Antique Tractors
[Home] - [HELP] - [Forums] - [Groups] - [Classified Ads] - [Subscribe] - [Books] - [Sponsors] -

Go Back   SmokStak > SmokStak® Old Iron and Tractor Community > Antique Steel Wheel Tractors - Old Iron Lugs and Cleats
Forgot Password? Join Us!

Notices

Antique Steel Wheel Tractors - Old Iron Lugs and Cleats Photos and information about antique steel wheeled farm tractors. This is where to find the heaviest of Old Iron tractors.

Antique Steel Wheel Tractors - Old Iron Lugs and Cleats

Fordson Wehr Governor Oil Level + Trans Oil Questions


this thread has 33 replies and has been viewed 3597 times

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 04-09-2017, 10:55:42 AM
Nik M Nik M is offline
Registered-I
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Herndon, KS
Posts: 91
Thanks: 49
Thanked 70 Times in 31 Posts
Default Fordson Wehr Governor Oil Level + Trans Oil Questions

Does anyone know the type, weight, and amount or level of oil to use in an accessory Wehr governor on a Fordson F? It's the style in the attached image. There is a filler at the top and a drain screw on the other side, but I don't see a level plug. Do you just fill it to the top?

While I'm at it, I gather that I should use 600w steam cylinder oil in the rear end due to modern gear lubes being incompatible with bronze. Does anyone know the difference between Mobil 600w and Mobil 600w Super? It looks like Super might be a little higher in SAE equivalent viscosity, but beats me.

Thanks!
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Wehr Governor.jpg
Views:	418
Size:	45.2 KB
ID:	279681  
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Nik M For This Post:
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 04-09-2017, 08:54:24 PM
Ed Bezanson Ed Bezanson is offline
In Memory Of
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Waterford, Connecticut
Posts: 1,413
Thanks: 5,625
Thanked 4,872 Times in 946 Posts
Default Re: Fordson Wehr Governor Oil Level + Trans Oil Questions

Dear Nik I have just gotten 2 of these Governors one tagged Wehr and the other marked Apollo in a trade deal. I just went back down to the shop and took the Apollo apart to see what we are dealing with. That oiler cap on top is just for an occasional squirt of oil. Pic No 1 is a view of the Apollo governor. Pic No 2 is a look at the little oiler hole at the top of the unit. Last pic is a view inside governor showing the rear ball Bearing support and inside the 2 brass weights. The top oil hole leads to this rear bearing but I cant figure how the front bearing is lubed. I would like an accurate diagram of how yours hooks up to the carburetor or mixer.

As for the diff gear oil I believe the 600 is what is recommended but I have always used standard 90W Diff oil. Remember I only drive my Fordson's occasionally and never ask them to do any hard work and have never had any gear problems. Maybe Steve Welker or Butch Howe can chime in on the gear oil question. Ed B
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	P4090001.jpg
Views:	107
Size:	68.3 KB
ID:	279706   Click image for larger version

Name:	P4090003.jpg
Views:	124
Size:	70.7 KB
ID:	279707   Click image for larger version

Name:	P4090002.jpg
Views:	139
Size:	81.0 KB
ID:	279708   Click image for larger version

Name:	P4090005.jpg
Views:	132
Size:	72.5 KB
ID:	279709  
Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Ed Bezanson For This Post:
  #3  
Old 04-10-2017, 03:02:41 PM
Steve Welker Steve Welker is offline
Registered-I
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Gratz, Pennsylvania
Posts: 272
Thanks: 398
Thanked 767 Times in 215 Posts
Default Re: Fordson Wehr Governor Oil Level + Trans Oil Questions

Nik
On the Rear Gear oil, Like Ed said if just going to occasionally use for parades and such, regular gear oil would be fine. Worms gears have a lot of sliding friction compared to conventional spur gears. If not using a tractor to pull anything, a plain gear oil is OK as the Fordson worm gear is not seeing a great load moving around just the tractor. I would not use lighter than a ISO VG 460. EP (extreme pressure) gear oils are best for worms, but make sure that EP additive is not Sulfur based as that can cause problems with the bronze.

