found seems to point to an early experimental Big 4, PLEASE allow this "old timer" to be bold enough to offer yet another possibility.
As you well know there have been many gas tractor books that attempt to show real photographs or at least artists' conceptions of how most of the early Gas Tractors looked. These books offer whatever is known about each of the hundreds of tractors that were produced. Some of these never got past the design and promotional stage. For some of these early companies, a tractor was designed and some literature was printed. Salesmen were sent out to try and fleece money out of honest farmers who were looking for ways to cut the drudgery out of everyday farming at the turn of the century. For some of these early companies, they managed to get no more than one tractor built. Many of these companies had very little financial backing and their hopes of getting rich overnight were dashed when their first prototype attempted to put a plow in the ground.
During the final years of the 1800's and the early 1900's, a number of companies were experimenting with making a tractor around a gas engine. Steam was king and the large steam plowing engines were massive chunks of iron and steel. The same design thinking was used in the first gas tractors. Some of the very first tractors were large single cylinder engines on no more than a steel running gear.
One such company was the Maytag Company of Newton, Iowa. Most of us usually think of the little single cylinder washing machine engine when we hear the name Maytag. Very few of us have heard of the early experimenting that went on at the old Maytag plant in 1901 and 1902. Hoping to capture the large tractor plowing market, founder Bartholemew Advance Increase Maytag began experimenting with a gigantic tractor. He designed a single cylinder, air cooled, two cycle gas engine mounted on a massive steel wheeled frame that he called the 80-150 Maytag Giant. The tractor matched up to its name. The piston was 19 inches in diameter with the machined crankshaft providing a incredible 32 inch stroke. The crankshaft diameter was 8 inches and at one end of the crankshaft was a massive 12 foot flywheel with large fins in it to provide the cooling air for the huge cylinder.
Due to the massive diameter of the flywheel, 10' 2' rear drivers were necessary so that the flywheel would clear the ground. Several design flaws were inherent in this experimental tractor. One of the greatest problems that Bartholemew encountered was the starting of this large engine. The ratcheting kick pedal was 10 feet long and extended nearly 17 feet above the ground. A 2000 lb. block of iron, harnessed in an angle iron framework; was pulled up to the top of the angle iron framework by a series of ratcheting pulleys and cables. When the operator was ready to start the engine a large pin was pulled which released the 2000 lb. block of iron. As the block accelerated down by the gravitational forces acting upon it; the iron block commenced to make contact with the large kick pedal; pushing it down and thus rotating the engine. IF the fuel mixture was correct the massive engine sprang to life.
Once the engine was running; another design flaw was experienced by the hurricane force winds which were set up by the massive cooling fins in the large flywheel. While plowing wheat stubble at the Maytag experimental field, 4 1/2 miles north of Newton, Iowa in 1902, the 80-150 Maytag Giant back-fired and sparks from the exhaust landed in the stubble at the side of the tractor. The tremendous wind currents fanned the sparks into a ferocious blaze. As you well know, fire fighting equipment and communications in 1902 left a little to be desired. By the time the neighboring farmer got into town to sound the alarm; the fire was completely out of control. The City of Newton, Iowa sent out their big new "chemical wagon" pulled by 6 beautiful black percheron horses. The wind forces in the area were so great, that the horses were never able to get near the fire. The fire finally burned itself out near the Iowa River. Fire damage was extensive in central Iowa that fatal day. Even with the finest marketing skills of Maytags' outstanding sales force; they never were able to overcome the negative publicity that this event caused. It took nearly 16 years for people to forgive and forget. Bartholemew had tried the BIG tractor market and failed. Still having a quizical mind he resigned himself to think smaller. In later years his energies were turned to designing a similar but much smaller air cooled single cylinder, two cycle engine. He soon added a washing machine to the engine. From these humble beginnings sprang forth the giant washing machine company that we know today.
I don't remember which year it was, but I think it was the second year for the Waukee, Iowa Swap Meet I set up as a dealer. There were only about 20 dealers set up around the flag pole on the hill that second year. It rained just like it has most years. I was set up next to an old man who used to work at the Maytag Plant in Newton, Iowa. He had a box of old papers and Maytag manuals that he had salvaged out of the trash one day when Maytag was cleaning up. He wanted $5 for the box and no one so much as looked at the box the entire swap meet. Saturday night we were sitting around eating crackers and cheese and drinking Old Milwaukee beer. As we were telling stories, he offered me the entire box of old Maytag paper for $1. After much deliberation I gave the old fellow a dollar for the box. I brought the box home and put it in the attic above my shop because no one had interest in old Maytag stuff in those days. About a year ago when I was cleaning up I went thru the box and found the personal diary of Bartholemew Advance Increase Maytag. The little information that I have came from his scribblings in this old diary.
No pictures of this tractor have survived to my knowledge and very little is known about it. Bruce, the wheel and miscellaneous parts you have found COULD possibly be some of the remains of this old 80-150 Maytag Giant. Thru the use of SmokStax we can continue to help preserve history. IF any of you out there have any more details of the 80-150 Maytag Giant, please help set history straight. We MUST pass this great history on to the younger generation. Respectfully Submitted, Jerry Toews, Goessel, Kansas
Reply With Quote
  #67  
Old 01-23-2008, 02:34:42 PM
Bruce Flatmoe Bruce Flatmoe is offline
Registered
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Burnsville, Minnesota USA
Posts: 262
Thanks: 1,303
Thanked 1,868 Times in 143 Posts
Default Re: 10' Steel Wheel Driver

