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Hit & Miss Gas Engine Discussion Meet collectors of hit and miss engines, ask questions about collecting, restoring and showing antique flywheel engines.

Hit & Miss Gas Engine Discussion

Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log


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  #41  
Old 08-21-2011, 06:14:43 PM
tharper tharper is offline
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Photo Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Todays project....... I took a break from turning a new water pump shaft and went back to etching.

This time it was a face plate for a Boyce Moto-Meter. There is only one original that I know off and its on the Lombard in the State Museum.

Here is the original:


Here is the duplicate:


Hopefully, once I get this big engine complete, I plan to recreate the front clip and radiator of a Lombard to display it in. Thus the need for the proper moto-meter.

Now back to the water pump shaft!


T.
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  #42  
Old 08-23-2011, 03:59:45 PM
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Today's adventure.... was turning a new water pump shaft. The old shaft was heavily necked at the packing and corroded beyond salvage.

Here it is with the couplings and empeller fitted. I still need to cut the keys and cross drill it for the retaining pins. Then give it a final polishing.

Next I need to tackle the babbet bearing in the waterpump housing.

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  #43  
Old 08-29-2011, 04:35:39 PM
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For todays adventure...... I started parting-off the valve stems.

First I had to teach myself how to set-up the parting tool and how to grind it without inciting a fearsome "Parting tool event"

Parting tool rules I have learned:

1. Cut as close to the chuck/collet as possible

2. Make sure the top of the tool is set exactly at the center of the piece.

3. Keep the tool projection as short as possible

4. Clamp the tool holder in the tool post as close to the work piece as possible

5. Make sure the tool is perpendicular to the axis of work piece.

So far so good. I've got five valves done without incident

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  #44  
Old 08-31-2011, 08:43:35 AM
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Now for an exclusive look behind the scene.....

Just as your favorite TV show is a series of scripted, choreographed events so it is with restoring this monster. A drawing or "script" if you will, is created for each part.

Yes, I could draw quick hand sketches or in some cases even measure from a "go-by" part in hand as I perform the work. But my type AAAA+++ & OCD personality traits combined with decades spent in the design and engineering field wont allow me to do that.

I also beleive that all this info may help someone else at some point down the road.

Below are some samples of the drawing set I have put together. All the parts are numbered as per an original 1925 Lombard parts manual. (its that AAAA++ thing again!)

Sometimes I wonder if Iam making a new engine from a casting set or restoring an existing engine!



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  #45  
Old 09-07-2011, 08:21:52 PM
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Finally Iam getting near the end of the valve gear work!

Today I drilled amd reamed the new valve guides. Previously we had drilled and reamed them for .502" which was correct for the original valve stem size but because I couldn't find replacement valves the correct size I had to settle for valves with .557" stems.

So... I had to ream the guides out to .559". Previously I trimmed the guides back to clear the larger flair of the new valve. Next I need to press them in then paint the blocks

That leaves facing the ends of the valve stems with the tool post grinder and cutting the screwdriver slots in the valve heads.



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  #46  
Old 09-12-2011, 03:36:45 PM
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So today..... I took the valve port plugs for a spin on the lathe. Each of these weighs about 2 pounds.

The idea was to remove some of the 80 plus years of use and abuse. In particulat the nasty ridge around the hex hole.

There was no way I could remove all the blemish - nor do I want too. They all tell a tale - some known others not. In this case its countless removals of the port plugs to grind the valves back in the day when that was a choir that had to be performed far too often. In some cases that meant using a chisel to get a balky plug out

Its hard to see in the photo but I did not try for a mirror finish - fine tool marks were visible in the originals so I made sure to leave them as well.


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  #47  
Old 09-22-2011, 02:53:06 PM
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Todays task was cleaning up the castings for the valve shrouds. The originals shrouds were missing. Long ago Don had these cast when he was contemplating restoring the engine I am working on. Iam missing two and will have to have those cast.

My original intent was just a quick cleaning but the pattern was made from mahogany with an un-filled grain so all the shrouds had a interesting woodgrain effect!

Many T-head engines had exposed valve stems, springs etc. with no lubrication to the vave guides. Wisconsin provided for a minimal degree of lubrication by a light oil mist emitted through oil holes in the top of the tappets. The shrouds are supposed to contain the mist.

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  #48  
Old 09-30-2011, 02:28:43 PM
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With the valve gear complete I have been focusing on some of the little jobs which seem to be endless.....

Today I finshed cleaning-up and priming the new cylinder cover for cylinders 1 & 2 - part #5009 according to the Lombard parts manual. Of course that same manual says I can phone 235 and they will gladly ship my parts. Hmmm.... I guess they are having phone problems........

Anyway.... as you can see from the photo, someone decided a big hammer was more expediant than using a wrench to remove the bronze water pipe fitting. Fortunatly they used a chisle on the covers for cylinders 3 & 4 and 5 & 6 so I only had to remove the broken studs.

Fortunatly Don had a casting made many years ago and passed it on to me. A visit to the drill press and some sweat equity with a mill file and there we have it.... a new part.