I do use a 600 series gear oil meant for bronze worm gears in mine as I do use my Fordsons for plowing and other work. The Mobil Steam Cylinder oil has special additives for use in the steam environment (water contamination) that is not necessarily needed in the rear end of a Fordson, but would work fine lubrication wise. I think the Super Steam Cylinder Oil is the heavier Viscosity.

What I would recommend is an EP oil with viscosity grade of a ISO VG 460 gear oil for light use and a ISO VG 680 for heavy use. Any lighter and the gears will be very noisy. Any heavier and the tractor will have a hard time moving itself under 50deg. Fahrenheit. Just make sure the oil is ok for Bronze Worm Gears and you will be fine. Mobil SHC 634 (ISO 460) and Mobil SHC 636 (ISO 680) are worm gear oils for heavy loaded bronze worm gear applications, but are quite expensive. For a tractor that is not being used everyday, you may be able to find a less expensive alternative by checking with a local oil distributor. Since these are not oils you will just pick up at Autozone, asking a rep. at a local oil distributor will be the best way to be able to find out what oil is OK with bronze worm gears, and be reasonable for price. A Fordson rear takes about 3 gallons.

-Steve
Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Steve Welker For This Post:
  #4  
Old 04-10-2017, 10:12:32 PM
Nik M Nik M is offline
Registered-I
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Herndon, KS
Posts: 91
Thanks: 49
Thanked 70 Times in 31 Posts
Default Re: Fordson Wehr Governor Oil Level + Trans Oil Questions

Ed, the Wehr advertisement says, "The case of the new Wehr governor is oil tight and all parts run in a bath of oil." So, I think that it must be intended to have a certain amount in the case. It wouldn't seem like the governor would function very well if it were brim full, though. I will take some detailed photos of my governor's hook up. I can't guarantee that it's correct, but it seems to work.

Steve, it looks like Mobil 600w is likely ISO VG 375 and Mobil 600w Super is ISO VG 460. I don't know if the original 600w was ISO VG 375, but if it was, Mobil 600w Super (ISO 460), Mobil SHC 634 (ISO 460), and Mobil SHC 636 (ISO 680) would all be heavier than intended. Obviously, you have about 10,000% more experience with Fordsons than I do, so I believe you that it works. It looks like Mobil 600w Super is way cheaper than the SHC 600 series, so maybe that's where I'll land. Really, it seems like any SAE 140 (ISO 460) that is yellow metal friendly should be okay. For that matter, SAE 85W-140 should work if it is yellow metal friendly. No? I guess what your saying is that EP oils are just better than regular SAE gear oil due to the worm gear sliding friction. The Mobil 600w and 600w Super don't actually say that they're EP, but they do list worm gears as an application.
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Nik M For This Post:
  #5  
Old 04-10-2017, 10:41:33 PM
Ed Bezanson Ed Bezanson is offline
In Memory Of
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Waterford, Connecticut
Posts: 1,413
Thanks: 5,625
Thanked 4,872 Times in 946 Posts
Default Re: Fordson Wehr Governor Oil Level + Trans Oil Questions

It is interesting that the add says they run in a bath of oil. When I took the unit apart there is no indication of any seals in the front but it is sealed with a plug at the rear. It was totally dry inside but it has been sitting in the weeds for 70 years. I guess a small amount of oil would keep the bearings lubed and not impede the action of the counter weights. When I get a chance I will open up the other unit and see if I can learn any more about these governors. Ed B
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Ed Bezanson For This Post:
  #6  
Old 04-11-2017, 11:51:55 AM
Steve Welker Steve Welker is offline
Registered-I
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Gratz, Pennsylvania
Posts: 272
Thanks: 398
Thanked 767 Times in 215 Posts
Default Re: Fordson Wehr Governor Oil Level + Trans Oil Questions

Nik,
I never remembered a Fordson manual specifically calling out 600w, so I looked back thru the different year manuals to see what was recommended.