Thanks Jerry! Your comments were GREAT! There are two more pictures being sent to Brian from the guy in Washington State. One picture shows the tractor from the rear and another picture possibly shows two of the same large tractors. Supposedly on the back of one picture is written "110 hp". We are anxiously awaiting the pictures and will post them upon arrival!!!
Reply With Quote
  #68  
Old 01-23-2008, 03:29:48 PM
Jerry Toews Jerry Toews is offline
Registered
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Goessel, Kansas
Posts: 30
Thanks: 25
Thanked 287 Times in 20 Posts
Default Re: 10' Steel Wheel Driver

THANKS Bruce. My memory is not too good anymore; but years ago I was asked to display our Big 4 Tractor at the Kansas State Fair. During the fair one day this old gentleman came up to and said, "You know back in the 40's the FFA Club at our high school scrapped out a Big 4 on my place for the war effort. I immediately got quite excited and asked if any parts might still be laying around. He said the the rear hubs and a few other odds and ends were still laying around. Well, I got his name and drove out to see him. It was way up north on the Kansas Nebraska line. When I got there I bought whatever was left that had not been taken in. On the same yard he showed me a massive steel wheel. As I remember it was 10'2" in diameter. He said that they used this wheel for a water tank when he was younger and could not remember where it came from. This was MANY years ago and the old fellow is probably not living anymore. I did not keep his name, but could probably get within 10 miles of the place. I do NOT remember an internal gear like your wheel has. Jerry Toews, Goessel, Kansas
Reply With Quote
  #69  
Old 01-24-2008, 01:12:09 AM
Phil Johnson's Avatar
Phil Johnson Phil Johnson is offline
Sponsor
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Tofield, Alberta, Canada
Posts: 2,054
Thanks: 6,040
Thanked 3,677 Times in 1,153 Posts
Default Re: 10' Steel Wheel Driver

Keep digging, guys. This story gets more fascinating every week!!
Reply With Quote
  #70  
Old 01-24-2008, 11:52:04 AM
John Merry John Merry is offline
Subscriber
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: Washington, USA
Posts: 725
Thanks: 1,226
Thanked 952 Times in 225 Posts
Default Re: 10' Steel Wheel Driver

Thanks Jerry- Your post is a great visual of what the monstrosity looked like. I can just imagine the awful noise coming out of a Maytag engine with a 19" cylinder bore! lol
Reply With Quote
  #71  
Old 01-24-2008, 12:42:00 PM
Engine Whisperer Engine Whisperer is offline
Defective Email Address
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Kenesaw, Nebraska, USA
Posts: 1,362
Thanks: 1,079
Thanked 1,008 Times in 417 Posts
Default Re: 10' Steel Wheel Driver

My brother-in-law's father in IA has told me stories about this Maytag Giant of which Jerry speaks, and it must have truly been a behemoth. His father was reportedly on the crew gathering shocks to feed the two 32inch Case threshers it was pulling. But his version of the fire differs, he claimed the fire was started while refueling, some fuel had spilled while the crew was inverting the 110 gallon crock and ignited. Maybe it was a different fire?
Reply With Quote
  #72  
Old 01-24-2008, 01:25:35 PM
Kevin O. Pulver Kevin O. Pulver is offline
Email NOT Working
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Kenesaw, Nebraska USA
Posts: 4,256
Thanks: 1,195
Thanked 1,962 Times in 1,200 Posts
Default Re: 10' Steel Wheel Driver

Maybe both versions are correct. Maybe the men spilt fuel and a backfire ignited the fuel which in turn ignited the trash. However I can't imagine a 110 gallon crock nor why they would invert it rather than pump the fuel in...
I KNOW! It was probably a "fruit jar" Maytag Giant! Kevin
Reply With Quote
  #73  
Old 01-24-2008, 01:56:24 PM
Grape Grape is offline
Subscriber
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Menomonie, Wisconsin
Posts: 746
Thanks: 223
Thanked 812 Times in 274 Posts
Default Re: 10' Steel Wheel Driver

I wonder how much other neat stuff is buried around the country waiting to be found.
My Uncle bought a farm north of Eau Claire WI that used to have a huge steam sawmill that burned in the early 1900's. Rumor has it that the pit the flywheel ran in was 24 feet deep so that makes for a big engine. Nothing left there but a field now but I'm thinking I'd like to take the money the government wants to give us all to jump start the economy and buy a good metal detector and check that field out this summer. Maybe there are a few things left around there too.
Thanks for the photos
__________________
Phil Grape
Remember, to Belittle others is to Be Little yourself
Reply With Quote
  #74  
Old 01-24-2008, 04:46:43 PM
Marcel P's Avatar
Marcel P Marcel P is offline
Subscriber
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Belgium
Posts: 742
Thanks: 3,701
Thanked 1,396 Times in 340 Posts
Default Re: 10' Steel Wheel Driver

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerry Toews View Post
The City of Newton, Iowa sent out their big new "chemical wagon" pulled by 6 beautiful black percheron horses.
What an amazing story! Imagine what could happen if the ignition was set too early when starting

The percheron is a typical French horse, around 1900 thousands of percherons were exported to the US. There is even a tractor named after the percheron horse.

