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Hit & Miss Gas Engine Discussion Meet collectors of hit and miss engines, ask questions about collecting, restoring and showing antique flywheel engines.

Hit & Miss Gas Engine Discussion

Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log


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  #61  
Old 12-11-2011, 04:04:49 PM
tharper tharper is offline
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

During a recent visit my friend Dave handed me a metal box filled with a tool post grinder. (got to love friends like that!)

Needless to say I put it to good use facing the new adjustment bolts on the lifters and the stems of the new valves. I used a rag sprayed with WD40 to catch the grit and protect the ways. After I finished the job I realized it would have been much safer and wiser to use paper towels or news paper rather than a rag which if caught could flail around and catch me!

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  #62  
Old 12-31-2011, 08:34:14 PM
tharper tharper is offline
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

To close out the year I decided to tackle the broken motor mount stud. There are 8 of these which support the weight of the engine which hangs from the bottom of the cast iron mounts.

The studs are fastened through the crankcase with large castle nuts at the bottom. It took me awhile to figure out that the studs - in addition to the castle nuts, are threaded into the crankcase as well.

Old engineering and craftsmanship is amazing! Each stud has two different threads - 3/4"x16 for the nuts at each end and 7/8"x14 for the threads in the crankcase!! And to top it off the four studs for the front mount are different than the studs for the rear mount. Its a wonder they could afford to make these engines. The machine time must have been astronomical!

Below is a photo of one of the old studs. Its about 12 inches long. I spent quite a bit of the day turning a new blank from 4140. Just have to cut the threads to finish it.

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  #63  
Old 01-01-2012, 12:14:41 AM
Kevin O. Pulver Kevin O. Pulver is offline
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Nice work, and nice call on the rag being unsafe. It made me think that maybe newspaper would be nice. It's cheap, very large and would lay nice if you dipped in in the solvent tank first or hosed it down with wd40.
You're right that the old ways were labor intensive and displayed a lot of craftsmanship. I think that's why we like the old stuff. It wasn't disposable like nowadays. Kevin
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  #64  
Old 01-20-2012, 04:52:10 PM
tharper tharper is offline
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Well, welcome to 2012.

What do I see for the coming year? More progress of course!!

Setting up a firm date to have some castings poured has put the pressure on to finish up the manifold patterns and core boxes.

With the Tee's done its time to work on the elbows. Here's the setup for turning a segmented (4 parts) donut which will form the elbow. Once the lathe work is done the opposite quarters will be matched thus forming a elbow

I used a boring bar for the center hole and have found that a parting tool works great for everything else.

Next step is turning some facets (flat sides of a hexagon) in cross section then round off the corners that way I can minimize the free hand work.

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  #65  
Old 01-20-2012, 10:46:37 PM
Jed Clamp Jed Clamp is offline
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

I cant wait to see this one run. Be fun to make a car for it.
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  #66  
Old 01-21-2012, 08:18:45 AM
tharper tharper is offline
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

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Originally Posted by Jed Clamp View Post
I cant wait to see this one run. Be fun to make a car for it.
Would be fun indeed - 8 gallons of fuel per hour!
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  #67  
Old 01-21-2012, 05:20:07 PM
tharper tharper is offline
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Continuing on the pattern for the intake manifold elbow/Tee....

I used the lathe to cut facets at 45 and 22.5 degrees. Then used sand paper to round it all off.

Here is the finished "Bagel"



And....an almost complete elbow. Next I will add core prints and a short straight piece which will be fastened into the top of the "Tee"



Mind you....this is the first time I have ever turned a "Bagel" so I was very pleased with the results.
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  #68  
Old 01-26-2012, 05:58:49 PM
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Today I got a new toy to help the project along... A milling attachment for the 13" South Bend....Its not a milling machine but it will get me by until I can procure one!

Needs a bit of fiddling with and a good cleaning but the price was right.

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  #69  
Old 02-05-2012, 08:05:48 PM
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Working away on the intake manifold patterns....

I procrastinated a long time before tacklingThe funky Elbow/Tee. As it turned out it was really quite simple to make Turn a half bagel match up two quarters and there you go.

Originally I had finished the patterns with several coats of shellac (to show-off my fine wood working skills) but......I now know why most patterns are painted a flat color.....to highlight the imperfections so they can be fixed.

Anyway one pattern left to go on the manifold then its time to tackle the nine patterns for the water fittings!

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  #70  
Old 02-13-2012, 05:19:49 PM
tharper tharper is offline
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Progress, Progress Progress!!

These are the intake manifold core boxes to date. I have one set left to do for the elbow/flange.

To fabricate these I turned and assembled male patterns. These were glued to MDF board then Plaster of paris (POP) molds were cast. POP works very well if your only casting a few pieces. More important its quick and cheap!

I had a moment of idiocraty (not sure if thats a word or not but we used it to describe a former employees actions.)
My original intent was to only make one core box for the two straight tees which would have required longer core prints on the shorter tee. However, I didn't do that so I had to make another core box.

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Old 02-23-2012, 01:21:14 PM
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Time to pour some molten bronze!

Finally finished the last pattern and corebox for the intake manifold. The completed manifold will have 6 individual bronze castings joined together with 3/4" O.D. brass tube.
Complete, it will measure 33" long from center to center.

I cannot even begin to tell you how pleased Iam to be at this point. When I got this engine I figured that if I could learn how to make patterns and create a new intake manifold that is an exact copy of the original (yes I could have cobbled up a plumbers nightmare) than the rest of the work would be within reach.