Starting with the first 1917 manual the Oil specified for the transmission and rear is simply listed as Heavy Fluid Gear Oil. Pretty basic, opens it up for interpretation. First photo below.

By 1925 the specification changed to use the same oil as used in the engine! No specific weight, just a Saybolt Viscosity of 650 at 100deg. F. That is roughly equivalent to 90 weight gear oil, 40 weight engine oil, or an ISO VG 150. Quite thin! Second photo below.

By 1935 in a Sherman and Sheppard (Importers on the English model N Fordsons) Lubrication Manual the rear oil Specification gets a little more specific. It calls out a Mobiloil EP S.A.E. 160 for temps above 32deg. F. SAE 160 is not a common rating anymore, but in terms of viscosity, this is more like the ISO VG 680. Third Photo below.

Fourth Photo is a Viscosity chart showing comparison between different rating systems (SAE, ISO, AGMA, etc.)

Since there is not real major changes in the design of the transmission and final drive (minor bearing & ratio changes in trans, and worm was made finer) from 1917 to 1935, why the change in oil requirements? My belief is early on there was no real good unified system of oil grades, or at least none that farmers understood, so it was just as easy to list it as Heavy Fluid Gear Oil. The change to specifying engine oil was probably to make it simple for the farmers, one basic oil for the entire tractor. The final change to specifying an EP SAE 160 gear oil was probably because of excessive wear using the engine oil.

In conclusion, the Fordson rear end is not that picky. Anything from 40w engine oil to 160w gear oil had been specified from the factory. As long as you use something that won't harm the Bronze, you should be fine. SAE 140w should be fine. 85W-140 would probably be ok also as that is still better than 40w engine oil. If you go by the newest specification, an EP Gear OIL with a rating of ISO VG 680 (SAE 160) is the best, but this was assuming the tractor was going to be working hard. Just use something that won't harm Bronze. One side note, the thicker the transmission oil, the better the transmission input gears stop, making it easier to shift because the clutch is disengaging fully.

I never done it, but it would be interesting how adding something like STP or Lucas additive to 140w would work? Maybe bring it up closer to SAE 160w? I have 3 tractors I'm finishing up now, I may have to try something like this in one of them.

-Steve
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	1917 Oil.jpg
Views:	83
Size:	88.7 KB
ID:	279827   Click image for larger version

Name:	1925 Oil.jpg
Views:	90
Size:	161.5 KB
ID:	279828   Click image for larger version

Name:	1935 Oil.jpg
Views:	75
Size:	139.5 KB
ID:	279829   Click image for larger version

Name:	Viscosity Chart.jpg
Views:	84
Size:	59.7 KB
ID:	279830  
Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Steve Welker For This Post:
  #7  
Old 04-17-2017, 09:47:39 PM
Nik M Nik M is offline
Registered-I
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Herndon, KS
Posts: 91
Thanks: 49
Thanked 70 Times in 31 Posts
Default Re: Fordson Wehr Governor Oil Level + Trans Oil Questions

Ed, just a note that I haven't forgotten about the photos I promised. I'll get it done.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Nik M For This Post:
  #8  
Old 04-25-2017, 09:44:28 PM
Nik M Nik M is offline
Registered-I
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Herndon, KS
Posts: 91
Thanks: 49
Thanked 70 Times in 31 Posts
Default Re: Fordson Wehr Governor Oil Level + Trans Oil Questions

Ed, here are some photos of installation. Let me know if you need something different.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_1135 - Copy.jpg
Views:	126
Size:	108.6 KB
ID:	280899   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_1136 - Copy.jpg
Views:	115
Size:	73.7 KB
ID:	280900   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_1137 - Copy.jpg
Views:	125
Size:	119.3 KB
ID:	280901  
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 04-25-2017, 09:54:55 PM
Nik M Nik M is offline
Registered-I
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Herndon, KS
Posts: 91
Thanks: 49
Thanked 70 Times in 31 Posts
Default Re: Fordson Wehr Governor Oil Level + Trans Oil Questions

