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Machine Shop and Tool Talk

Tapered pin, drilling, installing etc


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  #1  
Old 03-29-2008, 11:57:17 AM
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Default Tapered pin, drilling, installing etc

I am working on this 1 HP vertical Maytag that I acquired as parts in a box.
The flywheel tapered pin was missing. The shaft is baddly worn and a vocational machining class is going to install a new shaft into that crank. It
will require a tapered hole in the crank same as on the flywheel hub. They say
they will drill a straight hole the size of the smaller end of the taper in the
existing shaft and I will have to do the taper ??? so I have some questions

Are taper pins listed and supplied in sequential sizes for purchase ?? How are
tapered holes drilled ?? Can I buy a tapered drill bit that fits the hub and then
finish the hole in the shaft ?? This is unfamiliar ground to me. Some advice would be appreciated Thanks Vic P
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  #2  
Old 03-29-2008, 01:02:59 PM
John Palmer John Palmer is offline
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Default Re: Tapered pin, drilling, installing etc

Hi Vic, the hole for the taper pin is not drilled to a taper,you have to find a taper pin reamer. Drill the hole as you said the size of the small end a nd ream out to take the pin.Taper pins were used a lot on early stationary stuff over here in England. I don't know about over your side of thre pond. As regards to size probably the Maytag boys will help as I have no experience of them. John
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Old 03-29-2008, 01:05:17 PM
LCJudge LCJudge is online now
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Default Re: Tapered pin, drilling, installing etc

Vic, go to www.mcmaster.com and type in "tapered pin" on their search box on the upper left. It will bring up tapered pins, drills, reamers, etc. You can use a tapered drill to bore the hole to a taper then use a reamer to true it up and take out any chatter marks. If you have an old time machine shop in your area, they may have the tapered drills and reamers. Most modern applications (of the last 50 to 60 years) use roll pins instead of tapered pins so most "modern" machine shops don't have the tapered drills and reamers unless they've had a special job that called for them.
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Old 03-29-2008, 03:11:01 PM
K D Redd K D Redd is offline
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Default Re: Tapered pin, drilling, installing etc

Could this be the same taper as the Morse shank drill bit? Morse number one is not that small. Is there a Morse ZERO taper?

Kent
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Old 03-29-2008, 03:52:54 PM
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Steve Kunz Steve Kunz is offline
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Default Re: Tapered pin, drilling, installing etc

Vic, I have always used a tapered reamer. Run the reamer through the flywheel and the shaft at the same time so that both holes have the same taper, then drive the pin in and cut off the excess. When reaming you dont have to worry about taking to much out as long as the big end of the hole is not bigger than the big end of your pin.
Steve
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Old 03-29-2008, 05:42:16 PM
Hoodeleydoo Hoodeleydoo is offline
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Default Re: Tapered pin, drilling, installing etc

Its no big deal. The taper pins are all the same taper, they are just sliced out at different diameters and lengths. If you can get your hands on the "machinists handbook" at the trade school it'll show you what pin and reamer number you need. You'll need to measure one of the holes. the big hole or the small hole. compare that to the handbook to get the pin and reamer you need. You can ream the hole with the tapered reamer. if you keep reaming it will go deeper and deeper making the hole bigger and bigger. The more you ream the deeper the pin will sit into the hole. ream only what you need to get a clean hole (no cylinderical areas fromt the drilling). Tap the new pin in slightly until it has a snug fit. The pin should be exposed on both ends. If not you may need to the next size up. They make pins of different lengths so you can get what you need (i have a bunch of teh longer ones about 4-6" long range). If there is enough of the pin exposed on both ends then give it a couple more taps to seat it in another 0.005 mils or so. Don't hammer the pin in too hard as the pin will never come out easily and you could overstress the part. Grind/cut off the excess parts of the pin. make the ends pretty. I like to leave a little bit of the small end exposed (about 1/8") and then use a sharp prick punch and punch two dimples 180 degrees apart. that way the pin won't come out even if it loosens up but you can grind it off and then drive the pin out when you want to take things apart.
get a GOOD set of reamers or a couple of the size you need. it will be worth it. lots of cutting fluid, and don't ream too quickly or push too hard. the shop should drill a hole close enough to the size so the reamer will find the center. I use a milwaulkee hole shooter and never go very fast, maybe a quarter of the top speed. go lightly and use ots of fluid on your first time. once the reamer stops reaming and is dull get another reamer. On the extreme case, if you keep running the reamer without cutting you could work harden the material.
practice on a piece of hard wood or aluminum.
good luck and have FUN!
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Old 03-29-2008, 07:39:02 PM
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Default Re: Tapered pin, drilling, installing etc

Thank you all who reponded. You are all precise and clear with your advice
and I look forward to getting at it Thanks a bunch

VicP
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Old 03-29-2008, 09:51:24 PM
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Default Re: Tapered pin, drilling, installing etc

, Vic,
While working as a Millwright/Mechanic for the
Quaker Oats co. we had quite a selection of tapered pins for the plant equipment , we also had a good selection of drill bits that were made for drilling to fit the tapered pins, If I remember correct the deeper you drilled determined the size of pin used, one drill bit may have worked for four or five different pins, just drilled deeper. I do not ever remember having to ream the hole, We did drill a pilot holes before using the tapered bits.

I know when the plant closed some things dissapeared and the tapered drill bits were one of the items that were no longer to be found.

One would think that McMaster-Carr or Graingers would still sell these bits.

,Mike
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Old 03-29-2008, 10:14:11 PM
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Default Re: Tapered pin, drilling, installing etc

Thanks Mike and others

This subject seems to have brought out memories and experiences from
the good ole days when tapered pins were cool and you've taken me right back there

Vic
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Old 04-15-2008, 02:39:30 AM
Beanscoot Beanscoot is offline
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Default Re: Tapered pin, drilling, installing etc

When I was working for a small machine shop about three years ago I made up several sets of steel blocks which were about two inches thick and had taper pin holes reamed that depth. I step drilled to remove as much metal as possible before reaming. This was done in a CNC mill, and the reamers didn't seem to dull even after eighty holes. This was fairly tough steel too. I think I used about 30 sfpm and high feed.
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Old 07-08-2008, 05:40:07 PM
Judd Rogers Judd Rogers is offline
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Default Re: Tapered pin, drilling, installing etc

In the machine world there are basically two kinds of tapers. Self holding and removeable. Taper pins are still used today. I have recently designed some ground support structures for a payload on a rocket that just launched and used taper pins in construction. Lots of good comments here. Always ream your taper as this provides the finish to the inside that will allow you to remove the pin later. Very good info on peening the big end to keep the pin tight. I've never used a tapered drill for them, as we just step drill and then ream, but that drill sounds like it would be worth the money. Tapered pipe reamers are sure good when your NPT fitting is over an inch. Just drill as close as you can then begin to ream. I always check the taper against the pin using prussian blue dye as you must have even contact completely around the pin or your holes will enlongate and the pin will get loose. Another alternative and easier to get right, is to make a straight hole and set a rivet in it. As with the taper pin, you will eliminate all clearance between the hole and the rivet, thus creating a "zero dead band condition"(no slop at all!) Taper pins are used when you want easy disassembly, but do come loose. You can grind the head of the rivet on one side to remove it, so that's not too bad either. MSC.com sells reamers, drills and anything else you would need. Good luck and let us know how you did.
Best Regards
Judd
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