Here are the finished patterns and core boxes. The male masters for the core boxes are also shown. Off to the foundry tomorrow!




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  #72  
Old 02-23-2012, 03:29:14 PM
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Looks like those will be good castings. Where they originally bronze or was that what you chose.
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  #73  
Old 02-23-2012, 03:44:12 PM
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Quote:
Looks like those will be good castings. Where they originally bronze or was that what you chose.
Thanks! Yes, the original was indeed built-up of bronze and brass as were most fittings on this beast.

Fortunatly I had access to an original to use as a go-by.

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  #74  
Old 02-23-2012, 06:30:52 PM
OddDuck OddDuck is offline
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

I've got my brass sand rehydrating, should be just right by the time you get here! Hopefully i have enough material to make the cores out of, I think I do. Looking forward to getting your shiny new patterns all dirty, nice work!
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  #75  
Old 02-24-2012, 09:20:52 PM
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Yipee!! Yahoo!!

Today was casting day. I drove to the: Odd Duck Foundry. (ODF) in Orrington, ME. where I spent a wonderful day learning about foundry practices and watching as Peter Grant - the owner of ODF - skillfully used my wooden patterns and plaster-of-Paris core boxes to create wonderful bronze castings

Peter getting ready to pour the first piece.


Its just like Christmas morning opening up the box to see whats inside



Here are the first two pieces - the one on the left is a bronze tee for the intake manifold. The piece on the right is the oil pump drive housing which was cast in bearing grade bronze. I can't wait to see how these look with the flash removed and all smoothed-up.



We only had time to do two castings. Over the next few weeks Peter will be casting up the rest of the pieces for the intake manifold.

I am so thankful Peter showed such interest in this project. Once again we have solid proof of the wonderful people involved in saving, fixing and yes, even creating old iron

Here is the contact info (shameless plug) :

Odd Duck Foundry
364 River Road
Orrington, ME. 04474


http://www.oddduckfoundry.com/index.html
(207) 825-4540
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Old 02-24-2012, 11:22:21 PM
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Aww, shucks. Tweren't nuthin. The excellent patterns and the wonderful coreboxes that you brought were at least 75% of the day's success. That bearing bronze cast beautifully, and I'm looking forward to doing the rest of them, now. Can't wait to see that gearbox all machined up!
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Old 02-25-2012, 01:32:14 AM
Kevin O. Pulver Kevin O. Pulver is offline
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

I appreciate the photos of the pattern/foundry work.
I've cast only a walnut sized pump check out of aluminum, but I have plans for the "artful bodger's waste oil foundry furnace" that I hope to build one day.
He has videos on youtube and says he can even pour cast iron by burning only waste oil. I told my wife it may be the most dangerous thing we've ever done.
She was not encouraged by that statement.
Kevin
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  #78  
Old 02-25-2012, 06:13:44 AM
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Those turned out great looking. I need to get my brass casting upto date.
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Old 02-25-2012, 09:25:21 AM
OddDuck OddDuck is offline
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

Kevin, i use waste oil in my furnace, I actually had to melt out a cast iron "skull" (residual iron cooled off in the crucible) before we did the brass. Yes, yes, I know, not supposed to use the same crucibles for different metals, but brass/iron isn't near as bad as brass/aluminum. The brass and bronze poured and cut just fine.
My burner is a variant of the Bodgers, check out www.Alloyavenue.com , and it's predecessor, www.backyardmetalcasting.com .The biggest concern with iron or large amounts of brass is correct safety gear, it throws off a LOT of radiant heat at that temp. A thick leather apron or welder's jacket, a good face shield, and very high temp gloves are an absolute must. The gloves are the most important part, welder's gloves just won't cut it, and you don't want to drop a crucible full of molten iron because your hands are burning. SAFETY FIRST!!
Oh, and be prepared to have a whole new all-time consuming hobby, remember, projects are like rabbits, put two together and they tend to multiply.
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Old 02-25-2012, 07:23:19 PM
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Default Re: Wisconsin T-Head Restoration Log

More photos from the Odd Duck Foundry adventure and what I leaned during my all to short session of Foundry 101 as taught at ODF.

This is a view of the drag or bottom half of the flask used for the casting of the oil pump drive housing.
The upright thing is the core - this is made from sand mixed with sodium silicate or mollasses. When baked it becomes hard like a really old cookie. The imprint and raised area in fron of the core will form the stem of the oil pump drive housing. Because the center line of the stem did not match the parting line of the pattern Peter had to cope (dig) the sand to the stem centerline - otherwise he would not be able to pull (remove) the pattern from the sand.

The core is a temporary filler for any space you want to be hollow. Its aligned in imprints (core prints) left by the male pattern. After casting the core can be easily broken-up and removed. The recessed area in the core shown will become a raised boss which acts as a thrust bearing for the oil pump drive gear



This is a view of what will become the cope or upper half of the flask. This will be carefully aligned and lowered onto the drag. Here you can clearly see the imprint left by the pattern as well as the shrink-bob, gates and runners which have been cut in by hand. You can also see the recessed area were Peter coped down to the centerline of the stem.




Foundry work is like a box of chocolates...you never know whats inside! The rectangular piece is a very thin layer of bronze that seeped under the core. When knocked-out the core will be removed from the cavity within the casting. The round blob is the shrink-bob which acts like resevoir to feed the casting while it cools - this helps to minimize shrinkage of critical places such as the stem of this particular casting.



The finished bronze casting. Now the runners will be cut-off and the casting cleaned, smoothed-up and machined.

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