BTW, Ed and Steve, do either of you know why the timing adjustment rod support on my tractor has an extra support place? You can see it in two of the photos on the front head bolt. It's split, and one place supports the rod and the other is empty. Photos I've seen just have a shorter, full width timing adjustment rod support.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 04-25-2017, 10:31:35 PM
Ed Bezanson Ed Bezanson is offline
In Memory Of
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Waterford, Connecticut
Posts: 1,413
Thanks: 5,625
Thanked 4,872 Times in 946 Posts
Default Re: Fordson Wehr Governor Oil Level + Trans Oil Questions

Nik I have several of these linkages with that bracket in my storage area and I do not know what the second outer loop is for. I put mag drives on all my tractors but one of my rebuilt engines will be using the coil box timer system so I also want to understand what this extra support loop is for.
In asking the following questions I am assuming this tractor is a running unit so you can observe the action of the governor. That said , I can see that this is a fairly simple hookup to the governor but don't quite understand how it attaches to the mixer. Specifically what is that 2 bolt gray cylinder in the middle of Pic No 2. I know it attaches to the front end of the throttle shaft but how does the governor twist, turn or control the throttle????????????????? Ed B
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 04-25-2017, 10:44:19 PM
Nik M Nik M is offline
Registered-I
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Herndon, KS
Posts: 91
Thanks: 49
Thanked 70 Times in 31 Posts
Default Re: Fordson Wehr Governor Oil Level + Trans Oil Questions

Ed, the place wear the governor rod hooks is L-shaped and pivots in the middle. When the rod moves, the L pivots and in turn pivots the flat piece on the end of the throttle shaft. That way they took a linear motion and turned it into a rotational motion. I assume that piece came with the governor.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 04-26-2017, 08:45:22 AM
Rick McKay Rick McKay is offline
Subscriber
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Mass City, Michigan, USA
Posts: 504
Thanks: 795
Thanked 455 Times in 152 Posts
Default Re: Fordson Wehr Governor Oil Level + Trans Oil Questions

Nik & Ed,

That linkage bracket is supposed to be at the rear of the engine. It supports both the timing and throttle rods. The front bracket should have a single loop for the timing rod only.

Rick
Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Rick McKay For This Post:
  #13  
Old 04-26-2017, 11:53:23 AM
Steve Welker Steve Welker is offline
Registered-I
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Gratz, Pennsylvania
Posts: 272
Thanks: 398
Thanked 767 Times in 215 Posts
Default Re: Fordson Wehr Governor Oil Level + Trans Oil Questions

NiK,
Rick is correct, that support bracket is normally on the back head bolt supporting both the throttle rod and the timer rod.

You are also correct that the piece on the front of the vaporizer came with the governor. It does exactly what you said, converts the push-pull motion into rotary motion to turn the throttle shaft from the front side. There is one other piece to making the governor work. The throttle shaft connection at the rear of the vaporizer can be attached in 2 ways, a tight notch and a loose notch. The tractor comes from the factory hooked up in the tight notch. When adding the governor, it needs to be connected in the loose notch, which allows the governor to close the throttle plate to regulate top engine speed, and the hand throttle just becomes an adjustable stop for the max throttle plate open position.

This setup works OK for belt work where you want to run the engine at a constant 1000 RPM (Fordson rated speed), but does not work like a governor on more modern tractors where the governor opens or closes the throttle plate to maintain whatever speed you set by the hand throttle.

On a modern governor when you open the hand throttle, you are increasing spring tension on the governor arm which counteracts the force of the weights in the governor that close the throttle plate, allowing the throttle plate to open further, and in-turn allows the engine to run at a higher RPM. The governor is maintaining a balance between the throttle lever spring tension and the internal weight force to maintain an engine RPM. I would call this a variable RPM governor. Closing the hand throttle still positively closes the throttle plate.

