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Oil Field Engines & Related Equipment

Need Half Breed ID


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  #1  
Old 12-27-2008, 10:53:10 AM
Dallas Cox Dallas Cox is offline
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Default Need Half Breed ID

A friend got a nice half breed engine for Christmas.
We need to know the make of the gas cylinder and would appreciate any info that can be copied.
We think the bedplate is an Ajax.
Note the exhaust flange and intake valve on top of cylinder.
Go to the Shutterfly link below to view pictures.
Thank You For any Help.

Dallas

http://share.shutterfly.com/share/re...8AbNmjlmzas2ck
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  #2  
Old 12-28-2008, 07:50:32 PM
Tremel Tremel is offline
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Default Re: Need Half Breed ID

Dallas,

Just spoke to Marlin. That's a B.D. Northrup cylinder, built in Washington, PA. The intake was a dead giveaway. Even more interesting is that the engine he found was on a lease only a few miles from where it was made.

Northrup was well known for his Gas meters and dry gas regulators for the gas industry. He also build various supplies for the oilfield. I'm not sure if he worked with or for Gardner at one time, but I think there is some sort of relation since the two shops where a few yard away.

My guess is the cylinder was built between 1900 and 1920.

Hope this helps....
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  #3  
Old 12-29-2008, 08:06:07 AM
Dallas Cox Dallas Cox is offline
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Default Re: Need Half Breed ID

Thanks Bill, do you have any info on Northrup that could
be copied?

Thanks For Your Help.

Dallas
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  #4  
Old 12-29-2008, 11:31:51 AM
Tremel Tremel is offline
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Default Re: Need Half Breed ID

The only info I have came from the local library about his business. There's a photo of Barred Dix Northrup and it discusses his business in Washington, PA as a manufacture and supplier of supplies for the oil and gas industry. Currently, All my notes are boxed away as we are building a new home and will be moving in a few months.

If you look at some old Oilwell supply and National supply catalogs, you will find Northrup gas meters and regulators.

Other than that, there really isn't much. His gas engines never really left the area.
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Old 12-29-2008, 12:03:00 PM
Tremel Tremel is offline
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Default Re: Need Half Breed ID

Okay, I made some spelling errors. It's Blancher Dix Northrup.

Also, with the updated Patent information out on Google, I was able to pull down his patent data for his improved Clutch on that engine. Patent number: 975987 was issued in 1910. So, since Marlin's engine has the patened Northrup Clutch, it must have been built between 1910 and 1920.

I have a Northrup Convertable, but interesting enough, my cylinder is an early design and the Clutch is a Gardner (also built in Washington, PA). My guess is that my engine was built between 1900 and 1910.
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Old 12-29-2008, 12:22:09 PM
Tremel Tremel is offline
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Default Re: Need Half Breed ID

Now you got me going. More data has been uploaded since I last researched.

History of Washington County, Page 1298

BLANCHER DIX NORTHRUP, machinist, and owner of an iron and brass fonndry at Washington, Pa., comes of one of the oldest established families in America,and is one of the leading and enterprising citizens of Wash_ington County.
The Northrup family was established in this country by Joseph Northrup, who landed here in 1637 and settled in Connecticut, where he married Mary Norton, and according to the records of Massachusetts, Connecticut and New York, ninety-five of his male descendants bearing the paternal name, fought for American Independence in the Revolutionary War. Our subject, B. D. Northrup,is of the ninth generation of the Northrup family in America. He was eight years of age when his parents came to the oil fields of Pennsylvania, which region was then but little better than a wilderness. His education was such as could be obtained in the schools of that period and we find him in his early boyhood pumping an oil well and running a regular tour from midnight until noon for the late Jonathan Watson, of Titusville, Pa. At the age of sixteen years he apprenticed himself to J. H. Luther, of Petroleum City, Pa., who was re_garded as one of the best and most expert machinists in the oil country. After leaving the employ of Mr. Luther, he drifted with the excited element from Butler County to the Bullion field in Venango County, and in 1876 when Bullion's star commenced to pale he emi_grated to Bradford field, where he remained until 1880, when he went back to Butler Connty until 1884. He then went to Bradford field, where he worked as journey_man machinist until the shut-down movement was inaugurated, after which he came to Washington County and engaged in business for himself at Washington, his equipments being one lathe and one drill press. About this time Mr. Northrup perfected and placed upon the market his noted steam gas regulator, which met with most wonderful success, and two years after establish_ing the business was enabled to build his present plant to which he has since added a finely equipped iron and brass fonndry. This plant lies 334 feet along the P., C., C. St. L. R. R., is 165 feet in width and was erected in 1898, giving employment to about sixty men, all of whom are capable, many of them having been with Mr. Northrup fifteen years. The motive power of the plant is furnished by a gas engine, and the entire establishment is heated by steam, the whole plant being one of the finest and most complete in the oil region. Mr. Northrup has given his entire time to the business and has demonstrated what perseverance and ability can accomplish, when justly applied, and has became con_spicuous as a manufacturer of oil well devices and ap_pliances of various kinds. One of the principal products of his shops is the most reliable gas regulators in exist_ence, 8,000 of them being in use from New York to Cali_fornia, the territory embraced being the oil and gas fields of New York, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky, Indian Territory, Oklahoma and Canada. Mr. Nortbrup is also very successful in the manufacturing of "The Either Steam-Gas Engine."
Mr. Northrup is one of the leading citizens of Wash_ington County, enterprising, industrious and ever ready to give aid to any enterprise, which tends to develop or improve the community in which he lives.
In 1882, Mr. Northrup was joined in marriage with Emma Hollobaugh, who was born at Brady's Bend, Armstrong County, and is the youngest daughter of Squire Jacob Hollobaugh, of Armstrong County. Three children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Northrup, namely: Mary, married F. C. Coppes, of Allegheny; Burton, a student at Cornell University; and Sarah Margaret at home.

(Source: McFarland, Joseph F. 20th Century History of the City of Washington and Washington County, Pennsylvania and Representative Citizens, Chicago, Ill., Richmond - Arnold Pub. Co., 1910, 1,438 pgs)
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  #7  
Old 12-30-2008, 09:14:16 AM
Dallas Cox Dallas Cox is offline
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Default Re: Need Half Breed ID

Thanks very much Bill, very nice history you came up with.
I am sure Marlin will have this engine up and running and
at a show this spring.
We appreciate the info very much.

Dallas
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