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  #49  
Old 10-05-2011, 10:36:16 PM
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

any more neat updates this getting very very interesting
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  #50  
Old 10-19-2011, 05:49:35 PM
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Continuing on with the fiddley stuff theme..... Today I worked on the Primer Cup Studs (part no. L2L)

These are steel studs that screw into the top of the blocks and into the combustion chambers. 1/2" brass primer cups thread into the top.

Life had not treated these well. Three were missing and the surviving three are in real tough shape. All of them have the sheared-off ends of the primer cups stuck in them from when they were butally hacked-off to get the brass cups

I am turning the new studs from hex stock. I have drilled the end for the primer cup but Iam not going to tap the threads until I locate new cups and know for certain what the thread count should be.

Incidently, the original primer cups are 1/2" thread. I have only found 1/4" thread reproduction cups available. - May have to make an adaptor. Or...like nearly everything else....make my own!

One down - five more to go!




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  #51  
Old 10-20-2011, 03:49:50 AM
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

http://www.essexbrass.com/airc.htm. may work for you
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  #52  
Old 10-20-2011, 05:36:08 AM
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Thanks Ray!

Looks like they have a lot of neat goodies
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  #53  
Old 10-20-2011, 06:11:04 PM
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

They sure do. Time to figure out some "goods" to order and figure things out on their site.
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  #54  
Old 10-29-2011, 01:07:08 PM
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Photo Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

While multi-cylinder engines have a huge "Wow" factor - at least in my opinion - there is a price to pay for the "Wow.

In this case its having to make multiple copies of nearly every part. But there is a hidden benefit - after making six copies of something you get pretty good at it!

Here are the finished Primer Studs along side the surviving originals. The finished studs will get a final polishing followed by a coat of clear lacquer.

Yes, they are a bit bigger. I couldn't find the proper sized hex stock so I had to go with the next size up.




One thing I would like to point out is that I am a newbie to lathe work. In fact until I bought my lathe back in February my total time using a metal lathe was not more than couple of hours at most. Other the ocassional advise from friends and a bit of reading I have taught myself.

In short.....if I can do this you can too. Yes, I have had a few oops..but no big deal. Thow it in the scrap box and try again!

So whats next? Part no. A12A & A14A (front and rear bushings for the water pump)



I have put these off because at first I thought they were cast-in-place babbitt. However, studying the Lombard parts manual I realized they are pressed in bushings. A few minutes with a mallet and wood block and the fact was confirmed.

Now the plan is to turn a new set in bearing grade bronze. The originals are a babbitt material.
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Old 10-29-2011, 05:57:57 PM
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

You could make new and line them with babbitt so they will look original
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  #56  
Old 10-29-2011, 06:41:43 PM
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Hello Ray,

I thought about casting a babbitt rod and boring and machining it but with the packing nuts in place you will never see the bushings.
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Old 11-06-2011, 03:53:40 PM
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For yesterday's adventure.... I cut the woodruff keys on the water pump shaft using a friend's Bridgeport.

After that I visited Don and left with a few goodies.

Thanks to Don's generosity (and foresight in saving all this stuff ) I now have a complete set of exhaust castings as shown below. The long manifold in the background is the original as supplied by Wisconsin. The exhaust exited at the back of the engine and up through a conical blast pipe then up through a sheet metal shroud mounted on the hood - sort of like a steam locomotive blast pipe and petty coat.

Because of the distance between the cylinder blocks and the large cold spots in between, these original manifolds cracked often during cold weather use. In fact this one has been welded many times.

To fix this problem Lombard offered, and recommended individual pipes for each cylinder block. The 3" diameter pipes (yes....I said 3" dia. pipes) were welded into the castings.

The metal box on the complete pipe is a heat collector for the carb. Earlier, Don gave me a complete set of NOS exhaust gaskets.



Earlier I had mentioned the primer cups being threaded for 1/2" - here is a bad photo of one....Are these common to any other engine? The levers use to have wood pieces on them.



And last but not least... a 4 cylinder Wisconsin AC4 jumped int othe back of the truck..... now I am looking for the appropriate Wico mag.



Not a bad day!!
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Old 11-12-2011, 11:37:04 AM
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Over the past few days I have made an effort to address the dramatic emasculation of this old beast and restore some of its studliness...

So with that in mind I started making studs for it... a whole lot of them. When this engine was stripped for its brass and bronze almost every stud was sheared-off with a chisle. Fortunatly with its bronze crankcase i was able to work the majority of the broken-off pieces out with out much trouble.

Trying to find commercially available studs with the correct diameter, pitch and length was proving impossible.
So it was time to bring out the die set - purchased at a garage sale for $5.00 - and get to work.

A parting tool in the lathe made quick work of chunking out lengths of rod to be threaded.

So here we have 52 brand new 5/16"x24 and 3/8"x24 studs. I still have a few more to do for the intake and exhaust.

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Old 12-01-2011, 04:07:57 PM
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Today I finished the waterpump bushings. The original bushings were a press fit babbitt material. I deviated from the script and fabricated the new ones from 660 bronze. These are a very light press fit so I plan on sweat soldering them in to add a bit of security.

Now its time to paint and assemble the pump!

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Old 12-10-2011, 05:56:41 PM
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Well it took the remains of three smashed water pumps, making a new shaft, bushings and machining of the thrust bearings but now I finally have a complete water pump!

Next step is disassembly, prepping and painting and the addition of the grease cups and draincock.

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