An aftermarket Fordson governor that attaches to the front of the vaporizer (this WEHR included) does not work in this manner. When you open the hand throttle when it is in the loose notch, you are basically removing the positive stop that closes the throttle plate. This allows engine vacuum to open the throttle plate raising the engine RPM until the fixed RPM of the governor is reached that closes the throttle plate to maintain this speed. I would call this a fixed RPM governor. Very primitive, but worked well enough for stationary belt work.

Some aftermarket Fordson governors had a secondary adjustment where you could vary the spring tension to the governor providing what I would call a variable fixed RPM governor. For some this was a knob you turned on the governor, or a pull chain that went back to the dash. A little better but still not what we are used to today.

The only Fordson governor that I am aware of that worked like a modern governor is the Pierce model B. This is the Fordson Governor that is mounted on the coil box side and has a cast 'rooster comb' that mounts to the inside of the dash near the air washer. A proper working one of these is just as good as the factory Model 'N' governor. I've never cared for the 'feel' of the other governors when the throttle is hooked up in the loose notch. To me it feels like the hand lever is broken or unhooked entirely and gives me an uneasy feeling.

-Steve
Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Steve Welker For This Post:
  #14  
Old 04-26-2017, 08:30:42 PM
Nik M Nik M is offline
Registered-I
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Herndon, KS
Posts: 91
Thanks: 49
Thanked 70 Times in 31 Posts
Default Re: Fordson Wehr Governor Oil Level + Trans Oil Questions

Thanks Rick and Steve. Steve, so the way mine is is not correct per your description. Is that why the other end of the throttle rod has a second, opposite hole? Rotating the rod 180 degrees and hooking the throttle link rod to the short side would make the rod more responsive to hand throttle movement. This would counteract the fact that you have to traverse the wider slot to act upon the throttle shaft tang. If I'm reading you right, you say this still doesn't feel right and the hand throttle doesn't seem to have positive enough action on engine speed.

The narrow slot is a little wider than the throttle shaft tang, so the governor does get a little free action (a couple degrees of throttle shaft movement) before the tang hits the other side of the narrow throttle rod slot. So it seems the governor would be able to maintain minor dips in engine speed. Maybe this is a medium solution. I suppose either slot keeps the engine from running away, and the wider slot just helps overcome greater speed dips. Maybe I'm all wet, though.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_1142.jpg
Views:	71
Size:	85.8 KB
ID:	280943   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_1141.jpg
Views:	70
Size:	100.9 KB
ID:	280944   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_1143.jpg
Views:	76
Size:	84.9 KB
ID:	280945   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_1144.jpg
Views:	64
Size:	108.7 KB
ID:	280946  
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Nik M For This Post:
  #15  
Old 04-26-2017, 11:07:45 PM
Nik M Nik M is offline
Registered-I
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Herndon, KS
Posts: 91
Thanks: 49
Thanked 70 Times in 31 Posts
Default Re: Fordson Wehr Governor Oil Level + Trans Oil Questions

Steve, this Wehr ad shows a chain going back to the dash and maybe a spring between the chain and governor rod. Do you think all of this type of Wehr is supposed to have this? Maybe mine isn't a complete setup.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Wehr M.jpg
Views:	70
Size:	47.3 KB
ID:	280955  
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Nik M For This Post:
  #16  
Old 04-27-2017, 08:42:25 AM
Steve Welker Steve Welker is offline
Registered-I
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Gratz, Pennsylvania
Posts: 272
Thanks: 398
Thanked 767 Times in 215 Posts
Default Re: Fordson Wehr Governor Oil Level + Trans Oil Questions

Nik,
First off, good pictures showing what I was trying to describe!

