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Hit & Miss Gas Engine Discussion

Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log


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  #21  
Old 02-04-2011, 08:25:17 PM
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Thanks for the explanation and the patent pics,that helped a lot. I've never seen a setup like that, but looking at it, it looks like it would have worked prety good.
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Old 02-06-2011, 06:56:42 PM
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Yesterday we managed to focus on machining the new valves. Well for a few hours at least until the furnace pooped out!

These are new oversize bi-metal stainless alloy valves I got through Carl Cummings Machine. They are gorgeous valves! The alloy for the head is diffrent from the alloy for the stem though they are made all of one piece. The stems are .557" dia with a 2.95" dia. heads.

The original valves have .50" dia stems and 2.60" heads. Previously we had reamed the new cast iron valves guided .502" Now we are contemplating a change of plans.

Turning down the heads isn't a problem though its tough stuff and a carbide tool is a must. Even then I was only able to take 10 thou. per cut. The stems are much easier to cut. However the tought of turning those long stems to .50" and maintaining concentricity has me a bit concerned plus the time it will take.

So..... the plan is to turn the heads but leave the stems at
.557" and bore and ream the guides out to .559". We will have to turn a portion of the stem to .50" to accomidate the keepers.

Whats the old saying?....a battle plan is only good until the first shots are fired?
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  #23  
Old 02-12-2011, 06:59:12 PM
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Photo Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Today the project took a big leap forward.

I bought a big old South Bend lath. Now I won't have to mooch lathe time and can work on my own schedule once she's up and running.

I always say that my various projects justify the purchase of new tools - but this took it to extremes

Here is a photo of it at home in the "Man Cave"

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  #24  
Old 02-12-2011, 09:14:38 PM
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Atta Boy. It looks like it has most of the attachments. Now you can make lots of swarf.
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  #25  
Old 03-30-2011, 07:39:49 PM
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Well its been awhile since I posted an up-date. Finally the lathe is up and running. I had to swap out the 3 phase 440motor for a single phase 220, replace the spindle bearing capillary wicks and get anchored down, leveled and all trimmed-up. Runs like a champ

First project was turning a dummy valve guide. This matches the new guides in length but is a very light press fit. Inserting it into the valve guide bores I was able to check the projection of the old valves stems by inserting my one remaining original valve. Like many old engines, the valves were ground many, many times and each valve seat gave a diffrent reading. I measured all 12 and took the average.

Next, I will bore the dummy guide out to accept the new valve stems, insert one and take the average projection. This will be used to set the length of the new valve stem and the location of the keeper slots. It will also serve to check that the much larger flare of the new valves will not interfere with the top of the guide.

Below is the dummy after turning


The dummy guide and a new valve guide


Measuring the stem length
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  #26  
Old 06-20-2011, 05:09:54 PM
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Well its been awhile since my last update. Progress has been a bit halting. I got distracted by my latest project - the 1929 Franklin engine. But.....I have made a bit of progress on the Wisconsin..

Now that the old South Bend is anchored, cleaned, trued and ready to go I started in again on the valves - here after turning. Next I will turn the keeper slots and cut to length. ONLY 10 MORE TO GO!!




I have also been working on the manifold patterns a bit. Below is the core box for one of the tees. Since I won't be casting a lot of these I used P.O.P. (Plaster of Paris) for it. Also below is the simple pattern I used to cast it from.



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  #27  
Old 06-29-2011, 08:25:40 PM
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Photo Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Today I got a bit bored at the office so I decided to work on the artwork for the builders plate for this big beast. This will be acid etched onto 1/16" brass sheet and painted.

Don loaned me a builders plate from a later Wisconsin D3. Its nearly identical to the original (Don has one on his engine) with the exception of some of the text, so I was able to use it to get the fonts and match the text heights line weights etc.

I used Autocad to develop the artwork - the fancy Wisconsin banner was digitized from a period brochure.

I was so excited I had to do a color rendering to see what it would look like when the finished plate was done. The artwork I will use for the etching process is black and white.

Now to order the materials and get it done!

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  #28  
Old 06-29-2011, 09:16:04 PM
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

That is a big project that you got your hands into. I was wondering if you were going to pour your own castings. I have most of the components to make a small furnace but I haven't built it yet. I haven't seen too many pictorials or videos that show the process of making the sand mold that I can understand. I have the hardest time trying to understand how the top part of the sand mold doesn't fall out when it is lifted to remove the pattern and that powder keeps it from sticking to the bottom half. I for one would really appreciate it if you could take a couple of pictures or a video of how it's done if it isn't too much of a bother for you. You are doing a great job, thanks for taking the time to let us watch.
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  #29  
Old 06-30-2011, 08:17:31 AM
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Thanks for the complement Walt.

Iam cheating a bit......I will have someone else do the actual pouring of hot metal! Patterns & core boxes I can do but my experience with ramming-up the molds etc. is limited to a few hours in 6th grade shop class.

Here is a link that may help you...they have a great forum with lots of knowlegeable people who are more than willing to lend advise and coach those of us who are newbies along

http://www.backyardmetalcasting.com/
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  #30  
Old 07-02-2011, 08:32:58 AM
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Way back when I took apart the water pump I found the inside heavily incrusted and pitting.

A few minutes with the sand blaster took care of the former but what was left was a pitted and cratered surface that could have passed for a moonscape. Disheartened I set it aside for another day.