Thanks for sharing
Marcel
Reply With Quote
  #75  
Old 01-24-2008, 06:31:47 PM
FWurth's Avatar
FWurth FWurth is offline
One Millionth Post
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Freeburg, Illinois, USA
Posts: 6,531
Thanks: 7,568
Thanked 6,048 Times in 3,103 Posts
Default Re: 10' Steel Wheel Driver

I think Ben Hadd's family keeps getting bigger! I wonder where he invested the dollar he got for his box of stuff .
Reply With Quote
  #76  
Old 01-25-2008, 01:56:23 PM
Jerry Toews Jerry Toews is offline
Registered
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Goessel, Kansas
Posts: 30
Thanks: 25
Thanked 287 Times in 20 Posts
Default Re: 10' Steel Wheel Driver

Bruce, my first post about the 80-150 was a bit windy; HOWEVER, the second post about the large steel wheel in northern Kansas is a fact. It seems like we should try and locate it again. Jerry
Reply With Quote
  #77  
Old 01-30-2008, 12:51:35 PM
Russ Hamm's Avatar
Russ Hamm Russ Hamm is offline
Subscriber
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Canton, Kansas, USA
Posts: 1,768
Thanks: 1,289
Thanked 3,025 Times in 985 Posts
Default Re: 10' Steel Wheel Driver

Now Jerry!!! Iv'e never known you to be windy. LOL.
Reply With Quote
  #78  
Old 01-30-2008, 08:55:29 PM
Brian Flatmoe Brian Flatmoe is offline
Registered
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Meadow, S. Dakota USA
Posts: 363
Thanks: 1,778
Thanked 1,238 Times in 189 Posts
Default Re: 10' Steel Wheel Driver

I received some more pictures of this tractor today. Amazing there were more than one of these giants. Hope you can see the pictures okay as they are copies of copies. Enjoy!

Brian
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	giant tractor1.jpg
Views:	850
Size:	47.1 KB
ID:	28806   Click image for larger version

Name:	giant tractor 2.jpg
Views:	893
Size:	60.4 KB
ID:	28807   Click image for larger version

Name:	giant tractor 3.jpg
Views:	1335
Size:	60.6 KB
ID:	28808  
Reply With Quote
  #79  
Old 01-30-2008, 11:47:29 PM
Mike McKnight Mike McKnight is offline
Registered
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Mason, Tennessee USA
Posts: 6,581
Thanks: 7,197
Thanked 6,609 Times in 2,428 Posts
Thumbs up Re: 10' Steel Wheel Driver

Brian,
Thanks for the AWESOME pictures! Those things are freakin' HUGE!!!!! You'd definitely be top dawg at any show with one of them.

Mike
Reply With Quote
  #80  
Old 01-31-2008, 12:05:41 AM
Phil Johnson's Avatar
Phil Johnson Phil Johnson is offline
Sponsor
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Tofield, Alberta, Canada
Posts: 2,054
Thanks: 6,040
Thanked 3,677 Times in 1,153 Posts
Default Re: 10' Steel Wheel Driver

Probably none survived of the few built. How would you hide something that size!!
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

F o r u m Jump

Similar Threads Chosen at Random
Thread Thread Starter F o r u m Replies Last Post
What should I do with this Steel Wheel? High Voltage Antique Steel Wheel Tractors - Old Iron Lugs and Cleats 9 12-15-2016 08:56:46 PM
Steel Wheel Cultivator ID darrin Farm Antiques and Collectibles 4 04-26-2015 08:12:49 PM
Steel wheel identity Dan thomas Antique Steel Wheel Tractors - Old Iron Lugs and Cleats 9 03-17-2014 12:11:44 AM
Big steel wheel what should I do with it. Chances R Antique Steel Wheel Tractors - Old Iron Lugs and Cleats 18 03-24-2009 03:26:23 PM
Steel wheel rings Alltractorman Antique Steel Wheel Tractors - Old Iron Lugs and Cleats 3 02-27-2006 09:33:33 PM


Use "Ctrl" mouse wheel to change screen size.
All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:25:45 AM.

Smokstak and Enginads site search!


All use is subject to our TERMS OF SERVICE
SMOKSTAK® is a Registered Trade Mark - A Community of Antique Engine Enthusiasts
Copyright © 2000 - 2019 by Harry Matthews P.O. Box 5612 - Sarasota, FL 34277