Yes, rotating the throttle rod 180 degrees so the wide slot is engaged with the throttle shaft tang is the way it was meant to be hooked up with a governor. And you are correct the shorter hole for the throttle link does make it more responsive, but I could never get over the weird feeling of the wide slot requiring more movement of the throttle lever to have an effect on engine speed. As you can see, this wide slot is approx. 90deg. (1/4) of the cup on the end of the throttle rod. This allows the governor to move the throttle plate full its full range from wide open (full load) to practically closed (no load) while maintaining a constant RPM.

The narrow slot only allows very minor movement, and since the governor will most of the time have force against one side of this notch trying to close the throttle, I doubt you feel the play.

I knew one of the Fordson Governors used a chain, just did not remember it was this one. Sure looks like it should have the chain. Without this chain and spring the governor would probably hold the engine to a lower than max RPM. Also this spring tension would make the engine more responsive as this would open the throttle plate instead of just engine vacuum when you move the hand throttle. This chain would have had spring attached to the arm on the part that hooks to the front of the vaporizer. You can see the spring clearly in the very first picture of this thread. The more tension you put on the spring by pulling the chain resulted in a higher governed RPM. This pull chain becomes your way of regulating governed RPM, and the original hand throttle become little more than an adjustable positive stop for maximum throttle plate position. In fact, you could probably totally remove the original hand throttle and just use the chain to regulate engine speed, but not being able to 'push' the chain you would loose a positive way to close the throttle which could be scary if the governor failed!

-Steve
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Steve Welker For This Post:
  #17  
Old 04-27-2017, 09:54:16 AM
Steve Welker Steve Welker is offline
Registered-I
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Gratz, Pennsylvania
Posts: 272
Thanks: 398
Thanked 767 Times in 215 Posts
Default Re: Fordson Wehr Governor Oil Level + Trans Oil Questions

Ed,
In post #10 you say about having one run on the original coils. When it comes to hooking up the timer, I wanted to give you a tip on the proper parts.

There are 2 styles of timer rod brackets, one is the style Nik shows that locates the rod straight off the top of the head. These brackets are used with 1925 and newer dashes that have the kill switch at the bottom of the timer quadrant.

Attached is a picture of the older style bracket that drops down along the side of the head, that was used with older dashes from 1924 and earlier that do not have the kill switch.

Most importantly, these 2 different style brackets require 2 different links down to the timer. using the wrong link will either advance or retard the timing too far depending on the combo used.

-The early drop brackets require a shorter rod, roughly 12" end to end.
-The later horizontal brackets require a longer rod roughly 14" end to end.

Incorrectly using the short rod with the horizontal brackets would advance the timing to the point that there is a very good chance the engine will kick and maybe break an arm or wrist!

-Steve
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	HOLLEY 234.JPG
Views:	72
Size:	355.4 KB
ID:	280967  
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Steve Welker For This Post:
  #18  
Old 04-27-2017, 11:57:04 AM
Nik M Nik M is offline
Registered-I
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Herndon, KS
Posts: 91
Thanks: 49
Thanked 70 Times in 31 Posts
Default Re: Fordson Wehr Governor Oil Level + Trans Oil Questions

Steve, I'll briefly pause to say thank you and the others for all the help. Fordson F information is harder to find than the Model T or a later model tractor, and I appreciate the detail we're getting into here.

I see your point on the governor action. I always thought of a governor as raising the rpm when the engine bogged, but what I'm understanding now is that either a spring or engine vacuum acts on the butterfly and raising the rpm and that the governor's pull is the lower rpm. If what your saying with regards to 90 degree governor action is accurate, you could basically run the belt (let's saying grinder) at just off idle, throw a bucket of corn in and the tractor would go up to high speed, then the tractor would go back to off idle after the corn went through. When you read the ad, that's kind of what it describes. I've just always run an engine (newer) at high speed via the hand throttle; then the governor enables even higher speed on a particularly big load. I guess it's the same thing but not over as big of rpm range.