Last night I decided to give the cover a spin on the lathe. Fortunatly there was enough material to allow me to get a bit aggressive with it. Here is the results:



Unfortunatly not all the pitts were removed. The pitts on the face are of little concern but those on the raised boss that acts as the thrust bearing for the bronze impeller are an issue.

There are several things I can do:

1. turn it down further to remove the pits and compensate the increased clearance by machining down the mating surface with the pump body. (I have to do that to some extent anyway)

2. Weld the pits then machine (fear of warping the casting)

3. Leave as is and install a thin bronze thrust washer

4. machine the thrust bearing away and leave a shallow key. then pour the new babbitt shaft bearing long, then machine the projecting babbitt so it acts as the thrust bearing (radical but possible)

I am facing the same problem with the thrust bearing in the pump body.

For now I think I will set it aside and work on the new shaft for it.

There is so much to do on this project its easy to switch to anothe task when I get discouraged or bored with the one Iam doing
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  #31  
Old 07-02-2011, 09:47:51 AM
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

I don't think I'd worry about the pits on the surface except in the thrust area.

You might want to check on a version of Devcon or Belzona epoxies that are used for such purposes.

Take care - Elden
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  #32  
Old 07-15-2011, 01:56:31 PM
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Etched the new tag today. Mine is on the left. I etched the type, size and serial number rather than stamping it as the original. However I did miss-align some of the "stamped" numbers to look like they were stamped The blank one on the right is an extra.

Below is the battered original plate I used as a go-by to match text font etc. though some of the text was a bit diffrent on mine. (i.e. "Wisconsin Motor Corporation" v. "Wisconsin Motor MFG. Co."

Next is painting - the background will be black and the "Wisconsin" text will be red as it was originally.

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  #33  
Old 07-15-2011, 10:10:02 PM
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

nice job on those tags
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  #34  
Old 07-22-2011, 01:45:59 PM
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Recieved a care package in the mail today. A gentleman by the name of Ray Behner donated two sets of vintage spark plugs!

Six are Rentz. The other six are Firestone Panlonium (radioactive) I guess I wont be carrying those around in my pockets!

They say the difference between a restoration and a great restoration is in the details. Well this is one of those details that will make this engine standout.

Thank you Ray!!

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  #35  
Old 07-24-2011, 06:18:07 PM
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Here are the finished tags. Not perfect but they will do. Took awhile to develop a paint technique that worked. Next time I will etch it deeper.

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  #36  
Old 08-06-2011, 11:22:47 AM
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Luckly when I got this big beast Don gave me a complete set of 12 roller tappets and tappet guides.

The roller tappets are approx. 5-1/2" long and 1/2" in diameter. They run in phospher bronze guides. All the original guides had disapeared many, many years ago - thats why the valves were all bent - so they could get that shiney metal

Two of the roller tappets Don gave me were way past thier goodness date (i.e. badly corroded or bent in one case).

My friend Gene Bibber - a retired tool & die machinist, made replacements for me.

Here they are alongside an original and one of the guides. They just need some polishing and the pins pressed in.

These are a simple looking part but there is a heck of a lot of time into making these. They are bored all the way through, the top is dished and an oil return hole drilled at an angle to the center bore. They had to be heat treated as well.

Thanks Gene!

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  #37  
Old 08-09-2011, 04:47:18 PM
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

"The assembly line was a long wooden bench... An expert Fitter, a kind of man who has almost disapeared from our world, worked on each chassis..."

Now I appreciate what a "Fitter" was and did! Today I fitted the tappet guides to the crankcase. This engine is a fine example of the fitters art. Each piece was hand fit so no two pieces are identical. In 1925, when this engine was assembled, very few manufactures still relied on this exacting art. Mass assembly with dozens of hands pawing over an engine for mere seconds at a time at each stage of assembly was the rule of the day.

Since the tappet guides came from several diffrent engines each one had to be painstakingly fitted to the crankcase. It took over four hours of working with bluing, emery cloth and a fine mill file to get each one to fit correctly.

This was one of those time consuming fiddly jobs that you don't look forward to doing but then find out that it was very satisfying, relaxing and rewarding.



---------- Post added at 04:47 PM ---------- Previous post was at 04:32 PM ----------

Not sure where that jumping gripping smiley face came from? I DID enjoy fitting these!
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  #38  
Old 08-09-2011, 07:24:55 PM
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Terry,Nice job its keeping you out of mischief!! If you really clean the top of the pistons off you will find there Dia. stamped to the .001 each one is fitted to a specific cylinder ! Don
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  #39  
Old 08-12-2011, 05:27:05 PM
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Photo Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

For todays adventure..... I faced some 3/8"x24 grade 8 bolts for the adjusters on the tappets.

I also started tapping out new gaskets for the tappet guides. This is tedious work with a small ballpeen hammer and a brass punch. Calling the factory for a gasket set is not an option!

Many of the gaskets, such as those under the cylinders, were shellacked paper. I plan to do the same.




The old adjuster bolts were bent, cracked, well used and abused.

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Old 08-12-2011, 09:33:58 PM
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Almost forgot!

While I was etching a new tag for the engine I also etched a Lombard patent plate. Maybe....some day I will own a Lombard and have a dash to put it on!

I made two for my friend Don's Lombards and I donated another to the State Museum for their's. All three have the correct number etched into them.

The photo shows a bit of the process from the image of the original to the mirrored graphics to the finished plate.

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