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Trucks, Trailers and Hauling for Shows

Hauling across the water


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  #1  
Old 07-19-2007, 07:19:40 AM
SRMiller SRMiller is offline
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Default Hauling across the water

Would like to know , what is the best way to ship an engine across the water. Does it have to be taken apart?? And who does the shipping. Has anyone have any idea's???
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Old 07-19-2007, 12:04:39 PM
Ronald E. McClellan Ronald E. McClellan is online now
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Default Re: Hauling across the water

For items that are too heavy to pick up , you will have to package it then have it picked by a shipper who does shipping using containers. The private person can not just ship by container , it has to be done by a shipping co. You will have do some research-Yellow pages-google for freight companys. Ron
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Old 07-21-2007, 08:49:34 PM
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Default Re: Hauling across the water

The engine has to be crated. Shipping rates over water are determined by volume instead of weight. Getting the engine crated as small as possable might determine if it needs to be taken apart. Although keep in mind most (if not all) companies do charge for a minimum of space so taking something down into a small crate may not save you any $$$ at all. Crate will have to be fumigated unless it is made of treated materials and paperwork to back that up is a must.

Make sure the paperwork is filled out properly and completely. A Shipper's Letter of Instruction (SLI) freight quote and bill of sale are usually required. Make sure the proper export/import code is specified for customs. Stay away from describing the engine as antique or agricultural. "Industrial Engine" has suited my needs just fine to date.

YOU will be responsable for clearing customs as soon as a waybill is recieved from the shipper. YOU will also be responsable for contacting the freight house to see if your shippment has arrived and for collecting it before the free storage time limit runs out (7days most places.) Strongly suggest shipping port to port as overland trucking direct to/from your place can be very expen$ive.

Might sound like a big hassle, and it is to a point, but I've imported/exported engines a couple times with no problems that didn't work out in the end. Each time I made an informal import with US Customs and neither charged duty or required to have my cargo inspected. There is a wealth of info online, Google will be your new best friend here. Get several quotes, call the representing freight agent and make sure you understand quite clearly what services they will perform and what you will have to take care of yourself.

And last, be prepared for sticker shock when the final bill comes in (which has to be paid in full before your cargo is released) as the quoted freight price usually does not include additional fee$. You will pay for all paperwork transfer fees, harbor fees, x-ray fee, handling fee, security and fuel surcharges. All this BS can nearly equal what the sea freight charge is!
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Old 07-22-2007, 01:11:21 PM
SRMiller SRMiller is offline
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Default Re: Hauling across the water

Nick,
Thanks so much for the advice. You mentioned about staying away from describing the engine as antique. Do they charge more for this type of item??
I'm sure you have a good reason. Thanks again for the advice. Do you know about having an engine flown over. Would it be cheaper then having someone taking it apart ,crating it, then putting it back together once it is over there.??
Roger
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Old 07-25-2007, 07:24:22 PM
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Default Re: Hauling across the water

Quote:
Originally Posted by SRMiller View Post
You mentioned about staying away from describing the engine as antique. Do they charge more for this type of item??
Well they might, or the shipper might not want to handle it all due to liability. Customs will lick their chops when see antique and could charge duty on an item that listed differently would be duty free. Describing crate contents is one area where I try to be honest but vague. Remember what they don't know wont really hurt them. So far listing contents as used industrial engine has served all parties well.

I did have some engines sent via DHL air freight to Melbourne as I did not have an Australian importer's number and DHL would only ship by air in that case. Would of been nice if they told me that before..... Cost wasn't too dear but that was a couple yrs ago. Seafreight is definately cheaper plus you get hit with the fees no matter sea or air.

Again taking something apart, crating it then assembling at the destination depends on how big the engine is and what the shipper's minimum charge is. If the shipper's minimum freight charge is for 15cu ft, and your engine crated was 12cu ft, taking it apart and making it fit into 10cu ft will not save you any money. Hope that makes sense
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Old 08-05-2007, 05:13:00 PM
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Contaucreek Contaucreek is offline
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Default Re: Hauling across the water

I have imported several large rotary table surface grinders from the U.K. And want to give you a heads up on something. The shipping crate your stuff is in might be on the deck of the ship and subjected to salt spray for God knows how long.I always demand the shipper rustproof and wrap all equipment prior to crating.This comes from the experience of receiving the electrical panel for one and having corrosion on everything-what a mess .Whether shipping or receiving always keep this in mind for crated equipment.

Paul.
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