It seems that the way I have it now would minimally work, flipping the slot over would work but would require vacuum to pull the butterfly open, adding a fixed spring to the governor rod would work better, and adding a spring/chain that is adjustable would allow response adjustability.
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Nik M For This Post:
  #19  
Old 04-27-2017, 03:30:57 PM
Steve Welker Steve Welker is offline
Registered-I
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Gratz, Pennsylvania
Posts: 272
Thanks: 398
Thanked 767 Times in 215 Posts
Default Re: Fordson Wehr Governor Oil Level + Trans Oil Questions

Nik,
I'm glad to share any info on Fordsons I have. Since there were so many made, they are often overlooked as an inexpensive way to have fun with a steel wheeled tractor. Any help I can be to assist people in getting them running again, helps to keep them interesting and out of the scrap pile.

You are pretty close on your understanding of a centrifugal governor. They work by the fact as their RPM raises, the weights move outward, causing the governor arm to close the throttle plate, which in-turn lowers the RPM. When the RPM lowers, the weights move in, the arm relaxes it's closing force on the throttle plate allowing either engine vacuum or a spring to open the throttle plate. This then raises the RPM. This repeats infinitely until a steady state RPM is reached. Your grinder example is close, but a little off. What is happening is;
Say you are running an empty grinder at a given RPM of 500 by setting your governor. To maintain this RPM at a 'no-load' condition, the governor is holding the throttle plate practically closed, as the tractor need very little air/fuel to run the grinder at 500 RPM without any corn. When you throw in the bucket of corn, the load increases, and as the engine tries to slow down, the governor allows the throttle plate to open up to maintain the 500 RPM. The engine is not raising in RPM, but the throttle plate is opening further to allow more air/fuel to enter making more power and noise. The increased noise may seem like the tractor is running faster, but it is not at a higher RPM, just a higher power level.

Simple way of describing a centrifugal governor is that it tries to maintain a set RPM by varying the throttle plate position to meet the load of the tractor. For example when mowing with a newer tractor and you move the hand throttle until the tach reads 540 PTO RPM, and off you go forgetting about touching the hand throttle while you make the weeds fly. If the governor is working correctly, the mower will stay at 540 PTO RPM regardless of going up or down hill or how thick the grass is. This is because the governor allows the throttle plate in the carb to open, or closes it, depending on the load.

In your last sentence you are spot on. Currently hooked up in the tight notch does not allow the governor to do it's full job. I suggest hooking it up in the loose notch and giving it a try, you may like the way it performs. I've gotten so used to running Fordsons over the last 35+ years without a governor, hooking one up seems odd to me.

-Steve
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Steve Welker For This Post:
  #20  
Old 04-27-2017, 09:26:55 PM
Nik M Nik M is offline
Registered-I
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Herndon, KS
Posts: 91
Thanks: 49
Thanked 70 Times in 31 Posts
Default Re: Fordson Wehr Governor Oil Level + Trans Oil Questions

Steve, thanks. I think I'll be playing around with things until I get it how I like it. This will get me headed in the right direction.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

F o r u m Jump

Similar Threads Chosen at Random
Thread Thread Starter F o r u m Replies Last Post
Fordson Fuel, Governor Exhaust Question DTurner Antique Steel Wheel Tractors - Old Iron Lugs and Cleats 17 04-30-2016 09:12:11 PM
Fordson Accessory Wehr Brake Butch Howe Antique Steel Wheel Tractors - Old Iron Lugs and Cleats 19 01-23-2016 07:11:57 PM
1927 Fordson F questions SMertz Antique Steel Wheel Tractors - Old Iron Lugs and Cleats 19 05-19-2013 11:41:37 PM
Fordson F Bosch Mag / Governor Conversion questions sparkie Antique Farm Tractors 16 05-13-2013 11:20:53 PM


Use "Ctrl" mouse wheel to change screen size.
All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:59:50 AM.

Smokstak and Enginads site search!


All use is subject to our TERMS OF SERVICE
SMOKSTAK® is a Registered Trade Mark - A Community of Antique Engine Enthusiasts
Copyright © 2000 - 2019 by Harry Matthews P.O. Box 5612 - Sarasota, FL 34277